Health Benefits of Pumpkin by Your Marque Team

Fall is here - which also means pumpkin season! But there's more to pumpkins than pie- pumpkins offer many health benefits! Both fresh and canned pumpkin are packed with so many healthy nutrients.  Here are some reasons why incorporating more pumpkin into your diet might be a wise and healthful idea:

  • Pumpkins are that delicious orange color because of beta-carotene, which is an antioxidant that turns into vitamin A in the body. Beta-carotene is essential for healthy eyes and has also been linked to preventing coronary artery disease.

  • Pumpkin seeds are so nutritious! They're packed with protein, magnesium, zinc, iron, and potassium. Studies show that these seeds aid in blocking the enlargement of the prostate gland, lowering the risk of bladder stones, lowering cholesterol and lowering high blood pressure. They may even prevent some types of cancers due to the prominent levels of phytosterols (a group of compounds found in plants).




  • Eating pumpkin may aid in weight loss. Pumpkins and their seeds are low in calories and a high source of fiber, which keeps you full longer. Feeling full longer means beating those cravings and lessening the desire to snack too much. Eating a high-fiber diet boosts the metabolism, also aiding in weight loss.

  • Consuming pumpkin improves your complexion. Pumpkin contains lots of fruit enzymes and AHAs, which increase cell turnover, helping to brighten and smooth skin. It also contains antioxidants, which boosts collagen production and prevents wrinkles.

  • Eating pumpkin helps you sleep sounder! Pumpkin seeds contain tryptophan, the amino acid that contributes to that post-Thanksgiving dinner grogginess. Tryptophan makes you sleepy, but also helps the body produce serotonin, which is a calming neurotransmitter.


Try incorporating more pumpkin into your diet in a healthy way, like roasting cubes of it or sprinkling the seeds on top of your salad or morning yogurt parfait. Pumpkin is so versatile; the possibilities are endless! Have a happy and healthy pumpkin season!

References: https://www.curejoy.com/content/health-benefits-of-pumpkin/, https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/6-surprising-health-benefits-of-pumpkin#1, https://dailyburn.com/life/health/pumpkin-health-benefits/

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

MRSA by Kristen Torres

MRSA is the super bug that you hope you never get. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA, is an infection that is caused by a staph bacterium that becomes resistant to the majority of antibiotics that typically treat staph infections. MRSA is usually found in the health-care environment. Most of the patients that contract MRSA in the healthcare setting is due to invasive procedures or foreign body devices. MRSA can also be contracted outside the healthcare environment. People at risk are typically childcare workers, high school wrestlers, and people living in extremely congested areas, due to the spreading of skin to skin contact. MRSA, just like any other staph infection, begin as swollen, painful red bumps.

mrsa

The affected area typically resembles pimples and they usually present themselves as:

  • warm to the touch

  • full of pus or other drainage

  • typically accompanied by a fever


However, these simple pimples can quickly turn into deep, painful abscesses that would require surgical draining. In rare cases, the bacteria can surpass the skin barrier and go deep into the body, causing infection to the bones, joints, surgical wounds, the blood stream, heart valves and the lungs. MRSA can be treated through medication, even though it is resistant to majority of antibiotics.

Prevention of MRSA is essential, especially in the healthcare environment because it is so easily spread.

Forms of prevention include:comic

  • washing your hands

  • cleansing the rooms and equipment

  • keeping MRSA patients isolated from non-MRSA patients

  • always using personal protective equipment (PPE)


 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 
young woman cleaning her face with cotton

Stop These 5 Common Skin Care Mistakes by Your Marque Team

 

 

Skin care is extremely important and it can be hard to keep track of if we aren’t careful. At Marque Medical, we want to give you a few tips in order to help you feel comfortable in your own skin.

 

What do I need?


You first need to understand that it takes work to keep your skin healthy and clean. It isn’t too much to handle. You don’t need products, you just need to stop yourself from doing these mistakes.

 

What are the mistakes?


We have 5 different mistakes that commonly happen for everyone. Look closely and be honest with yourself. Do you do them?

 

1) Going to bed without removing your makeup


It’s late and you’re simply exhausted; it’s an understandable mistake. However, “Not removing your makeup for the night clogs your pore and oil glands,” says Dennis Gross MD. He goes on to explain how leaving your makeup expands your pores and it’ll take them longer to shrink back to their normal size.

 

2) Popping your pimples and picking at your face


Why wouldn’t you pop your pimples/zits? Picking at your face has probably become a habit. But doing these two things will only create scars and tear your skin. Instead of squeezing the pimple, get a washcloth and wash your face when the pimple is ready to come out. That should be all that it takes.

 

3) Not sleeping enough or being stressed


tired woman rubbing her browSleep and stress need to be balanced. These two priorities need to be high on your list because of how many other things they affect. One, in particular, is your skin. Thus, we encourage you to get more than 6 hours of sleep each night. As for stress, find what is the cause of your stress and find ways to remove that stress from your life, even if it means seeking professional help.  

 

4) Hair on your face


Most of us like having bangs or even have hair in our face. It’s beautiful. However, you must understand that using hairspray will cause breakouts to happen when your hair rests on your face. Breakouts can also come when your hair and its oils rest on your face because your hair is out as you sleep.

 

5) Dehydration or skipping a meal


If you aren’t treating your body well, don’t expect it to function to as it should. Thus, you must realize the importance of drinking and eating well. Water will help your skin’s elasticity and softness. Whenever you skip a meal, eat greasy foods, or are dehydrated, you are starving your skin of nutrients.

 

Now what?


Make a plan! It’s as easy as that. You may not realize how these 5 things affect your skin, but try it out and see how as you stop doing these things, it affects your skin.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Put the Pep Back into Your Step – B12 Shots by Your Marque Team

Are you feeling fatigue or lethargic? Maybe faint or dizzy? You might be experiencing vitamin B12 deficiency. Many patients suffer the symptoms from vitamin B12 deficiency and might not even know it.  Vitamin B12 is an essential water-soluble vitamin that:

  • Helps in the functioning of DNA synthesis

  • Energy production

  • Neurological function

  • Red blood cell formation

  • And much more.


Some patients are unable to break down the protein to absorb vitamin B12 into the bloodstream while others are at risk for low levels of B12 because of the food consumed don’t contain high enough amounts of B12, such as vegetarians or vegans. Patients can also be at risk for low levels of B12 if they are taking certain medications such as antacids or antihistamines, which can block the absorption of B12.

What can vitamin B12 do for me?

Vitamin B12 is a crucial vitamin needed for metabolic and hormonal functions. It helps with the production of our digestive enzymes and the transporting of nutrients in and out of our cells. Other roles of vitamin B12 is that it helps in the conversion of homocysteine to methionine, which protects cardiovascular health, metabolizing protein and fat, and it also plays a role in fetal development during pregnancy. The benefits of getting B12 shots every month is that it reduces the risk of:

  • Heart disease

  • Vision loss

  • Infertility

  • Neurocognitive disorders


Other beneficial factors to getting the B12 shot is that it:

  • Can reduce depression by restoring mood control and helps aid in retaining memory and mental functions

  • Helps lower fatigue and reduces muscle weakness

  • Can help improve metabolism

  • Help improve low sperm count

  • Help prevent or treat diabetic neuropathy


The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Tips to Alleviate Gastrointestinal (GI) Stress by Your Marque Team

Are you having digestive issues?  Here are some user-friendly tips to help alleviate GI stress:

Fiber helps with constipation.  Cherries, grapes, bell peppers, beans, whole grains and nuts are rich in fiber.  They all help keep your digestion regular.  Your body needs around 20-35 grams of fiber daily.  It also helps keep away weight gain, heart disease, blood sugar (high or low) and hemorrhoids.

Chew gum to help fight heartburn.  It may relieve reflux by stimulating the production of acid neutralizing saliva.   Just make sure to chew every other flavor besides peppermint.

Lose weight to cut gas and heartburn.  Loose just 2 pounds and you could improve gastrointestinal symptoms.  Extra pounds especially around the midsection can worsen digestive issues like heartburn, gas and belching.

Stop bloating and heartburn with smaller meals.  It’s a good way to stop indigestion.  The key is to eat smaller and more frequent meals and eat slower.  It avoids overloading your digestive system and helps shrink stomach capacity.

Drink to stop constipation.  Drinking fluids helps your body get rid of waste to help with constipation.  Eight glasses a day is not enough, drink as much as possible throughout your day.

Get moving to beat bloating.  It may help with most minor digestive problems from bloating to constipation.  Physical activity helps your body’s digestive system.  It moves things and eliminates waste.  It also helps reduce stress a prime irritant of any digestive problems.

Stop smoking to beat heartburn.  When you smoke you wreak havoc on digestion in many ways.  Smoking weakens the valve at the end of the esophagus, which can lead to acid reflux and heart burn.  It also increases the risk for various gastrointestinal cancers.

Drink less alcohol to ease stomach issues.  Alcohol interferes with acid secretion, stomach muscles, and nutrient absorption.  Too many drinks can contribute to heartburn, diarrhea, liver problems and even esophageal cancers.

Maybe dairy is the problem.  Some people find that their bodies can’t digest lactose, the natural sugar in milk.  As a result gas buildup is in your stomach.  Eliminating anything dairy related can help relieve gas issues.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Q. and A. with Dr. Kiskila- This Month’s Topic: Back to School and Sports Physicals

Question: Dr. Kiskila what are back to school and sports physicals?

Answer: Back to school sport physicals are a physical medical exam with a doctor to evaluate that the student is healthy enough to participate in school-related physical activities. They are often referred to as back to school exams, because they are typically done at the beginning of the school year and are valid for the entire school year, but they can be done anytime.  Ideally, sports physicals should be done 6 weeks before preseason practice begins.

Question: Who needs them?

Answer: Any student who participates in sports should have a physical once a year.

Question: What do you check and assess during these physicals?

Answer: Doctors check the student’s vital signs like blood pressure and heart rate to make sure they are healthy enough to participate in sports. We assess the heart and lungs for any murmurs or wheezing for asthma. Doctors also assess the student’s muscular and skeletal range of motion, and perform a neurological exam to check reflexes, pupil dilation, and vision. We palpate the abdomen to assess abdominal organs such as the spleen. Additionally, we look at the patient's ears, nose and throat. For males, we may need to check for a hernia by pressing on the groin area. We also review the student athlete’s personal and family medical history and answer any questions. We want the students to be healthy, active and successful as they participate in their sports.

Question: Are there particular questions that parents should ask the physician during the exam?

Answer: Back to school and sports physicals are a terrific opportunity to not only ask activity-related questions, but to also inquire about the child's overall health.

Question: What occurs after the exam?

Answer: If the doctor determines that that child is healthy and safe to participate, he will fill out a clearance form for the family to give to the school.  If the child needs further testing before they can be cleared to play, next steps will be scheduled for the second evaluation.  The objective is to get the young athlete healthy and fit to participate as soon as possible.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
 

 

Children and Fractures by Colleen Kraft, M.D.



Although the term fracture may sound serious, it is just another name for a broken bone. Fractures are a very common injury among children under age six. Falls cause most of the fractures in this age group.

A broken bone in a child is different from one in an adult, because young bones are more flexible and have a thicker covering, which makes them better able to absorb shock. Children’s fractures rarely require surgical repair. They usually just need to be kept free of movement, most often through the use of a molded cast.

Most broken bones in children are either “greenstick” fractures, in which the bone bends like green wood and breaks only on one side, or “torus” fractures, in which the bone is buckled and twisted but not completely broken. A “bend” fracture refers to a bone that is bent but not broken. “Complete” fractures, in which the bone breaks all the way through, also occur in young children.

There are three types of fractures that may require surgery. A “displaced” fracture, where the ends are separated or out of alignment, an elbow fracture, or a fracture through the child’s growth plate (an area at the end of the bone that regulates further growth) may require surgery and longer term follow up by an orthopedic surgeon.

Fractures also are classified as “non-displaced,” when the broken ends are still in proper position, or “displaced,” when the ends are separated or out of alignment. In an “open” or “compound” fracture, the bone sticks through the skin. If the skin is intact, the fracture is “closed.”

Signs and Symptoms:

It’s not always easy to tell when a bone is broken, especially if your child is too young to describe what he’s feeling. Ordinarily with a fracture, you will see swelling and your child will clearly be in pain and unable—or unwilling—to move the injured limb. However, just because your child can move the bone doesn’t necessarily rule out a fracture.

Home Treatment—Until your child can be examined:

  1. You can use an ice pack with a child older than two; cold can cause skin injury to the delicate skin of younger children.

  2. Do not give the child anything by mouth to drink or relieve pain without first consulting your doctor.

  3. If part of the injury is open and bleeding, or if bone is protruding through the skin, place firm pressure on the wound; then cover it with clean (preferably sterile) gauze. Do not try to put the bone back underneath the skin. Call 911 and let paramedics supervise transportation and help make your child comfortable.

  4. Until your child can be seen in the pediatrician’s office, emergency room, or urgent care center, use an improvised sling or rolled-up newspaper or magazine as a splint to protect the injury from unnecessary movement.


 

Professional Treatment:

After examining the break, the doctor will order X rays to determine the extent of the damage. If the doctor suspects that the bone’s growth plate is affected, or if the bones are out of line, an orthopedic consultation will be necessary.

Because children’s bones heal rapidly and well, a plaster or fiberglass cast, or sometimes just an immobilizing splint, is all that is needed for most minor fractures. For a displaced fracture, an orthopedic surgeon may have to realign the bones. This may be done as a “closed reduction,” in which the surgeon uses local or general anesthesia, manipulates the bones until they’re straight, and then applies a cast. An “open reduction” is a surgical procedure done in an operating room, but this is rarely necessary for children.

Usually casting brings a decrease in pain. If your child has an increase in pain, numbness, or pale or blue fingers or toes, call your doctor immediately. These are signs of swelling. To relieve the pressure, the doctor may split the cast, open a window in it, or replace it with a larger one. You should also let your doctor know if the cast breaks or become wet and soggy, as the cast needs to be intact to help the bone heal.

Bones that have been broken will sometimes form a hard knot at the site of the break during the healing process. As the bone remodels, it will resume its normal shape within in a few months.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Is Your Preschooler Ready for Kindergarten? By Colleen Kraft, M.D.

Your child's social, emotional, academic and behavior skills are equally critical to school success, and too many U.S. children start kindergarten without them.

What does "school readiness" mean?

The idea that some children are "ready for school" by 4 or 5 and others are not is controversial. Just as children begin to walk or talk at different ages, they also develop the psychological and social skills needed for school at varying ages.

When you're deciding when your child should start kindergarten:

  • Look carefully at your child's development. Is your child able to communicate? How are his listening and social skills? Would he be able to get along with other children and adults? Is he toilet trained? What about physical skills like running, playing, or using a crayon or pencil?  

  • TA word about kindergarten screenings or readiness testing:


Some schools may conduct their own tests to evaluate your child's abilities. So-called "readiness tests" tend to look mostly at academic skills, but may evaluate other aspects of development, too. The tests are far from perfect; some children who do poorly on them do just fine in school.

So, if the test or screening identifies some areas where your child seems to lag behind, use the information to help you and the school plan for the special attention he may need in the year of kindergarten ahead.

You are your child's best advocate. By sharing information with your child's teacher and other school staff, you can help them be ready for your child. At the same time, you are establishing a partnership for your child's education that can and should continue throughout her childhood.

School readiness milestones

Important development milestones that help school go smoothly for children include:

Sensory development―the ability to use touch, sight, and hearing to explore and figure out the world around them.

Social, emotional, and behavioral development―such as being able to:

  • focus and pay attention

  • control impulses and emotions

  • take turns

  • cooperate and follow directions

  • make friends

  • empathize with others

  • control and communicate emotions

  • limit aggressive behaviors


Early language, literacy, and math skills― such as being able to talk, listen, and understand concepts like sound-letter associations, numbers, shapes, and how objects are related to each other.

How to promote school readiness:

Let Your Children See You Reading

If your children see you reading regularly, there is a good chance that they will follow your lead and sit down with a book themselves. Set aside some time to talk with them about what each of you is reading. If you have been regularly reading aloud to your children, by school age they'll probably want to read aloud to you, too!

Talk About Your Day

Find time to talk with your children about your respective days—in­cluding what they did at school. Even on a night when you are particularly busy, you should still be able to find a time and place to talk. This gives your children a chance to re-teach you what they learned that day.

Encourage Art & Writing

It is great for children to write and/or draw without any ed­ucational purpose in mind other than to express themselves. For example, you can encourage your children to write original stories, cards, letters, and invitations to friends and relatives. Keep paper, pencils, crayons, markers, and tape in a convenient lo­cation so your children can sit down and use them easily. Research has shown that writing improves a child's reading skills—and vice versa.

Plan One-on-One Time with your child

Plan some activities that you can do with your child—such as an art project. Keep phone call interruptions and media use to a minimum during this special time. Make it a time you are spending with each other. Some children say they wish they could call their parents on the phone, because a phone call or mobile device always gets first priority.

"Educational" Apps: Use with caution

Even though tablets, computer games, and apps are advertised as "educational," the truth is most of them have not been tested to show that children actually learn from them. They teach very basic skills, so don't assume an "interactive" game will be a good learning experience. Children learn better through creative playtime—where their brain takes the lead, not the app or computer game.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.