Probiotics by Carlos Perez

Probiotics have been known to help the human body in many ways and they have become a popular supplement in recent years.  They are live bacteria and yeasts that can bolster your digestive system.  Probiotics may offer benefits and relief from minor to serious conditions such as diarrhea, constipation, vaginal and urinary tract infections, and IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), Crohn's disease, and bladder cancer. Different stains of these live micro-organisms offer different health benefits from oral health to intestinal and weight gain prevention.

Antibiotics kill the "good" bacteria in your body.  It can be a helpful to consume probiotics when you are done with your medication to replenish the "good" bacteria to keep your body functioning properly.

Probiotics are in demand, and as a result, the price of these supplements have increased.  Although many different types of supplements are available, it’s significant to note that there are foods which contain natural forms of probiotics.  This is a cost-effective way to get a similar result without having to swallow a daily pill.  There are a variety of foods that contain probiotics to choose from such as yogurt, sauerkraut, miso, cottage cheese, kefir, sauerkraut, tempeh, kimchi, kombucha, and pickles.

It is important to keep in mind that our bodies work differently; one type of probiotic which helps one person may not be as beneficial for another. Be sure to get informed and educated on which probiotic will be more beneficial for your needs. There are numerous brands available – a doctor can provide insightful knowledge to help you select a probiotic that will yield the most benefits for your health.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Back to School Vaccines by Your Marque Team

As we approach the beginning of a new school year, we must consider California’s law requiring all students to show proof of certain vaccinations before enrolling in classes. This law applies to students of all ages from preschool to college.  Immunization requirements are intended to reduce the risk of spreading vaccine-preventable diseases.

By the definition, a vaccine is a suspension of organisms or a fraction of organisms used to induce immunity. There are two types of vaccines:

  • Attenuated vaccines which contain live organisms that are less virulent.

  • Inactivated vaccines which contain either inactive microbe, toxin, or a few proteins from the pathogen.


Most of vaccines have to be given multiple times in order to be fully effective, and some of them have to be repeated periodically. Based on statistics, since vaccines have become available, the spread of different diseases has dropped significantly. By vaccinating your children, you not only protect them from life-threatening illnesses but you also protect your whole family and friends.

The majority of vaccines are administered to newborn babies within the first two years of their life, in order to build up their immunity. By the time your child starts preschool he or she should receive:

  • 4 doses of Tdap. This vaccine protects from three different bacteria: tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Each of them can lead to very serious diseases or even death. Tetanus enters the body through cuts or broken skin and causes severe muscle pain and "locking" of the jaw. The other two bacteria are airborne, spread by coughing or sneezing. Since the vaccine has been available, according to CDC, the spread of bacteria dropped as much as 90%. However, just last year more than 48,000 Americans suffered from whooping cough, caused by pertussis because they did not receive the vaccine.

  • 3 doses of Hepatitis B vaccine, given within a 6 month period. This vaccine protects from liver disease caused by the Hepatitis B virus. The number of individuals suffering from Hepatitis B disease drastically decreased since 1990, when the vaccine began being routinely administered to children.

  • 2 doses of MMR. Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) are airborne viruses that can cause rash, headache, muscle pain and may lead to seizures, brain damage or even death. All three diseases were very common among children before the vaccine became available.

  • 3 doses of Polio. This disease was very common before 1955, when Polio vaccine was introduced to the public. It is spread by direct contact with an infected person, and causes paralysis leading to permanent disability or death.

  • 1 dose of Varicella. This vaccine protects from chickenpox and it was approved for administration in 1995.

  • 3 doses of Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae type B) vaccine, which prevents meningitis, pneumonia, and throat infections.


Before you enroll your child in kindergarten, in addition to the vaccines listed above, he or she will need another dose of DTaP and Polio.

Middle school students must receive:

  • Tdap vaccine. This vaccine was approved for administration in 2005, in place of TD (Tetanus and Diphtheria). Children have to be vaccinated before they enter seventh grade because by this time the immunity that was induced by DTaP in earlier years has worn off.  In fact, Tdap and TD vaccines should be repeated every 10 years to be fully effective. Tdap should be also given to the individuals who work with children or have contact with newborn babies.

  • HPV vaccination, also known as Gardasil, is another recommended vaccine for middle school children, however, not required. According to the CDC, more than half of men and women in the United States, who are sexually active, have been infected with HPV - human papillomavirus. For the most part, the virus does not cause many severe symptoms and can self-resolve. However, it may lead to cervical cancer in women and throat cancer in both men and women. Therefore, in order to prevent those types of cancers, individuals should be given the HPV vaccine. The effectiveness of HPV immunization is much higher when administered at a younger age, before any sexual activity takes place. It is offered in three doses administered within a 6 month period.

  • Meningococcal vaccine is also recommended for middle school students. It protects against meningitis which is an infection of the brain and spinal cord.


College students are required to show they have immunity to hepatitis B, MMR, and varicella (chickenpox). If immunization records from previous years are not available, a simple blood test can be ordered by the physician to check the levels for each of these vaccines. Also, students have to be up to date with the Tdap vaccine (it is good for 10 years), and they should receive a meningococcal booster.

In addition to the above mentioned immunizations, every child and adult should be given the flu vaccine annually. This vaccine protects against influenza virus which is very contagious. It is spread by cough and sneezing. Most common symptoms are: high fever, tachycardia (elevated heart rate), cough, and muscle aches, which usually go away on its own within few days. However, sometimes flu can turn into very severe illnesses, especially among patients with compromised immunity, or other health problems.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
 

Difficulty with Sleep? By Your Marque Team

The Importance of Sleep

Sleep is very important for the functioning of our bodies as it helps restore the immune, nervous, skeletal and muscle systems. Without restful sleep, these bodily functions will not work optimally. Sleep deprivation can cause a multitude of health issues. It is well known and studied that there are associations with increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, immune disorders and cognitive impairment in people that do not sleep well. Studies have shown that sleeping better promotes longevity.

Sleep Help, Sleep Hygiene and Stimulants

There are many things you can do to improve your sleep. One of the best things you can do is to avoid stimulants. Stimulants affecting sleep can be broken down into many categories. There are drinks that can be stimulating such as those containing caffeine and alcohol. There are foods that can be stimulating including chocolate, certain fruits and foods containing MSG (monosodium glutamate). Even foods rich in aged cheese contain a substance called tyramine that affects sleep. There are drugs and medications that can be stimulating. These can include certain prescription medications such as steroids, mood and anxiety medications (SSRI and similar medications), and ADHD medications (containing amphetamine like substance). Certain supplements such as Ginseng can be stimulating. Even chemicals in toothpaste such as Triclosan may affect sleep. There are also other environmental stimulants that one should be careful of such as bright artificial light. This is now very common with use of smartphones.

Sleep Tips

  • Avoid food and drink stimulants as listed above, especially several hours before bed or even entirely.

  • Avoid TV and smart phone use while in bed preparing for sleep.

  • Make sure your bedroom is dark and noise free when trying to sleep.

  • Avoid exercise before going to sleep.

  • Discuss use of stimulating medications with your doctor if having difficulty with sleep.


 

Supplements and Medication

There are options to help with poor sleep if the things above do not help. Most over-the-counter sleep aids use anti-histamines as they have a side effect of drowsiness. These can unfortunately cause daytime grogginess or drowsiness and can have other unwanted side effects. Prescription medications are an option but most are considered controlled substances and can be discussed with your doctor. Melatonin and herbal sleep aids are an option also and are available without prescription.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Steps to a Better Night’s Sleep by Your Marque Team

When Daylight Saving time ends or begins, this means we’ll change our clocks by one hour. Although the term "spring forward and fall back" indicates which way we turn the clock, this simple action each spring and fall doesn't necessarily result in our body clock changing immediately.

Internal Body Clock

Our primary body clock, located in the brain, keeps track of a handful of behavioral functions in sync with each other– such as temperature, digestive function and hormone production. It also determines when we are alert and sleepy.  This process is called a circadian rhythm which it keeps its own time. When the transition onto or off daylight savings time occurs, our circadian rhythm is out of sync by an hour. This is similar to having mild jet lag.

"Falling back " is usually no problem because we tend to feel sleepy a little earlier than usual and wake up earlier as well. To help with sleep here are 8 tips to make sure to are well rested:

  1. Have an omega-rich breakfast. Omega 3s are healthy fats which lower anxiety while producing hormones that help you fall asleep. Chia seeds or walnuts are high in these omegas. Try adding these to your morning meal.

  2. Limit caffeine intake. While coffee is good for you, limit your intake after 2pm so it won’t interfere with your sleep.

  3. Set a kitchen curfew. Limit heavy meals and alcohol before bed. Eating late can affect falling to sleep. Set a kitchen curfew for 7pm so that you can get to sleep at a decent hour.

  4. Keep your bedroom cool. Insomniacs have a warmer core temperature. Keeping your bedroom between 65-67 degrees will help you fall to sleep easier.

  5. Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day. Studies show if you go to bed and wake up at the same time, it will cause you to have better quality of sleep and your circadian rhythm will be in sync to the point where you may not need an alarm.

  6. Try a melatonin supplement. If you are having trouble sleeping, a low dose of melatonin can be way to help fall asleep faster.

  7. Use lavender essential oil. Lavender essential oil promotes calming. Putting some in a diffuser in your bedroom or applying some to the soles of your feet will help with falling asleep.

  8. Take a relaxing bath or shower. Taking a hot bath or shower 90 minutes before bed can help you relax and improve your quality of sleep.


 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Summer Camp by Colleen Kraft, M.D.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has created this checklist to help you navigate the camp experience. Use this list to make your child’s summer camp memories safe, healthy, and fun!

Camp Choices—The Basics:

Choosing a summer camp for your child can seem like an overwhelming experience of choices and costs. Consider these points when scouting camps:

  • Start looking for camps early. Some camps start booking as early as January―and fill up quickly!

  • Consider your child’s personality and interests. Camps comes in all shapes and sizes. The arts, sports, nature, some combination? There are many possibilities.

  • Day camp vs overnight camp. Think about your child’s comfort with being away from home and talk together about what seems like a good fit. While there is no hard and fast rule about what age is best for overnight camp, most children are ready between ages 7 and 8 years old.


After you’ve decided on the basics, the next step is to get more detailed information:

  • Get referrals. Ask other parents who sent their children to the camp about their experiences. Remember, though, that there’s no better way to find a perfect fit than checking camps out in person with your child.

  • Ask about the staff. Do the same counselors return each year or is there high turnover? Is the staff made up of young adults or teens, as well as adults? What are their roles? What is the child to staff ratio? If applicable, it is also important to ask about whether the staff has any prior experience working with children with special needs and/or whether they are willing to accommodate your child.

  • Ask how healthcare is delivered at camp. Many camps have camp nurses, but no physicians. Some camps don't even have camp nurses due to their size, and only first-aid trained staff members. Ask how the camp deals with minor illnesses and injuries? How are staff trained to handle these situations? Does the camp have arrangements with local hospitals and emergency medical services? Know who is caring for your children, and what training those staff members have. 

  • Is the camp accredited by the American Camp Association (ACA)? Accreditation is different than licensing. This does not guarantee a risk-free environment, but it's some of the best evidence you have of a camp's commitment to a safe and nurturing environment for children.

  • What are the swimming requirements? Camps with a water component will likely require your child to take a swim test. If your child does not pass the test, this can lead your child feeling left out and/or forced to be in a lower age group.

  • Ask about sunblock. Most camps have kids outside all day. Camps should have a protocol for how often they have children reapply sunscreen.

  • What does the camp require prior to attendance? Make sure all campers are required to be vaccinated according to the recommended childhood immunization schedule. Many camps also require a sports physical, because campers are athletes too!


Camp Prep: What to Do Before You Go

Now that you’ve booked your child’s camp experience, the next step is preparation:

  • Swim lessons. By age 5 or 6, most children in swim lessons can master the front crawl. If your child hasn't already started in a learn-to-swim program, now is the time! Water survival competency skills are very important for campers. Consider some refresher lessons to prepare your child for the camp swim test.

  • Make your doctor’s appointments. The AAP recommends asking to have a sports physical when scheduling your child's next routine well-child visit. Make sure your child has a camp, sports or annual physical before heading to camp. Many camps require this before entry.

  • Talk to the camp directors about any special health care needs. If your child has a condition such as asthma, food allergies or other special needs, have special emergency action plans. Keep the camp informed in the same way you keep your child’s school informed. For example, does the camp allow peanut or tree nut food products?  Does your child know how to use personal emergency medications such as inhalers or epinephrine auto-injectors independently?

  • Know the rules about electronics at camp. If your child is “off-grid” or electronics are not allowed, plan for how best to keep in touch. If tablets, for example, are allowed but must be kept in backpacks or cabins, make sure your child understands and follows those rules. Ask the camp how best to communicate with your child in an emergency.

  • Do not make any medication changes before camp. Parents are often tempted to take “drug holidays” during or before camp. Camp is not a good place to find out that medication changes are not going well.

  • Talk openly about homesickness. Stay positive about the camp experience but help your child understand that it may take getting used to. Know homesickness can happen at any time―regardless of how many times your child has been to camp before.


The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

Cellulitis by Kristen Wheeler

What is cellulitis?

Cellulitis is a type of bacterial skin infection that affects the deep layers of our skin.   MRSA, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus are two common bacteria that can cause cellulitis.  Bacteria enters a tear in our skin resulting in infection.  Cellulitis can appear on any part of the body, but is usually found on arms, lower legs, and the face.

Symptoms

An example of symptoms can be redness of the area, warm to the touch, pain, skin dimpling, tenderness, swelling, fever, fatigue, and swollen lymph nodes.  The affected area can spread to other areas.   Complications of cellulitis can include infection in the bloodstream or to other tissue.

Who’s at risk to get cellulitis?

Individuals with compromised immune systems with conditions like diabetes or HIV.  Any cut, fracture, burn or a scrape.  Bug bites, animal bites, open wounds, blisters, surgical incisions, athletes’ foot, dermatitis, eczema, lymphedema and more.  Even being overweight or obese increases your risk of cellulitis.

Prognosis

To get the appropriate prognosis, you must be evaluated by a physician.  Sometimes a skin, blood, puss, or tissue culture is done.

Treatment

Oral and intravenous antibiotics are used to treat cellulitis, but do not always kill the bacteria.  To name a few oral antibiotics like clindamycin, doxycycline, and cephalexin can be used to treat cellulitis.  Sometimes IV antibiotics are required.  If there is an abscess, sometimes the provider must cut it open and drain it.

Prevention

Wash your wound gently and daily with soap and water.  Apply protective ointment and cover the area with a bandage daily.  Keep it clean and dry.  Watch for signs of infection.  Trim your fingernails and toenails carefully, so the surrounding skin is not injured.  Moisturize your skin to prevent cracking and peeling.

Complication of cellulitis can be dangerous.  It can cause tissue damage or tissue death.  Cellulitis can also spread to the blood, bones, lymph system, heart, or nervous system.  Left untreated, these infections can turn into amputation, shock, or even death.

https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/qa/what-is-cellulitis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellulitis

https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/skin-disorders/bacterial-skin-infections/cellulitis

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cellulitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20370762

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caffeine: Pros and Cons by Marianne Leffert

What is caffeine and where does it come from? Caffeine is a natural stimulating chemical found in familiar products like soda, tea, energy drinks, and coffee. Caffeine is naturally found in about 60 plant types such as cocoa beans, kola nuts, and tea leaves. It works when entering our central nervous system, usually taken orally in a drink or pill form.  As early as 10 minutes after ingesting caffeine you will start feeling the side effects. At about 45 minutes after ingesting caffeine we will get about 99% of the full effects lasting anywhere from 4-8 hours.

Because caffeine is a stimulant some possible side effects include: elevated heart rate, insomnia, nervousness, restlessness or jittery feeling, irritable bowels, nausea or vomiting, increased respirations, and elevated blood pressure. If caffeine is taken in larger doses (i.e. 6 or more cups of coffee per day) can cause anxiety, chest pain and headaches, even cause irregular heartbeats.

With all these side effects, why are there so many products produced containing caffeine? When taken in moderation, (i.e. 2-3 cups of coffee a day) there are many temporary benefits of caffeine that have been found. Such as being more alert and having a better ability to concentrate.  This is especially true with those who have chronic fatigue or sleep deprivation. It can also alleviate headaches or tension migraines.  When consumed in moderation, it has also been proven to reduce the risk of diabetes and lowering our hemoglobin A1c. Coffee consumption may aid in those who have constipation, although this has been mixed results. Caffeine has even proven to reduce the risk in certain cancers such as throat or liver cancer and even prostate cancer. It has even been known to help in aiding those who are asthmatic with airway function for up to 4 hours.

Many athletes will promote energy drinks because it is proven to enhance athletic performance on such a wide spectrum. It has proven to increase strength and power output, high intensity cardio and aerobic exercise. It can increase our bodies responsiveness to testosterone and adrenaline.

Here are some recommended caffeine dosages from WebMd:

  • For headache or improving mental alertness: 250 mg per day.

  • For tiredness: 150-600 mg.

  • For improving athletic performance: 2-10 mg/kg or more has been used. However, doses in excess of 800 mg per day can result in urine levels greater than the 15 mcg/mL allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

  • For weight loss: the ephedrine/caffeine combination products are commonly dosed 20 mg/200 mg three times per day.

  • For headache after epidural anesthesia: 300 mg.One cup of brewed coffee provides from 95-200 mg of caffeine. An 8-ounce serving of black tea provides from 40-120 mg of caffeine. An 8-ounce serving of green tea provides 15-60 mg of caffeine. Soft drinks such as cola provide from 20-80 mg of caffeine per 12 ounce serving. Sports or energy drinks typically provide from 48-300 mg of caffeine per serving.


Is caffeine addictive? Since caffeine is a stimulant, daily use can cause a physical dependency. Let us say you have a few cups of coffee every morning, as many people do to jumpstart their day. If you were to abruptly stop having your coffee or any caffeine intake, you may experience some symptoms of withdrawal for a couple of days until your body adjusts back from the physical dependency. Some common side effects are headache, extra fatigue, irritability, and difficulty concentrating. Caffeine dependency is not considered a serious addiction or harmful like street drugs or alcohol.

Sources:

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-979/caffeine

https://www.webmd.com/diet/caffeine-directory

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/271707.php

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

Dehydration by Your Marque Team

Dehydration is a condition that occurs when the loss of body fluids, mostly water, exceed the amount that is taken in. We lose water every day in the form of water vapor in the breath we exhale and in our excreted sweat, urine, and stool. Along with the water, small amounts of salts are also lost. When we lose too much water, our bodies may become out of balance or dehydrated. Severe dehydration can lead to death.

Many conditions may cause rapid and continued fluid losses and lead to dehydration:

  • Fever, heat exposure, and too much exercise

  • Vomiting, diarrhea, and increased urination due to infection

  • Diseases such as diabetes

  • The inability to seek appropriate water and food (as in the case of a disabled person)

  • An impaired ability to drink (for instance, someone in a coma or on a respirator)

  • No access to safe drinking water

  • Significant injuries to skin, such as burns or mouth sores, or severe skin diseases or infections (water is lost through the damaged skin)


The signs and symptoms of dehydration range from minor to severe and include:

  • Increased thirst

  • Dry mouth and swollen tongue

  • Weakness

  • Dizziness

  • Palpitations (feeling that the heart is jumping or pounding)

  • Confusion

  • Sluggishness fainting

  • Fainting

  • Inability to sweat

  • Decreased urine output


Try to get people who are dehydrated to take in fluids in the following ways:

  • Sipping small amounts of water

  • Drinking carbohydrate/electrolyte-containing drinks. Good choices are sports drinks such as Gatorade

  • Sucking on popsicles made from juices and sports drinks

  • Sucking on ice chips


The foremost treatment for dehydration is prevention. Anticipate the need for increased fluid intake.

  • Plan ahead and take extra water to all outdoor events and work where increased sweating, activity, and heat stress will increase fluid losses. Encourage athletes and outdoor workers to replace fluids at a rate that equals the loss.

  • Avoid exercise and exposure during high heat index days. Listen to weather forecasts for high heat stress days, and plan events that must occur outside during times when temperatures are cooler.

  • Avoid alcohol consumption, especially when it is very warm, because alcohol increases water loss and impairs your ability to sense early signs associated with dehydration.

  • Wear light-colored and loose-fitting clothing if you must be outdoors when it is hot outside. Carry a personal fan or mister to cool yourself.


The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

Common Summer Health Issues to Avoid by Your Marque Team

Health issues can get in the way of your summer fun and you don’t want that happening. Some common ailments are bed bugs, heat rash, food poisoning and swimmer’s ear. Here’s how to spot, treat and prevent these common problems, and what to do if they strike.

BED BUGS

The kids are out of school, so you take a vacation and stay at a hotel. So does EVERYONE else. The peak season for bed bugs is June through October. The increase in heat and humidity during the summer and early fall months has the effect of making bed bugs more active. Make sure you check the beds in the hotel rooms as well as your own beds at home just to be safe.

How to spot signs of bed bugs:

  • Look for rusty or reddish stains on bed sheets or mattresses caused by bed bugs being crushed.

  • Dark spots (about this size: •), which are bed bug excrement and may bleed on the fabric like a markbed_buger would.

  • Eggs and eggshells, which are tiny (about 1mm) and pale yellow skins that nymphs shed as they grow larger.

  • Live bed bugs.


 

Where bed bugs hide:

When not feeding, bed bugs hide in a variety of places. Around the bed, they can be found near the piping, seams and tags of the mattress and box spring, and in cracks on the bed frame and headboard.

Preventing bed bugs:

At home, try not storing your luggage under your bed. Ideally, luggage should be stored in a basement or garage. Other tips include decluttering your home, vacuuming more often and keeping belongings separate when taken to school or work.

HEAT RASH


With our high temperatures in Southern California, heat rash can be a very common, yet real concern. If you sweat enough, your sweat glands can actually get blocked, and the excess moisture can cause skin irritation, itching, and redness. The best way to prevent this from happening is by staying cool. Drink plenty of cool water, wear light clothing that breathes, and try to avoid staying in the sun for too long.  If you do see signs of heat rash, cool your body (in an air conditioned place or with a fan) or take a cool shower and let your body air dry.  Do not use any oil based lotions because you don’t want to block your sweat glands.  Heat rash should self-resolve within a few days.

FOOD POISONING


When food is left in the heat for an extended periods of time, bacteria grows. Food poisoning is more common during the summer because the microorganisms that cause it grow most quickly when the temperature is between 90 and 100 degrees. Nearly 300,000 people are hospitalized annually due to food poisoning.  Make sure your food stays in a cool place while on the beach or picnicking.  Use extra care to foods that contain mayonnaise, dairy, eggs or meat products.  Keep them cool because they can start to develop bacteria within several hours of being unrefrigerated.

Food poisoning symptoms:

Symptoms of food poisoning include upset stomach, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and dehydration. Symptoms may range from mild to severe.

SWIMMER'S EAR

Ear infections can be really painful and can keep you out of the pool and ocean. No one wants that during the summertime! It’s often caused by water remaining in the ear after you go swimming. This can create a moist environment inside the ear, which helps bacteria to grow. The best way to avoid swimmer’s ear is to avoid immersing your head entirely in the water, or if you do, do not go too deep. You can also try wearing earplugs. Do NOT use Q-tips or cotton swabs to clean your ears, this will make it worse. In most cases, a doctor will prescribe ear drops and be advised to keep the ear dry.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.