Razor Bumps by Your Marque Team

What Are Razor Bumps?

There are two classifications for razor bumps based on causation. Razor bumps that are caused by viral or bacterial infection are known as folliculitis barbae while razor bumps caused by irritation from shaving or ingrown hairs are known as Pseudofolliculitis barbae1, 3, 6.

Who Gets Them?

Razor bumps can happen to both males and females but are more prevalent in males. It is commonly found in the beard area for men. Pseudofolliculitis (shaving bumps) are especially common in people with curly hair because the curly hair grows back into the skin, known as ingrown hair, causing the irritation2. Women can get Pseudofolliculitis in shaved or plucked areas such as the bikini line, armpits, upper lips, and chin.

razor bumpsWhat Causes Razor Bumps?

Bacterial causation of folliculitis barbae is usually due to infection with the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)1. The bacteria can be spread to other hair follicles when the pus-filled spots in the area is cut by razors, causing bleeding and pus drainage 3.

Irritation can be caused by the groin and armpit area rubbing against tight clothing, especially during running.

What Are the Symptoms?

Symptoms usually consist of an itchy or sore area of small red raised swellings (spots) which can sometimes be filled with pus3.

Treatment and Prevention

Self-care treatment includes letting the hair grow without shaving. If you must shave, use an electric shaver that does not cut too close to the skin as well as moisturizing shaving foam. Shave every other day instead of daily. Using a single blade is more preferable than a double blade because a single blade does not cut the hair too short. Sterilizing metal parts of your shaver with boiling water, using disposable razors only once, and thoroughly cleaning any plastic part of your razor that comes in contact with the skin can help to prevent razor bumps. Shaving with the grain (the direction of the hair growth) can also help to prevent razor bumps.

Medical treatments for razor bumps can consist of a topical or oral antibiotics for severe cases with pus and abscess formation4, 5. Other topical medications such as tretinoin and topical combination cream (tretinoin 0.05%, fluocinolone acetonide 0.01%, and hydroquinone 4%) can help by reducing the inflammation and hyperpigmentation due to the inflammation 4,5. A more expensive method to prevent razor bumps is laser hair removal, but please consult your doctor before pursing this option.

References

  1. Oakley, A. and Gomez, J. July 2016. Folliculitis barbae and pseudofolliculitis barbae. DermNet New Zealland. Accessed 04/07/2017. http://www.dermnetnz.org/topics/folliculitis-barbae/

  2. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology (AOCD). Accessed 04/09/2017. Pseudofolliculitis Barbae. http://www.aocd.org/?page=pseudofolliculitisb

  3. British Association of Dermatologists (BAD). Published April 2017. Folliculitis Barbae. Accessed 04/09/20017. http://www.bad.org.uk/shared/get-file.ashx?id=203&itemtype=document

  4. Greidanus, T.G. February 10, 2016. Pseudofolliculitis of the Beard Treatment & Management

  5. Accessed 04/09/2017. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1071251-treatment

  6. British Association of Dermatologists (BAD). Published November 2016. Pseudofolliculitis. Accessed 04/09/20017. http://www.bad.org.uk/shared/get-file.ashx?id=122&itemtype=document


The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Cholesterol by Jennifer Quach

Cholesterol is a white fat-like substance that is found in the cells of our body. It is essential to our health, but too much cholesterol is harmful to our bodies.  Since there are usually no signs of high cholesterol, it is important to check your cholesterol level which varies depending on your age and risk factors. This can be done by getting a blood test.

There are different types of cholesterol known as HDL (High Density Lipoprotein) and LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein).  HDL is known as the "good" cholesterol while LDL is the "bad" cholesterol.  HDL is known as the good cholesterol because it helps protect the body by decreasing the buildup of the LDL in the arteries.  LDL is the bad cholesterol forming a plaque-like substance that can block the natural flow of blood in the coronary arteries which can lead to stroke and heart attacks.

One can lower or improve their cholesterol level by changing their eating habits.  Eating lots of unhealthy fats such as saturated fats can raise LDL levels. Therefore, it is important to avoid fatty meats, dairy products, deep fried foods and processed food (or consume such foods in moderation). While there are foods to avoid, there are foods that we can eat that can lower our cholesterol. Avocados can replace oils and creams which add flavor to your food, but at the same time can help you regulate your bad cholesterol levels (Mayo Clinic). It is also helpful to add high fiber foods to our diet.  It has been proven that foods high in fiber such as fruits, vegetables, brown rice and oatmeal can help lower the "bad" cholesterol by keeping our body from absorbing cholesterol into our bloodstream (Harvard Health). These are just a few, but there are more foods to consider as part of your diet to maintain a healthy level of cholesterol.

Exercising and staying physically active are also ways to maintain a healthy cholesterol level along with a healthy diet. It's important to accommodate any health needs and physical restrictions you may have.  Aerobic exercise or any workout that gets your blood pumping are shown to help raise HDL levels, the "good" cholesterol which help to remove the "bad" cholesterol.

Weight can also be a factor in one's cholesterol level. Being overweight increases your risk of having high LDL "bad" cholesterol, and low HDL "good" cholesterol. Often, just losing weight can help lower cholesterol (WebMD). With the above mentioned, choosing to limit unhealthy fats, eating the right foods, and exercising should also help with lowering one's weight and help your overall cholesterol.

There are other causes or risk factors to having high cholesterol. These include age, heredity, and race. Yet, you should be aware by checking your cholesterol levels and changing your diet, including exercise, and maintaining your weight which are all things one can choose to do to stay healthy. If lifestyle changes do not lower your cholesterol enough, medications may be an option as well.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Happens When You Don’t Have a Bowel Movement? By Thomas Jeffrey Nguyen

Although this topic is not what most people often discuss, it’s very important to understand why and how our body disposes waste normally and abnormally. Doing so, would give us early warnings of significant diseases, such as colon cancer.

In the article, “What Happened if You Don’t Poop for 40 Days?” https://www.livescience.com/61894-what-happens-if-you-dont-poop.html, a 24-year refused to poop for 43 days.  Let us dive into this with a medical perspective.  How to voluntarily retain fecal? Answer:  Patients would tighten the pelvic muscles and buttocks when the urge to defecate strikes.

Results of Fecal Retention according to Gastroenterologist, Lan Lustbader of NYU

  • Colon can become dangerously distended; a condition called Megacolon. (X-rays can show this)

  • Feces can become hard and impacted, resulting in bowel to rupture. (Doctors would use their hands to pull feces out in some patients)

  • Holding back the urge to defecate can slow the feedback mechanism that keeps bowel moving smoothly. (Results in sitting longer on the toilet)

  • Altered bowel motility in the future. (You would require laxatives or alternatives to stimulate your colon)

  • Even with no food, bowel can produce little bit of runny discharge. (Intestinal mucous and fluids)

  • Colon slowdown


Health Article https://commonsensehome.com/whats-a-healthy-bowel-movement/

Tips for better bowel movements without painful constipation or explosive diarrhea:

  • Eat plenty of coconut oil and high quality saturated fats. (Natural lubricants)

  • Eat plenty of veggies, leafy greens, with a moderate amount of fruits. (Good ratio of fiber and water)

  • Stay hydrated (~ 4 glasses a day)

  • Eat and drink plenty of probiotic foods and beverages. (We lose digestive enzymes as we age)

  • AVOID highly processed food. (Lack bulk, meaning not smooth and sticks to everything)

  • Try squatting. (Helps guts line up correctly to pass more easily)


 



Aim for type 4 stool. Type 3 has latent constipation.

 

Source: https://www.livescience.com/61894-what-happens-if-you-dont-poop.html

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
woman in yoga pose at end of boardwalk

The Many Health Benefits of Yoga by Your Marque Team

woman in yoga pose near oceanIt seems as though workout fads come and go as often as the seasons. Yet one workout that has sustained popularity throughout the years is yoga. Yoga has been practiced for over 5,000 years and is still one of the most commonly used and popular workouts today.

Yoga is a workout that combines strengthening and stretching poses with deep, controlled breathing and meditation or relaxation. It is known to not only burn calories and tone muscles, but it is also a total mind-body workout. There are more than 100 different styles of yoga varying in intensity, making it easy for anyone to start their own regimen. The easiest and most familiar form of yoga is known as Hatha. Hatha is combination of basic movements with breathing. One of the most intense styles of yoga is known as Bikram. Bikram is also known as “hot yoga,“ which is a series of 26 of the most challenging poses performed inside of a heated room.

One of the greatest benefits of yoga is stress relief; stress negatively affects your mind and body in many different ways. Stress can have devastating effects on your thoughts, feelings, and even your behavior. Unfortunately, many people do not recognize how the effects of stress they endure in a day or even within their lifetime can profoundly impact their health. Stress can cause anxiousness, restlessness, lack of motivation, irritability and even sadness and depression. Even the simplest yoga poses can help eliminate many of these issues.

In addition to stress relief, yoga also helps to increase strength by using arm, leg, and back muscles to maintain each pose. Body weight training is one of the best ways to get you lean and fit and it’s also good for your muscles, joints, and bones.  Yoga can also increase flexibility by regularly stretching your muscles and increasing range of motion. It is also said to lower blood pressure, improve heart rate and general awareness. Many people who regularly practice yoga have even reported that the exercise can even help with depression and even diabetes and the negative effects it can have on the body.

ADDITIONAL REASONS TO DO YOGA:



  • Yoga helps you stay connected to yourself. In the fast pace of everyday life in Western culture, it is very easy to put our personal needs on the back burner-yoga helps us to pay more attention to what our body is telling us and brings about a greater sense of self-awareness.

  • It improves sleep- even a simple 10 minute practice before bed can lead to a more restful sleep.

  • In the same way, morning yoga practice allows us to gently wake up the muscles and digestive system, and to check in with ourselves before diving into our busy day.

  • Yoga helps to fight against ailments associated with chronic overexertion such as inflammation, migraines and fatigue.

  • Yoga classes serve as a great way to meet like-minded people in a positive environment.

  • Yoga is approachable-with so many different styles of yoga, there is a level and fit for people of all ages and abilities.

  • A commitment to yoga typically results in more conscious food choices-we become more inclined to nourish ourselves physically and mentally.

  • A regular practice often makes people look more youthful. This can be attributed to the improved circulation that the stretches ignite.


 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

Strep Throat by Raymar Bituin

Strep throat is a bacterial infection which causes an inflammation and pain in the throat. This can make your throat feel sore and create difficulties in swallowing. The cause of strep throat is bacteria known as Streptococcus pyogenes which is also known as group A streptococcus. Strep bacteria are airborne and can spread when someone with the infection sneezes or coughs and it may also spread through foods and drinks.

Symptoms of strep throat:

  • Throat pain

  • Difficulty swallowing

  • Fever

  • Headache

  • Swollen lymph nodes

  • White patches on tonsils

  • Rash

  • Body aches


 

Strep throat is a common condition in children, but it also affects people of all ages. It is important to treat strep throat. If untreated strep throat can cause complications such as kidney inflammation of rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever can lead to inflamed joints. If you are diagnosed with strep you will need antibiotic to treat the infection. You may also try at home remedies. Drinking warm liquids such as tea, lemon water and using a humidifier will also help.

To prevent strep infection, you must clean your hands properly using soap and water. Don’t share drinking glasses or utensils and don’t forget to wash dishes. Finally, cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze. All these steps can help you and your children from getting strep throat.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Does My Child Need an Antibiotic? By Colleen Kraft, M.D.

Parents need to know that using antibiotics when they are not the right medicine will not help and may even cause harm to children.

Antibiotics are medicines used to treat infections and they target bacteria, not viruses. Before prescribing an antibiotic, your child's doctor will find out if it is the right medicine to treat your child's infection.

  1.  My child has a really bad cold. Why won't the doctor prescribe an antibiotic?  


Colds are caused by viruses. Antibiotics are used specifically for infections caused by bacteria. In general, most common cold symptoms—such as runny nose, cough, and congestion—are mild and your child will get better without using any medicines.

  1.  Don't some colds turn into bacterial infections? So why wait to start an antibiotic?  




In most cases, bacterial infections do not follow viral infections. Using antibiotics to treat viral infections may instead lead to an infection caused by resistant bacteria. Also, your child may develop diarrhea or other side effects. If your child develops watery diarrhea, diarrhea with blood in it, or other side effects while taking an antibiotic, call your child's doctor.

  1.  Isn't a nose draining yellow or green mucus a sign of a bacterial infection?  


During a common cold, it is normal for mucus from the nose to get thick and to change from clear to yellow or green. Symptoms often last for 10 days.

Sinusitis is a term that means inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses. A virus or allergy can cause sinusitis and in some cases, bacteria can be the cause.

There are certain signs that bacteria may be involved in your child's respiratory illness. If your child has a common cold with cough and green mucus that lasts longer than 10 days, or if your child has thick yellow or green mucus and a fever higher than 102°F (39°C) for at least 3 or 4 days, this may be a sign of bacterial sinusitis.

  1.  Aren't antibiotics needed to treat ear infections?  


Not all ear infections are treated with antibiotics. At least half of all ear infections go away without antibiotics. If your child does not have a high fever or severe ear pain, your child's doctor may recommend observation initially. Pain is often the first and most uncomfortable symptom of ear infection, your child's doctor will suggest pain medicine to ease your child's pain. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen are over-the-counter pain medicines that may help lessen much of the pain. Be sure to use the right dose for your child's age and size. In most cases, pain and fever will improve within the first 1 to 2 days.

There are also ear drops that may help ear pain for a short time. You can ask your child's doctor if your child should use these drops. Over-the-counter cold medicines (decongestants and antihistamines) don't help clear up ear infections and are not recommended for young children. Your child's doctor may prescribe antibiotics if your child has fever that is increasing, more severe ear pain, and infection in both eardrums.

  1.  Aren't antibiotics used to treat all sore throats?  


​​No. More than 80% of sore throats are caused by a virus. If your child has sore throat, runny nose, and a barky cough, a virus is the likely cause and a test for "strep" is not needed and should not be performed. Antibiotics should only be used to treat sore throats caused by group A streptococci. Infection caused by this type of bacteria is called "strep throat." Strep throat generally affects school-aged children and not children younger than 3 years. If your child's doctor suspects strep throat based on your child's symptoms, a strep test should always be performed. If the test is positive, antibiotics will be prescribed.

  1.  Do antibiotics cause any side effects?  


Side effects can occur in 1 out of every 10 children who take an antibiotic. Side effects may include rashes, allergic reactions, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain. Make sure you let your child's doctor know if your child has had a reaction to antibiotics.  Sometimes a rash will occur during the time a child is taking an antibiotic. However, not all rashes are considered allergic reactions. Tell your child's doctor if you see a rash that looks like hives (red welts); this may be an allergic reaction. If your child has an allergic reaction that causes an itchy rash, or hives, this will be noted in her medical record.

  1.  How long does it take an antibiotic to work?  


Most bacterial infections improve within 48 to 72 hours of starting an antibiotic. If your child's symptoms get worse or do not improve within 72 hours, call your child's doctor. If your child stops taking the antibiotic too soon, the infection may not be treated completely and the symptoms may start again.

  1.  Can antibiotics lead to resistant bacteria?  


The repeated use and misuse of antibiotics can lead to resistant bacteria. Resistant bacteria are bacteria that are no longer killed by the antibiotics commonly used to treat bacterial infection. These resistant bacteria can also be spread to other children and adults.

It is important that your child use the antibiotic that is most specific for your child's infection rather than an antibiotic that would treat a broader range of infections.  If your child does develop an antibiotic-resistant infection, a special type of antibiotic may be needed. Sometimes, these medicines need to be given by IV (vein) in the hospital.

  1.  How can I use antibiotics safely?



  • Antibiotics aren't always the answer when your child is sick. Ask your child's doctor what the best treatment is for your child.

  • Ask your child's doctor if the antibiotic being prescribed is the best for your child's type of bacterial infection. For instance, certain antibiotics such as azithromycin are no longer effective for the bacteria causing most ear and sinus infections.

  • Antibiotics work against bacterial infections. They don't work on colds and flu.

  • Make sure that you give the medicine exactly as directed.

  • Don't use one child's antibiotic for a sibling or friend; you may give the wrong medicine and cause harm.

  • Throw away unused antibiotics. Do not save antibiotics for later use; some out-of-date medicines can actually be harmful. Call Poison Help at 1-800-222-1222 or check the US Food and Drug Administration Web site for information on the safe disposal of medicines.


The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Chlamydia by Sara Morrison

Chlamydia is a very common, sexually transmitted disease in both women and men.  It can cause permanent damage to a women’s reproductive system.  It can make it impossible or challenging for a woman to become pregnant later in life.  Some women with chlamydia can have an ectopic pregnancy, which is when the pregnancy occurs outside the womb.

According to a 2017 article from the Center for Disease Control, “younger people are more at risk to get chlamydia by anal, vaginal, and or oral sex.”  Sexually active younger people are more are at a higher risk because of common behaviors between young people.  Bisexuals and other males are at risk due to oral and anal sex.  Chlamydia does not depend on your gender since it can be spread in many ways.  Anyone is susceptible to chlamydia if they have unprotected sex.

It’s known that most people don’t even know that they have chlamydia.  Most individuals don’t have any symptoms.  Even with no symptoms showing, it can disrupt the reproductive system in women.  And if you become pregnant while the individual has chlamydia, it can be passed to the child during birth.  Chlamydia can also cause premature birth in some women.  Treatment and testing are the ways to avoid this situation.

Some symptoms of chlamydia for women are:  burning sensation while urinating and abnormal discharge.  Symptoms for a male can include swelling and pain in one or both testicles, a discharge from the head of the penis, and possible a burning pain when urinating. Women and men can also get chlamydia in their rectum.  This occurs when having anal sex or having unprotected vaginal sex and then having anal sex.  Some of the symptoms of having anal chlamydia bleeding, rectal pain, and a discharge.

If a person does not treat chlamydia or it goes unnoticed it can cause serious medical problems.  It’s known that men rarely have any medical issues if the chlamydia goes untreated.  If a male does have any symptoms it occurs when the infection goes up the tube that carries the sperm from the testicles, which can be painful and cause a fever.  For women, how ever it can cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID).  This disease can cause a woman to have an ectopic pregnancy which the fertilized egg can not pass through the fallopian tubes and becomes stuck.  This can be dangerous and even fatal.  It can also cause a woman to become infertile for the rest of her life.  PID can also make a woman have permanent pelvic pain.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

Antibiotics and Overuse

A simple search on Google for the term “antibiotic”, yields the following definition: a medicine (such as penicillin or its derivatives) that inhibits the growth of, or destroys microorganisms. Plainly, antibiotics kill bacteria; the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections is prevalent in medicine because it is highly effective. However, despite the inherent nature of antibiotics to be very effective, considerations should be made so that medical professionals do not add to the problem of overuse that is quickly ballooning into what may be the standard, when in fact, it should be the opposite.

Antibiotics do not treat viral illnesses. Upper respiratory infections among children are mostly viral in nature, but studies show that half of the antibiotics that are being prescribed to pediatric patients are being used to treat upper respiratory infections related to the common cold. There is increased susceptibility to antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria such as Clostridium difficile among children who are prescribed antibiotics for a simple upper respiratory infection. A CDC study concluded that, “71 of percent children who suffered C. diff infections had been given courses of antibiotics for respiratory, ear, and nose illnesses 12 weeks before infection”.  Fourteen thousand deaths occur yearly among children and adults because of C. diff infections causing severe diarrhea which can be life-threatening. Also, C. diff is the root cause for 250,000 infections of hospitalized patients.

The overuse of antibiotics is also detrimental in the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) such as gonorrhea, which is the “second most commonly reported notifiable disease in the United States”. There were 350,062 cases of gonorrhea reported in 2014 leading to an increase in the national gonorrhea rate of 110.7 cases per 100,000 population. According to the CDC, the reported rate of gonorrhea has significantly climbed since 2009 with an average rate of 98.1 per 100,000 population. The number of cases reported rose 10.5% since 2010. It is becoming harder and harder to treat this STD due to increasing drug resistance. There is causal relation between antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea and health related problems such as pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, tubal infertility, eye infections, and many other diseases.

Not only does the inappropriate use of antibiotics weigh heavily against fighting many infections, but it is also taxing on the US health care system and it burdens the many patients and families who access that care. Yearly, there are nearly two million Americans who suffer hospital acquired infections (HAI) from antibacterial pathogens in the hospital setting because of the high occupancy of vulnerable patients, the prevalence of invasive procedures, and the high rates of antibiotic use. Of those 2 million who acquire a HAI, a staggering 99,000 Americans died. The US health care system in 2006 was burdened with a cost of $8 billion when two common HAIs, sepsis and pneumonia, were found to be the cause of death for 50,000 Americans. Antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria may force providers to use other antibiotics that prove to be highly effective, but are toxic to patients and are very expensive. Data has also shown that patients who are undergoing treatment for high antibiotic-resistant strains of infections, incur longer stays at the hospital. The average patient in this group incurs a prolonged stay of 6.4 to 12.7 days equating to 8 million days.

What can be done to combat the misuse or inappropriate use of antibiotics? The FDA and CDC recommend the public be made aware on the proper use of antibiotics. Antibiotics should not be used to treat illnesses that are viral in nature. Also, the FDA advocates research on development for new types of antibiotics to help in the fight against antibiotic-resistant strains of infections.

References

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/five-unintended-consequences-antibiotic-overuse-031114#1

https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats14/gonorrhea.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4378521/

https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm092810.htm

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Q. and A. with Dr. Kiskila- This Month’s Topic: Dandruff

dr. kiskilaQuestion- Dr. Kiskila, what is a dandruff?

Answer- Dandruff is a mild case of seborrheic dermatitis which is a skin condition that causes white flakes or scaly patches on the skin of your head or hair.

Question- How do I get dandruff?

Answer- Dandruff typically affects areas with many oil glands on the head that get hot and sweaty. There are other variables that could contribute to dandruff as well such as:

  • Brushing hair infrequently- When you brush your hair, you help assist the natural shedding of skin.

  • Dry skin

  • Seborrheic dermatitis- irritated skin that is oily.

  • Shampooing too frequently- the scalp could become irritated.

  • Winter cold weather combined with overheated rooms can cause scalp to become flaky and itchy.


 

Question- What are the symptoms of dandruff?

Answer- Itching, scaly flakes or patches on skin that can look greasy or oily.

Question- What is the treatment for dandruff?

Answer- Sometimes dandruff will resolve on its own and no treatment is necessary. Using an over-the-counter anti-dandruff shampoo is all that is needed to treat dandruff. Using over the counter hydrocortisone steroid cream to treat itching and redness if often enough to help symptoms resolve. In some cases, a prescription strength antifungal shampoo is needed to treat dandruff. Skin creams and ointments that have antifungal medications and or steroid medicines can stop itching and redness.

Question- How do I prevent getting dandruff?

Answer- Keeping your head dry and clean and less oily.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.