MRSA by Kristen Torres

MRSA is the super bug that you hope you never get. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA, is an infection that is caused by a staph bacterium that becomes resistant to the majority of antibiotics that typically treat staph infections. MRSA is usually found in the health-care environment. Most of the patients that contract MRSA in the healthcare setting is due to invasive procedures or foreign body devices. MRSA can also be contracted outside the healthcare environment. People at risk are typically childcare workers, high school wrestlers, and people living in extremely congested areas, due to the spreading of skin to skin contact. MRSA, just like any other staph infection, begin as swollen, painful red bumps.

mrsa

The affected area typically resembles pimples and they usually present themselves as:

  • warm to the touch

  • full of pus or other drainage

  • typically accompanied by a fever


However, these simple pimples can quickly turn into deep, painful abscesses that would require surgical draining. In rare cases, the bacteria can surpass the skin barrier and go deep into the body, causing infection to the bones, joints, surgical wounds, the blood stream, heart valves and the lungs. MRSA can be treated through medication, even though it is resistant to majority of antibiotics.

Prevention of MRSA is essential, especially in the healthcare environment because it is so easily spread.

Forms of prevention include:comic

  • washing your hands

  • cleansing the rooms and equipment

  • keeping MRSA patients isolated from non-MRSA patients

  • always using personal protective equipment (PPE)


 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

Tips to Alleviate Gastrointestinal (GI) Stress by Your Marque Team

Are you having digestive issues?  Here are some user-friendly tips to help alleviate GI stress:

Fiber helps with constipation.  Cherries, grapes, bell peppers, beans, whole grains and nuts are rich in fiber.  They all help keep your digestion regular.  Your body needs around 20-35 grams of fiber daily.  It also helps keep away weight gain, heart disease, blood sugar (high or low) and hemorrhoids.

Chew gum to help fight heartburn.  It may relieve reflux by stimulating the production of acid neutralizing saliva.   Just make sure to chew every other flavor besides peppermint.

Lose weight to cut gas and heartburn.  Loose just 2 pounds and you could improve gastrointestinal symptoms.  Extra pounds especially around the midsection can worsen digestive issues like heartburn, gas and belching.

Stop bloating and heartburn with smaller meals.  It’s a good way to stop indigestion.  The key is to eat smaller and more frequent meals and eat slower.  It avoids overloading your digestive system and helps shrink stomach capacity.

Drink to stop constipation.  Drinking fluids helps your body get rid of waste to help with constipation.  Eight glasses a day is not enough, drink as much as possible throughout your day.

Get moving to beat bloating.  It may help with most minor digestive problems from bloating to constipation.  Physical activity helps your body’s digestive system.  It moves things and eliminates waste.  It also helps reduce stress a prime irritant of any digestive problems.

Stop smoking to beat heartburn.  When you smoke you wreak havoc on digestion in many ways.  Smoking weakens the valve at the end of the esophagus, which can lead to acid reflux and heart burn.  It also increases the risk for various gastrointestinal cancers.

Drink less alcohol to ease stomach issues.  Alcohol interferes with acid secretion, stomach muscles, and nutrient absorption.  Too many drinks can contribute to heartburn, diarrhea, liver problems and even esophageal cancers.

Maybe dairy is the problem.  Some people find that their bodies can’t digest lactose, the natural sugar in milk.  As a result gas buildup is in your stomach.  Eliminating anything dairy related can help relieve gas issues.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Children and Fractures by Colleen Kraft, M.D.



Although the term fracture may sound serious, it is just another name for a broken bone. Fractures are a very common injury among children under age six. Falls cause most of the fractures in this age group.

A broken bone in a child is different from one in an adult, because young bones are more flexible and have a thicker covering, which makes them better able to absorb shock. Children’s fractures rarely require surgical repair. They usually just need to be kept free of movement, most often through the use of a molded cast.

Most broken bones in children are either “greenstick” fractures, in which the bone bends like green wood and breaks only on one side, or “torus” fractures, in which the bone is buckled and twisted but not completely broken. A “bend” fracture refers to a bone that is bent but not broken. “Complete” fractures, in which the bone breaks all the way through, also occur in young children.

There are three types of fractures that may require surgery. A “displaced” fracture, where the ends are separated or out of alignment, an elbow fracture, or a fracture through the child’s growth plate (an area at the end of the bone that regulates further growth) may require surgery and longer term follow up by an orthopedic surgeon.

Fractures also are classified as “non-displaced,” when the broken ends are still in proper position, or “displaced,” when the ends are separated or out of alignment. In an “open” or “compound” fracture, the bone sticks through the skin. If the skin is intact, the fracture is “closed.”

Signs and Symptoms:

It’s not always easy to tell when a bone is broken, especially if your child is too young to describe what he’s feeling. Ordinarily with a fracture, you will see swelling and your child will clearly be in pain and unable—or unwilling—to move the injured limb. However, just because your child can move the bone doesn’t necessarily rule out a fracture.

Home Treatment—Until your child can be examined:

  1. You can use an ice pack with a child older than two; cold can cause skin injury to the delicate skin of younger children.

  2. Do not give the child anything by mouth to drink or relieve pain without first consulting your doctor.

  3. If part of the injury is open and bleeding, or if bone is protruding through the skin, place firm pressure on the wound; then cover it with clean (preferably sterile) gauze. Do not try to put the bone back underneath the skin. Call 911 and let paramedics supervise transportation and help make your child comfortable.

  4. Until your child can be seen in the pediatrician’s office, emergency room, or urgent care center, use an improvised sling or rolled-up newspaper or magazine as a splint to protect the injury from unnecessary movement.


 

Professional Treatment:

After examining the break, the doctor will order X rays to determine the extent of the damage. If the doctor suspects that the bone’s growth plate is affected, or if the bones are out of line, an orthopedic consultation will be necessary.

Because children’s bones heal rapidly and well, a plaster or fiberglass cast, or sometimes just an immobilizing splint, is all that is needed for most minor fractures. For a displaced fracture, an orthopedic surgeon may have to realign the bones. This may be done as a “closed reduction,” in which the surgeon uses local or general anesthesia, manipulates the bones until they’re straight, and then applies a cast. An “open reduction” is a surgical procedure done in an operating room, but this is rarely necessary for children.

Usually casting brings a decrease in pain. If your child has an increase in pain, numbness, or pale or blue fingers or toes, call your doctor immediately. These are signs of swelling. To relieve the pressure, the doctor may split the cast, open a window in it, or replace it with a larger one. You should also let your doctor know if the cast breaks or become wet and soggy, as the cast needs to be intact to help the bone heal.

Bones that have been broken will sometimes form a hard knot at the site of the break during the healing process. As the bone remodels, it will resume its normal shape within in a few months.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.