Best Makeup Practices To Protect Skin

 

 



Makeup has been marketed successfully as the ultimate beauty enhancer. Yet, makeup has also been found as the culprit of negative, long-term effects if not used and removed properly. Skin is a large organ and needs to be taken care of in order for it to last in a beautiful, healthy way. Applying foundation everyday, for example, without removing it correctly can clog pores for long periods of time resulting in more breakouts overtime.

Below, you’ll find the best practices to follow to keep your skin at its healthiest, so there can be less breakouts and wrinkles in the future.

1) Remove Makeup & Clean Face Thoroughly Before Bed


This tip is number one for a reason. Keeping makeup on overnight is BAD for your skin. Women’s Health Magazine invited Dr. Dennis Gross, an expert dermatologist in New York City, to aid in illustrating the effects of makeup on the skin when not removed at night:
A survey over the summer revealed a third of women sleep with their makeup on at least two nights a week. Doing so can clog your pores and oil glands, says Gross. “When the makeup becomes impacted in pores, it can make them appear larger.” It also stretches them out and, unfortunately, since your skin collagen levels decline as you age, your pores won't bounce back to their original size as easily, says Gross.

 

The best way to remove makeup can be applied in two simple steps:



  1. Use Makeup Remover: Make sure to take time to remove as much makeup off the face as possible.

  2. Apply A Facial Cleanser: Although it may seem that all the foundation, maskera, and eyeshadow have been removed, a good facial cleanser is essential to finish the job. Facial cleansers are created to remove hidden dirt and bacteria that are not as readily seen. So, after using makeup remover, make sure to use a facial cleanser to remove the cosmetic leftovers that you don’t see.


 

2) Wash Makeup Brushes Every Month


Makeup brushes encounter just about everything that develops on our face: the oils, the dirt, and all the other gross substances that develop on the skin. Continuously using these brushes without washing them occasionally will do more damage than the makeup itself on the skin. It is recommended that all brushes should be cleaned at least once a month. Certain kinds of brushes have been recommended to be washed more frequently than that.

3) Always Use Sunscreen & Moisturizer


Is sunscreen and moisturizer really that essential to skin health on a daily basis?

Hallie Gould posted an article on Byrdie with an explanation on the subject from expert dermatologists:
"Sunscreen is not an ingredient," asserts Ulli Haslacher, the founder of Pour Moi Skincare. "It should be treated as a very important layer in your skincare routine and should always be applied last (but before makeup). The purpose of sunscreen is to form a protective film on top of the skin to shield it—SPF is not there to restore moisture balance or deliver ingredients deeper into the skin."

Apply sunscreen and moisturizer every day before applying makeup. It is as simple as that.

4) Stop Using Old Makeup


Continuing to wear old clothes, eat old food, or consume expired juice or milk has never worked well in the long run for anyone. Cosmetics that have expired should be considered similarly.

The Huffington Post posted the expiration dates for different cosmetics:

  • Eyeliner: 6 months to a year

  • Mascara: 3-6 months

  • Blush, eyeshadow, and other powder cosmetics: 1-2 years

  • Foundation: 6 months to 2 years

  • Lipstick: 2 years

  • Natural products: 3-6 months


Any makeup product kept longer than the estimated expiration dates above should be removed immediately. Not only do these products work less when they expire, but they can also have serious, unfavorable effects on the skin overtime.

5) Never Share


This best practice is more of a call to common sense rather than a mere point of advice. As previously mentioned, makeup brushes touch all the disgusting things on our face and so do the eyeshadow pallets and foundation creams.

The real question is:

Why would any individual decide to be the recipient of someone else’s facial dirt and bacteria? The unwanted substances from our skin, if left on overnight, does a lot of harm overtime. Can you imagine what the combination of someone else’s dirt would do?

Dermatologists have given the dangerous effects that come from sharing makeup, which include: “acne, cold sores, eye infections, and staph infections.” Experts from Westlake Dermatology have also added in further explanation for why these effects occur:
Makeup is the ideal breeding ground for viruses and bacteria. The very nature of makeup (particularly liquid formulations) and the dark containers in which they are typically packaged are the perfect habitat for unwanted germs. Makeup brushes, even when properly cleaned between applications, have a high degree of transferring bacteria each time they pass over cracks in the skin or popped pimples.

To sum it up, keep your makeup to yourself. Don’t share it.  

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 
kids swimming in the pool

Pool Dangers and Drowning Prevention―When It’s Not Swimming Time by Colleen Kraft M.D.

Swimming pools can have a powerful pull on little children―even when it's not swimming time. Those glistening turquoise-blue ripples may look especially inviting to an active toddler or an overly confident preschooler.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends several ways parents can help keep children safe around home swimming pools and hot tubs―all year long―in your own backyard, your neighbor's, or on vacation.

Fact: Most drownings in kids 4 and under happen in home swimming pools.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) studied drownings among children age 4 and under in Arizona, California, and Florida, where pools are especially common. It found that nearly 70% of the children were not expected to be at or in the pool, yet they were found in the water. In fact, 46% of the children were last seen in the house.

kids swimming in the poolPool fences are for above-ground pools that are portable as well as those that are permanent, inground pools, and hot tubs.

Between 2013 and 2015, most (58%) drownings among children age 4 and under took place in a pool or spa at their own home. Most children drowned when they wander out of the house and fell into a swimming pool that was not fenced off from the house. They slipped out a door, climbed out a window, or even crawled through a doggy door to access the pool.

But, a family swimming pool isn't the only one a child can get into unnoticed. More than a quarter (27%) of drownings among children age 4 and under took place at the home of a friend, relative or neighbor. Only some individual states and municipalities have laws requiring pool safety fences; there is no national pool fence law. Whenever your child will be in someone else's home, always check for ways your child could access pools and other potential hazards.

Pool fencing recommendations:

  • 4 feet, 4 sides. The pool fence should be at least 4 feet high and completely surround the pool, separating it from the house and the rest of the yard.

  • Climb-proof. The fence shouldn't have any footholds, handholds, or objects such as lawn furniture or play equipment the child could use to climb over the fence. Chain-link fences are very easy to climb and are not recommended as pool fences. (If they are used, make sure openings are 1¾ inches or smaller in size).

  • Slat space. To ensure a small child can't squeeze through the fence, make sure vertical slats have no more than 4 inches of space between them. This will also help keep small pets safe, too.

  • Latch height. The fence should have a self-closing and self-latching gate that only opens out, away from the pool area. The latch should be out of a child's reach—at least 54 inches from the ground.

  • Gate locked, toy-free. When the pool is not in use, make sure the gate is locked. Keep toys out of the pool area when it is not in use.


Drowning is silent. Alarms break that silence.

  • Pool alarms. Children can drown within seconds, with barely a splash. Swimming pool alarms can detect waves on the water's surface and sound off to attract attention when someone has fallen into the pool.

  • Consider alarms on the pool fence gate and house doors. Door and gate alarms can be equipped with touchpads to let adults pass through without setting them off. House doors should be locked if a child could get to the pool through them.

  • Window guards. These can be especially helpful for windows on the house that face the pool.


What Else Can Parents Do?

Even with safety measures in place, parents should be prepared in case that their child gets into a swimming pool unseen. Some precautions that may help:

  • Life jackets: Put your child in a properly fitted US Coast Guard approved life jacket when around or near water, such as when visiting a home with a pool.

  • Swim lessons. The AAP recommends swim lessons as a layer of protection against drowning that can begin for many children starting at age 1. Learn more here.

  • CPR training. Parents, caregivers, and pool owners should know CPR and how to get emergency help. Keep equipment approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, such as life preservers and life jackets at poolside.

  • Check the water first. If a child is missing, look for him or her in the pool or spa first. This is especially important if your child is prone to wandering.

  • Spread the word. Share this article on social media and with family, friends, and neighbors


The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Skin Exams and Early Detection of Melanoma by Alison Sims M.D.

A common question asked during any routine office visit at our urgent care is “by the way, doctor, could you also look at this spot on my skin and tell me if it is something to worry about?” I am happy that so many people are checking their skin for unusual spots. Early detection of skin cancer increases survival rates for those patients who are diagnosed with melanoma. I encourage prevention with sunscreen and clothing, and promote early detection by educating my patients on regular skin self-examinations.

Melanoma is the most feared and deadliest of the skin cancers. The incidence of melanoma has been rising worldwide for the past two decades and now it is the sixth most common cancer in North America. Living in Southern California our sun exposure is much higher, and the risk of melanoma is higher in geographical areas with strong sun. Other risk factors include a history of sunburns in childhood and teenage years, a tendency to freckle, a high number of moles, phototypes with lighter skin, hair and eye color, and a personal or family history in first-degree relatives of melanoma.

Most melanomas are detected by patients themselves, and the more you know about what to look for, the better off you are at protecting you and your loved ones. In the last 10 years the two most common checklists used for identifying suspicious lesions that should be further evaluated have been revised. These simple criteria will help you to distinguish between an ordinary harmless mole, and a potentially cancerous skin lesion.

Read these checklists carefully and maybe even post them somewhere in your bathroom as a reminder to check yourself head to toe when you are undressed.

ABCDE Rules

A = Asymmetry (if a lesion is bisected, one half is not identical to the other half)

B = Border irregularities

C  = Color variegation (a combination of brown, red, black, blue/gray, or white)

D  = Diameter greater than or equal to 6 mm (about the size of a pencil eraser)

E  = Evolving: a lesion that is changing in size, shape, color, or a brand new lesion

(Source JAMA. 2004;292(22):2771)

Glasgow Seven-Point Checklist

MAJOR FEATURES (indications for referral to dermatologist):  

  • Change in size/new lesion

  • Change in shape

  • Change in color


MINOR FEATURES (reinforces that a referral is needed):

  • Diameter greater than or equal to 7mm

  • Inflammation

  • Crusting or bleeding


(Source Br J Dermatology. 2010;163(2):238)

If you are middle-aged and have a light complexion then it is recommended that you have a baseline skin exam by a physician and annual rechecks. In addition, skin self-examinations at home should be monthly, and ideally with a friend or family member so that the back of the body is examined. Use a bright light source and a magnifying lens if necessary, and be sure to check areas that are not sun exposed as well. Your exam should include the entire head, neck and scalp, all surfaces of the arms, legs, hands, feet, webs of fingers and toes, palms and soles, nail beds, back, buttocks, and even private parts. You should also know that suspicious lesions may not be dark in color as there are some rare melanomas that are called “amelanotic” and can be nonpigmented. Happy hunting and spread the word, melanoma can be detected early!

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

What to Know About Scoliosis by Alyssa Sota

Alyssa pulseWhat is scoliosis?

Scoliosis means that the spine curves somewhat from side to side rather than being straight down the back. The spine is made of bones called vertebrae that normally stack one on top of the other in a straight line. The bones in the upper back are called thoracic vertebrae. This is the most common place for scoliosis. The bones in the lower back are called lumbar vertebrae. Scoliosis develops gradually. It is usually noticed just before or during puberty when your child is going through a growth spurt. Girls get scoliosis more often than boys. Usually parents don’t notice the gradual changes caused by scoliosis. The curvature is usually discovered by a doctor or school nurse.

What is the cause?scoliosis

There are many causes of scoliosis. Sometimes vertebrae are incompletely formed or misshapen. Sometimes children who have legs of different lengths will develop a curvature of the spine. Other times, diseases cause scoliosis. However, in children and teens the cause is most often unknown. When a cause for the scoliosis cannot be found, it is called idiopathic scoliosis. In idiopathic scoliosis, some of the vertebrae are rotated. This causes the ribs on one side of the back to stick out more, causing a hump.

What are the symptoms?

At first, the symptoms are painless and not always easy to recognize. Someone with scoliosis may:

  • Have uneven shoulder or waist

  • Have a hump on one side of the back

  • Have one or both shoulder blades sticking out

  • Lean slightly to one side

  • Sometimes patients with scoliosis will have back pain


 

How is it treated?

Your provider will suggest the treatment based on your age, how much you are likely to grow, the degree and pattern of the curve and the type of scoliosis. You may be referred to a back specialist.

Source:

https://www.spine-health.com/conditions/scoliosis/scoliosis-what-you-need-know

https://www.clear-institute.org/learning-about-scoliosis/scoliosis-symptoms/?gclid=CJnVgomti9QCFRm2wAod9lcEDA

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

Do You Wear Makeup? Skin Care Tips 101 by Shay Mendoza

Shay webFor women of all ages, from preteen to those enjoying their retirement, we have all learned to deal with our flaws. Fortunately, we do have a tool that keeps those flaws hidden, MAKEUP! Applying make-up is a magical way for many women to have the appearance of smooth skin, nicely shaped lips, and perfect eyebrows, etc. In today’s generation, makeup is now being considered an “art”, not only are young women applying vibrant colors, concealer, foundation, blush in the cheek bones to give the facial structure perfect dynamics and glow, but so are young men.

Within the beauty of this talent, it does have risks. Proper skin care is a necessity to not only maintain a clean face, but to keep new problems from appearing, such as clogged pores, face discoloration, dry skin and acne.  Keeping a hydrated, oil-free and glowing natural skin isn’t a challenge, in fact it’s possible with the following cleansing tips:

An effective skin care regimen starts with a good cleanser.  When choosing a cleanser that’s right for your skin, always choose a gentler one, since harsh products can trigger the skin to produce more oil. For people with dry skin, select a product with no or few chemicals, perfumes or dyes. People with oily skin should choose a cleanser that will remove the oil without stripping the skin because that can cause production of even more oil. People with combination and normal skin can select a cleanser that is gentle depending on the climate and current skin needs. Ladies please note that regular facial cleansers can’t remove and break down waterproof makeup, so be sure to use a separate makeup remover especially for that makeup. It’s also very important to recognize that properly cleansing the skin prepares it to absorb products you may put on after like a serum or moisturizer.  Once you’re done thoroughly cleansing make sure to follow up with a moisturizer that best fits your skin type and needs. Even if you have oily skin, don’t skip this step! Oily skin doesn’t mean your skin is moisturized or hydrated.

Antioxidants, charcoal, and clay masks are helpful products that can be used before or after applying a new face of make-up. If you wear make-up daily, then a mask every 2-5 days would benefit you. If you wear make-up occasionally, then 1 mask per week would suffice. Using make-up removal wipes and cleaning the face afterwards is also another must.  Please note that regular facial cleansers can’t remove and break down waterproof makeup, so be sure to use a separate makeup remover especially for that makeup.

The most important way to keep not only your make-up looking beautiful and glowing, is to also maintain clean brushes and sponges. Cleaning your brushes and sponges in warm-hot water with a brush cleanser once a week is essential. There are so many ways to maintain good skin care from the basics such as soap and water, daily moisturizing, facial masks, hydrating lotions and more.  Sephora, Amazon, and DIY also give great tips and budgeting ways how to keep the beautiful faces of ours looking and staying healthy and clean.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

Q. & A. with Bree Maloney – Nutrition

Question- What do you consider to be a healthy diet?

Answer- I consider a healthy diet to be a balance of fruits, veggies, grains, protein, fat and carbs. I say – everything in moderation. It’s not just about a healthy diet, it’s about developing healthy eating habits. You want to eat a variety of healthy foods. If you diet, day after day, consists of the same half dozen foods, you could fall short on some key nutrients your body needs. You also want to focus on high-fiber foods such as avocados, almonds, broccoli and lentils. Foods containing high fiber should supply about 20-35 grams of fiber a day, depending on your calorie needs. You do want to eat lots of produce. Remember to buy organic if you can to limit your exposure to any pesticides or toxic substances. Limit sugary foods, beverages and refined grains, which includes soda, candy, white bread, regular pasta and many snack and baked foods. A high intake of added sugar increases inflammation, risk of diabetes and insulin resistance in the body. And remember to drink alcohol in moderation if you do. Try and limit one drink a day for women and two for men. While alcohol has potential heart benefits, it poses a variety of health risks, especially in excess amounts.

Question- What are unhealthy ingredients on labels to avoid?

Answer- As a rule of thumb, I always try and eat things that don’t have a lot of ingredients in them. If I run my eye by an ingredient list and see a dozen names I can’t even pronounce, chances are it’s not good for you. Try aiming for foods that are minimally processed. Some ingredients to avoid and watch out for are: High-Fructose Corn Syrup, MSG, Partially Hydrogenated Oil, Sodium Nitrate, BHA, and BHT.

Question- What is MSG, and should I avoid it?

Answer- MSG or Monosodium Glutamate is the sodium salt of glutamic acid and is one of the most abundant naturally occurring non-essential amino acids. It’s basically a flavor enhancer commonly added to Chinese food, canned vegetables, soups and processed meats. Just like salt and sugar, MSG exists in nature, it tastes good at normal levels, but large amounts at high concentrations can do harm to you. MSG has been known to cause headaches and asthma.

Question- Can you please recommend healthy snacks?

Answer- I do recommend having some sort of snacks throughout the day. I tend to eat about 4-5 smaller meals a day and snacks are a big part of my diet. What my go-to snacks are raw almonds or any type of raw nuts, dried fruit such as raisins (golden raisins), apricots or crunch banana chips. Sometimes I’ll cut a few apples slices and put nut butter on them or some low-sodium beef or turkey jerky. I do have a recipe I like to make where I can make my own energy balls. They’re easy to make and contain almond butter, crushed dates, walnuts, cocoa and protein powder. I’ll sprinkle and roll them in coca nibs and coconut flakes. You can easily google an energy ball recipe, I highly recommend it!

Question- Is salt really that bad for you?

Answer- Again, everything in moderation. If you eat too much salt, the extra water stored in your body raises your blood pressure. So, the more salt you eat, the higher your blood pressure will be and with higher blood pressure comes to greater strain on your heart, arteries, kidneys and brain. I tend to choose foods that say ‘low-sodium’ or I check the nutrition label to see how much salt content is in what I want to eat. Some foods claim to be ‘low-sodium’ but then turn out to have a ton of salt! Though we do need salt/sodium to survive as our bodies rely on sodium for muscle contractions, nerve transmissions and the control systems for balancing body fluids, together with other electrolytes like potassium, you don’t want to have too much salt. Excessive sodium intake is one of the major factors contributing to stroke and heat attacks.

Question- If I want to get healthy, what are the basic first steps?

Answer- Start small and work your way up. You don’t suddenly want to cut salt, fat and carbs out of your diet like some people do. It’s not a long-term solution. Still reward yourself with some fat or sugar such as dark chocolate, but just don’t be excessive. What I did is simply substitute things. Instead of this type of cereal, I’ll choose a healthier option. Instead of whole milk, choose coconut or almond milk. Throw some chia seeds in your yogurt or add blueberries or kale to your smoothie. Remember to do what is going to work for you. There are tons of diets and fabs out there, but if you stick to reading nutrition labels and eating more whole foods than processed foods, that is a great start.

For many people eating healthy is a challenge, and to some a source of dread. But eating healthy should bring you joy and a centerpiece to your life. Like the things you eat and enjoy cooking and making meals with friends and family. Once you create good habits, then eating healthy won’t be a chore, it will become a lifestyle and something that’s easy to do.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

 
young girl applying sunscreen to her arm at tropical beach

How to Prevent & Soothe Sunburns

 

 

Nothing will ruin an amazing day at the beach faster than a sunburn.

You just finished your daily activities out in the sun, you get back to your residence and someone exclaims, “Oh, my gosh! Look at your back!”

But you already knew what happened when you saw their facial expression. You know that over the next week you are in store for pain, sensitivity, and perhaps worst of all…peeling.

 

How to Prevent Sunburns


While it may not always be convenient, the easiest way to prevent sunburns is to use sunscreen.

There are a lot of different sunscreens with different sun protection factors (SPF). SPF represents the amount of time it will take for the sun to redden your skin with sunscreen vs without. So ideally, with SPF 30 it would take you 30 times longer to burn than if you weren’t wearing sunscreen.

The higher the SPF of your sunscreen means the less likely that you’ll get burned. Most experts recommend that you should use SPF 50-100.

Make sure you are following the instructions exactly. If you are going to be in the water, use waterproof sunscreen and reapply your sunscreen in accordance with the directions.

Another option would be to just avoid being out in the sun. Stay in the shade or indoors. But let’s be realistic, that likely won’t happen. So, make sure you go through the inconvenience to get someone to rub sunscreen on your back and shoulders.

 

How to Soothe Sunburns


So here you are. You either didn’t believe us or you didn’t read this before you went out in the sun. You got sunburnt and now you are dealing with that bright red, painful burn.

Well, we are here to help. These are some tips that can help soothe your sensitive skin:

Aloe Vera: This is actually a plant, but you can buy it in a cream or gel form. Just apply it to your sunburn regularly. It will both soothe, hydrate, and help repair the affected area.


A Damp Towel: If you don’t have Aloe Vera, a damp towel will provide greatly needed relief to your sunburn.


Take a Cool Bath or Shower: Almost anything cool and wet will help soothe your skin. Soak in a cool tub for a while to soothe your sunburn.


Allow Your Skin to Heal: If you got a really bad sunburn, it may blister. Do not remove the blisters as it can cause infection. Allow your blisters to heal naturally.


Protect the Sunburn: Avoid rubbing or scratching your sunburn. Do not wear clothes that are too tight or made with rough materials.


Take Ibuprofen: You can take some over-the-counter painkillers to help alleviate the pain.


Next time you go to the beach, pool, or anywhere out in the sun, don’t forget your sunscreen—the higher SPF the better. But if you decide to ignore or forget the sunscreen and get burnt, be sure to follow our tips above for a less painful recovery.

 

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
hand resting on knee in meditation pose

7 Ways to Reduce Stress for Better Productivity

 

Life is hectic.

We live in a stress-filled world. Our workplaces are so competitive that if you aren’t constantly striving to be better, you’ll be passed up. But we still try to do our best to balance our time between our time-consuming job, our loved ones, furthering our education, and a thousand other activities we have going on.

We frequently feel like a juggler trying to maintain multiple balls in the air,  worrying about what might happen if we let them slip. We can easily become overwhelmed and we often feel frustrated, agitated, and have trouble relaxing. Or perhaps you constantly worry, lack focus, or regularly get sick.

These are all signs of stress. While stress is very normal in our society, as you can imagine, stress leads to lowered productivity. Here are seven ways you can reduce stress and live a healthier, more productive life.

 

1) Get More Sleep


There are so many benefits to getting a good night’s rest. According to the American Psychological Association, adults who get at least 8 hours of sleep per night experience less frustration, don’t feel as overwhelmed, and are less likely to skip exercise.

We all know that we should be getting 7-9 hours of sleep per night. However, how many of us actually do it?

Getting in a routine can make a huge difference. Establish what time you need to go to bed in order to get 8 hours of sleep and allow yourself some time to unwind before you lay down. Put down your electronic devices and read a book or meditate. Allow your mind enough time to relax before you go to sleep.

 

2) Exercise Regularly


This is one of the most important things on this list. When you exercise, you reduce the amount of stress hormones your body produces (cortisol). You will also improve the release of endorphins which can help improve your mood.

Exercise will also help with other aspects of stress reduction, including sleeping better and having a higher self-esteem.

Find exercise that you enjoy. Whether it is playing pickup basketball, running long distances, or weight training, it is important to be active.

 

3) Practice Yoga or Meditation


When you are stressed, your mind is usually racing with all the things you need to do or worrying about something in the future. Both yoga and meditation will help you focus on the moment and your breathing.

Yoga teaches you to join the mind and the body. While there are many different styles, studies have shown that yoga has been effective in reducing cortisol levels and in improving depression and anxiety.

While yoga focuses on joining the mind and body, meditation emphasizes training your mind to focus and redirect your thoughts. This can be extremely effective when your mind is filled, and you are stressed.

 

4) Laugh Often


You may have heard “laughter is the best medicine” and while that may be a stretch in some instances, it is certainly applicable to stress.

Laughter relaxes physical tension and relieves stress. It can leave your whole body relaxed up to 45 minutes afterwards. But it will also trigger the release of endorphins, raising your mood and creating an overall sense of well-being.

When you’re stressed, it can be difficult to laugh. But search out opportunities and don’t take yourself so seriously.

 

5) Write It Down


There are few things as therapeutic as journaling. Now you don’t have to keep a traditional journal; write down what is bothering you and what is going on in your life. This is your chance to vent and release some of that tension onto the paper.

Another way you can alleviate stress is to write down what you are grateful for. Keep a gratitude journal. This will help you stay focused on all the good things in your life and keep things in perspective.

 

6) Utilize Aromatherapy


The use of scents to improve or change your mood is called aromatherapy. While it may seem a little strange, several studies show that aromatherapy can decrease anxiety and improve sleep.

Some of the most relaxing scents include:

  •        Lavender

  •        Vetiver

  •        Cedarwood

  •        Frankincense

  •        Neroli

  •        Orange


Diffuse some essential oils or light a candle in the evening to help ease some of the tension and stress you have accumulated throughout the day.

 

7) Find Engaging Hobbies


You need to find activities where you can destress. Your job isn’t your life so don’t allow all of your responsibilities to define you. Find hobbies that you enjoy. Whether that is learning an instrument, developing a new skill, reading, or hiking, find time to fulfill your inner-self.

Remember, although your job is important, sometimes less is more. You will be far more productive in all aspects of your life when you learn to take a bit of time for yourself and separate your mind from the source of your stress. Find what works for you and note the difference in how you feel and your productivity.




 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Protecting Your Baby from a Measles Outbreak by Colleen Kraft, M.D.

Measles is wildly contagious. How worried should parents be if their baby is too young for the vaccine? Nearly 1 out of every 3 children under the age of 5 who catches measles ends up in the hospital. Are some babies at a greater risk? What, if anything, can parents do to protect their little ones?

Here are some answers from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

How soon can my baby get the measles vaccine?

The recommended age for the first dose of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine is 12 to 15 months of age. If you live in a community experiencing an outbreak, or if you travel internationally, your baby may be vaccinated as early as 6 months of age. Talk with your pediatrician if this applies to you.

Babies who get one dose of MMR vaccine before their first birthday should get two more doses (one dose at 12 through 15 months of age and another dose at least 28 days later).

My baby is too young for the vaccine. Is there anything I can do to protect her?

Wash your hands! Just as you would to prevent germs at any time, use soap and water and scrub for at least 20 seconds. Remind others in your home or anyone who is near your baby to do the same.

Other things that can help:

  • Limit your baby's exposure to crowds, other children, and anyone with colds.

  • Go germ-free. Disinfect objects and surfaces in your home regularly.

  • Feed your baby breastmilk. It has unique antibodiesto prevent and fight infections.


Remember, the measles virus can live for two hours on a surface or suspended in the air.

Babies at a greater risk for catching measles include:

  • Ones under 12 months who have not received the measles vaccine.

  • Ones in a child care setting or living in crowded living conditions.

  • Ones with older siblings.

  • Ones who are not breastfed


If you are planning an international trip, consider your baby's age.

  • Babies less than 6 months old who are too young to be vaccinated may still have some protection from the antibodies from their mother. However, if you are traveling with an infant under 6 months of age to a place with a significant number of measles cases reported, it is worth considering delaying travel as measles can still be very severe in these young infants.

  • Babies 6 to 11 months old should receive the MMR vaccine (and the hepatitis A vaccine), but still require two doses of vaccine at age 12 months or older.

  • Babies 12 months and older should receive their first dose of MMR vaccine in addition to the other vaccines recommended at that age. Infants 12 months and older may also receive a second dose of the MMR vaccine as soon as 28 days after the first dose.


What are the signs and symptoms of measles in babies?

Infants and children can be contagious four days before they even show any symptoms!

Measles typically starts like a bad cold with symptoms such as fever, cough, runny nose, and conjunctivitis (pink eye). A rash then starts to develop on the head and spreads down to the rest of the body. Many children also get ear infections.

While the main symptoms of measles are bad enough, the reason we vaccinate against measles are to prevent the complications associated with it―such as pneumonia and encephalitis (an infection of the brain).

What is the outlook for a child who gets measles?

Not good. In the US, 1-2 out of every 1,000 children who get measles die from it. A similar number of children suffer from encephalitis and many go on to have long-term brain damage. The disease is even more severe in developing countries, where as many as 1 out of 3 children who get measles die from it.

Why don't babies get the MMR shot sooner?

The MMR vaccine is a live vaccine, which means it contains weakened forms of the viruses. In order to work, those weakened forms of the virus need to multiply to create an immune response. Since the natural protection newborns get from their moms wears off gradually over a period of months, the viruses may not be able to multiply the way they would when the baby is a little older. That's why we recommend the first dose of the MMR starting at 12 months of age. Not because it's too dangerous but because that's the age at which the vaccine works best.

What about pregnant moms?

Most women of child-bearing age have been vaccinated against measles, mumps, and rubella―and therefore are protected against these diseases.

If for some reason a pregnant woman was not previously vaccinated against measles, she cannot receive the MMR vaccine until after delivery. This is because the MMR vaccine is prepared with weakened live viruses (in contrast to many vaccines that are prepared with killed viruses), so doctors usually advise avoiding pregnancy for at least one month after receiving the vaccine to reduce the risk of becoming infected.

Do parents and grandparents need a booster MMR shot?

Anyone born before 1957 is generally considered immune to measles. This means they are fully protected from measles for life and no additional vaccination is necessary.

If you're unsure whether you're immune to measles, you should first try to find your vaccination records or documentation of measles immunity. If you do not have written documentation of measles immunity, you should get the MMR vaccine. There is no harm in getting another dose of MMR vaccine if you may already be immune to measles (or mumps or rubella).

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.