Q. and A. with Dr. Kiskila- This Month’s Topic: Back to School and Sports Physicals

Question: Dr. Kiskila what are back to school and sports physicals?

Answer: Back to school sport physicals are a physical medical exam with a doctor to evaluate that the student is healthy enough to participate in school-related physical activities. They are often referred to as back to school exams, because they are typically done at the beginning of the school year and are valid for the entire school year, but they can be done anytime.  Ideally, sports physicals should be done 6 weeks before preseason practice begins.

Question: Who needs them?

Answer: Any student who participates in sports should have a physical once a year.

Question: What do you check and assess during these physicals?

Answer: Doctors check the student’s vital signs like blood pressure and heart rate to make sure they are healthy enough to participate in sports. We assess the heart and lungs for any murmurs or wheezing for asthma. Doctors also assess the student’s muscular and skeletal range of motion, and perform a neurological exam to check reflexes, pupil dilation, and vision. We palpate the abdomen to assess abdominal organs such as the spleen. Additionally, we look at the patient's ears, nose and throat. For males, we may need to check for a hernia by pressing on the groin area. We also review the student athlete’s personal and family medical history and answer any questions. We want the students to be healthy, active and successful as they participate in their sports.

Question: Are there particular questions that parents should ask the physician during the exam?

Answer: Back to school and sports physicals are a terrific opportunity to not only ask activity-related questions, but to also inquire about the child's overall health.

Question: What occurs after the exam?

Answer: If the doctor determines that that child is healthy and safe to participate, he will fill out a clearance form for the family to give to the school.  If the child needs further testing before they can be cleared to play, next steps will be scheduled for the second evaluation.  The objective is to get the young athlete healthy and fit to participate as soon as possible.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
 

 

Healthy Eating by Jessica Medina



Did you know that 60% of American men and women are considered obese? This is a result of a lack of exercise and poor eating habits. Although exercise is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle, healthy eating is critical since your diet can greatly impact your life in a positive or negative way.

Healthy eating starts at home with the meals that we prep. Many people don’t care about what they’re putting in their mouth until they have a health issue like a condition such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or even cases as extreme as coronary artery disease. Most of these problems can be avoided by a healthier diet.

How can you eat healthier and what is considered healthy eating?  Natural, whole foods with minimal processing and added sugar are examples of healthy food choices. A diet filled with colorful fruits and vegetables has a plethora of health benefits- from lowering blood pressure, to helping your eyesight, or helping to fight different types of cancer.

Healthy eating also means knowing the difference between good fats and bad fats. You don’t want to load your body with bad, saturated fats. These types of fats are very common in foods that we love to eat such as fried foods and baked goods. Olive oil is an example of a good fat and one that is beneficial to your body.

Vegetables are proven to help provide your body with essential nutrients necessary for optimal functioning. People who have a diet high in vegetables are less likely to develop diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, or heart disease. Veggies are also high in fiber, which is great to maintain regular bowel movements and relieve constipation. Fruits, beans, nuts, quinoa, and sweet potatoes are also healthy, delicious, high fiber food choices.

If you start making healthy food choices, you are taking steps to save not only your health, but also your bank account.  A healthy diet can cut on the cost of medical bills and insurance, and you’ll reduce your visits to the doctors.  Consume foods that are high in good fats, high in fiber, and high in health benefits.  Drink more water throughout the day because often we confuse thirst for hunger.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

The Mind – Body Connection of Strength Training by Erin Bell

What is strength training? Strength training is a form of exercise that uses resistance to make bones and muscles stronger.  We all want strong bones, right?  What does it take to get them? Some say building strong bones requires only two ingredients: calcium and vitamin D, but there are some other key elements as well. By stressing your bones, strength training can increase bone density and reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Lifting heavy weights or even using your own body’s weight as resistance during physical activity has been shown to halt and even reverse sarcopenia – the reduction of skeletal muscle that occurs as we get older.

Strength training is a form of exercise which can lift your mood and enhance your well-being. Physical activity mobilizes hormones and helps the body to recalibrate emotions especially when they are unsteady or exacerbated. Building muscle and strengthening bones creates improved body composition, and in time, improves posture. When a person stands with shoulders back, head and neck straight and upwards, shoulder blades pinched down into back- they are sending a message to their brain that they are on top of things and can handle anything. Moving your body sharpens thinking skills and creates an alert mind that is resilient.

Raising heart rate through strength training once or twice a day is a healthy habit to introduce to an individual's daily routine. Strength training causes increased flow-mediated dilation which contributes to cardiovascular health. The reason why it is important to have a healthy heart is because a person can live a fulfilling and active life when they do not have heart conditions. The heart works very hard every day, non-stop, for our entire lives, so it is a nice thing to do to take care of it.

What are some ways a person can strength train? In the morning it is easy to do some exercises at home such as push-ups, squats and sit-ups. All of these exercises use the body's natural weight to make bones stronger through exercise. It is good to keep the body's muscles engaged for at least a minute at a time, then switch to a new exercise such as flutter kicks or scissor kicks. Strength training can help a person gain lean body mass, gain a clear mind and maybe even some confidence because they will feel strong enough to complete daily tasks on their own. When a person decides to improve their body through routines that makes the body stronger, the person also improves their mind.

In conclusion, strength training is healthy for the muscles and bones of the body and it is healthy for the person a whole. Strength training can be done at home or even in the office, there is always some time to get a few small movements in to improve your circulation. The blood flow to your brain is healthy for you mind and thoughts and may contribute to productivity.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Which Types of Injuries Require Physical Therapy?

 

The Scope of Physical Therapy


Physical therapy covers just about everything when it comes to recovery. Although, it may seem to be associated exclusively to sports and orthopedic injuries, there is a larger scope that this type of therapy reaches. For example, physical therapy can help patients dealing with brain disorders and diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. In another dimension, physical therapy can also aid in rehabilitating those who are struggling with a deadly cardiovascular condition. From a simple problem such as a sprained ankle to the complex issues stated above, physical therapy can be the answer to any rehabilitation process within the body.

Below are the types of injuries that require physical therapy:

 

Sport Injuries


Most people have heard of an athlete who tore their ACL, broke a bone, pulled a hamstring, sprained an ankle, etc. These prevalent injuries are sure to require some form of physical therapy for a full recovery. According to the NCAA, “The overall injury rate in NCAA football is 8.1 injuries per 1,000 athlete exposures (games and practices combined).” This is in just football alone!

Although sports injuries often occur during the game or in practice, many injuries can occur in the everyday jog, sprint, or workout. Fox New reported the “Top 10 Sports Injuries” prevalent in the world. Here are the top five:

 

  1. Runner’s Knee: Experts say that this injury occurs when an individual runs for long periods of time, improperly. The impact between “tight” joints, muscles and ligaments in the leg to a hard surface can especially harm the knees and ankles overtime. Johns Hopkins Medicine illustrated the symptoms of this injury as “pain in and around the kneecap that happens when you are active...” and “rubbing, grinding, or clicking sound of the kneecap that you hear when you bend and straighten your knee…”

  2. “Shoulder Injury”: Performing regular intense motions during a particular sport can increase the risk of a shoulder injury. These motions could include throwing a football or baseball, for example. Dr. David Geier, sports medicine specialist, posted that “shoulder injuries represented 27.8% of all disabled days in professional baseball players. Pitchers experienced a 34% higher incidence injury rate compared with fielders in Major League Baseball.” Symptoms of a shoulder injury can include “stiffness” and pain when putting it in motion to perform a normal task.

  3. Sprained Ankle: It doesn’t take much to sprain an ankle. This can occur in professional sports, but it can also happen within the everyday activities. For example, walking down the stairs in an awkward way, or tripping over something can cause a sprained ankle. Sometimes a sprain is minor enough that it will heal over a period of a week or so, while more serious instances of a sprain require ice and therapy to strengthen it once again. Symptoms of a sprain can range from “tenderness” to severe bruising and “restricted range of motion.”

  4. “Tennis or Golf Elbow”: Statistics imply that “1% to 3% of the population” are affected in some way by this injury. Surprisingly, tennis and golf are not exclusive in causing this injury. The Cleveland Clinic reported that working in the garden or outside, and “vacuuming” and “sweeping” inside the house can cause tennis elbow. Symptoms include a development of pain when moving other parts of the arm when carrying out regular exercises and tasks.

  5. Pulled Muscle: This injury is highly common in sports, but like a sprained ankle and other injuries, it can occur in the everyday tasks. When muscles are stiff and tight during movement, especially intense movement, it is easier for them to tear. Symptoms of this injury include pain, “soreness”, cramping, and “limited range of movement.”


 

Cognitive Injuries


transparent sculpture of the human skull

STATISTICS SHOW THAT "1.5 MILLION AMERICANS SUFFER FROM TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES."


Whether it is because of a sport or a malfunction within the body, physical therapy can be the path to recovery and a bright future. Injury in the brain is a perfect example of another dimension of reach in this form of therapy.

How can physical therapy help injuries in the brain?


Movement in the body is highly influenced by signals from the brain. A parent teaching a child to eat with a fork and a spoon is a perfect example of helping to train the brain in a certain function. When a patient is hit with a stroke or a disease that negatively influences brain behavior, physical therapists help retrain the brain through physical movement.

What brain injuries require physical therapy?


Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, strokes, and concussions can all be aided by physical therapy. Some of these injuries are also affected by other systems in the body such as the circulatory system. Physical therapists can also help facilitate movement in a way addresses the issues in both systems, while preventing future injury.

 

Immune Injuries


Physical therapy can reach an attacked immune system.


According to the AARDA (American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association), “Approximately 50 million Americans, 20 percent of the population or one in five people, suffer from autoimmune diseases.” As explained in the previous section, many times body systems play dual roles in affecting an individual’s health. Therefore, orthopedic and neurological injury can be an illustration of an autoimmune injury. For example, the autoimmune disease Lupus causes pain and tenderness in the joints. While an individual could assume that the weakness of their joints was caused by certain movements completed in an intense activity, it could be a symptom of another cause.

What would physical therapists do to help these injuries?


In the case of an autoimmune injury, physical therapists would create a diet plan and incorporate pool exercises that would give the least strain on the joints. Diet and exercise is crucial in recovering from most injuries, especially from immune injuries.

Training particular movements in water have also been applied to orthopedic and cardiovascular injuries. Experts have found a positive impact of “aqua therapy” on patients dealing with an autoimmune disease or other injury:

For many years, warm water pool therapy has been a staple of rehabilitation medicine because of its numerous health benefits...The use of...hydrotherapy historically has been a popular treatment for many conditions and has been used in many cultures and civilizations... today the modern forms of hydrotherapy include...aqua therapy for rehabilitative purposes. The latter application gained momentum from its predecessor, hydro-gymnastics, which became important for the treatment of post-polio patients.


Physical therapists can do a lot when it comes to helping patients with this type of injury. Although some autoimmune diseases cannot be merely solved, proper diet and training can help a patient cope with their situation in a way where they can live their lives more fully.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

How Working Out Can Cure Unwanted Stress

 

Everyone experiences stress.

Whether work related, family life, school, or something else, we are often told that stress is a normal part of life. And it is, to a certain extent, although too much stress is never a good thing.

Seven out of ten Americans adults report experiencing high levels of stress every day, and more people are reporting negative physical responses to stress than ever before.

Recently, the American Institute of Stress recently released a list of over 50 ways that stress can manifest itself, affecting different parts of the body and mind in various ways.

Sometimes stress acts as the motivation that you need to finish a task for work or school, and it can give you the extra push that you need to succeed. When experienced in the right amounts, stress can even improve memory and has other health implications.

 

BUT WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THAT CONSTANT LEVEL OF STRESS SUDDENLY GOES FROM MANAGEABLE TO MAKING YOU INCAPABLE OF FUNCTIONING? 

 

You begin to feel as if you’ll never feel relaxed ever again, and you may not even remember what it feels like to have a functional life with normal worries. So how can you relieve the unwanted pressure and better manage your stress?

Most people will give you a list of practices that include a compilation of the following suggestions: improve sleep and diet, meditate, participate in breathing exercises, listen to soothing music, try some natural remedies, and others. However, while each of these methods might help in stress relief, there is a more effective strategy that we offer.

 

Here's our one-word suggestion: Exercise.


It seems as if there is no end to the benefits that come from working out. On top of improving health and assisting with weight loss, regular exercise can increase energy, and improve memory, relaxation, and sleep!

Here’s how:

When you are stressed, the body increases the amount of stress hormones released. One of these hormones, called cortisol, is what triggers the brain and body to go into ‘survival mode.’

Survival Mode


There are a lot of changes that occur very quickly when the brain goes into this mode. First, the body adjusts blood sugar, metabolism, immune response and even more in order to best prepare you for  ‘fight or flight.’

Then, everything in the body begins to run faster, which can be damaging to your body unless you are in an actual life-threatening situation.

Cortisol


Here’s one of the major ways that working out can relieve stress. Cortisol is also released when you exercise and put physical stress on the body. Your body only produces a limited supply of cortisol at any given time, so the more cortisol is released when you’re working out, the less it can release when you’re under pressure at work, school, or home.

The more frequently you exercise, the more the body grows accustomed to managing hormone levels and dealing with stress.

Endorphins


Another major aspect of working out as stress management tactic has everything to do with endorphins. Endorphins are the body’s natural painkillers or ‘feel good’ hormones that are released when you work out, creating the sensation that is commonly referred to as a “runner’s high,” or feeling of elation that you experience after you finish a workout, run, or physical activity.

Working out also engages the mind, forcing you to concentrate deeply on the task at hand instead of getting distracted by worries or stressors.

Concentrating on your movement also allows you to feel more calm, gain increased clarity, and have an improved mood.

Proper form when exercising requires you to  focus on your breathing and time yourself with a sense of rhythm, which is another aspect of working out that will assist you to better manage your stress.

So whether it’s yoga, weight lifting, running or playing sports, engaging in frequent physical activity greatly improves your ability to handle stress.

 

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

How to Modify Your Workouts to Reduce the Chance of Injury

 

If you are at all familiar with working out, then you are also familiar with what comes after...days of being sore and tense, especially if you’re new to working out or don’t know exactly what you’re doing.

Fitness injuries can be some of the most frustrating experiences; they limit not only what you are able to accomplish in the gym but, if you’re not careful, can also leave a lasting effect on day-to-day activities.

According to WebMD, the most common workout injuries include the following:

  • Pulled muscle

  • Strained muscle

  • Sprained ankle

  • Shoulder injury

  • Knee injury

  • Shin splint

  • Tendinitis

  • Wrist sprain

  • Wrist dislocation


 

However, these and other injuries can be avoided if you learn the proper ways to workout. You want your workout to help you get stronger and be healthy, not hurt you and bring you down. But what can you do to better prepare your mind and body for the most effective workout, without having to risk getting injured in the process? We have just the trick.

Here are the best ways to modify your workouts to reduce your chance of getting injured:

 

Warm Up Before Working Out


Make sure the muscles are prepared for the exercises you’ll be doing. Spend some time warming up to improve circulation and prepare the muscles for the ranges of motion you’ll be performing during specific workouts. Warm muscles perform effectively, and will greatly reduce the chances of getting injured during a workout.

There are several different ways to warm up, including but not limited to: biking, running, jumping rope or using a row machine.

Also be sure to add some stretching and some post-workout cool-down exercises to further decrease the risk of injury.

 

Stay Hydrated


Not having enough water is one of the most dangerous choices to make when exercising. Staying hydrated allows the joints and muscles to work better.

Also, when you’re exercising, your body naturally heats up, and water works to help keep the body cool. Staying hydrated allows the body to stay away from overheating or over-exhaustion, which have major side effects.

 

Learn Proper Form


Be sure that you know the proper form of any exercise you plan to perform. Doing a work out incorrectly is one of the main reasons why so many people get injured while exercising.

Not only will using the correct form help you avoid injury and stay as healthy and active as possible, but it also increases the good properties of each exercise such as proper breathing habits, learning to reduce wasted energy, etc.

 

Limit Your Weight


Another absolutely crucial aspect of working out is staying within your limits. If you can only healthily lift 20 lbs when working out a certain muscle group, be okay with that. If you push too far too fast, it will cause an injury.

As you gradually work out and train, the body is able to reach higher weights in time. Just don’t get so impatient that you try to hit those higher weights now, because you will likely injure yourself.

Many prominent athletes and trainers have fallen victim to major injury because they attempted to lift a weight level that they weren’t ready for. Don’t let that happen to you, too!

 

Adjust Your Workout


If you do the same exercises day after day, you might be at risk of overusing certain muscles and putting unnecessary pressure on them. Overuse injuries are a thing, and you definitely don’t want one.

So instead of repeating the same workout every time you go to the gym, try something new! Try a new machine, work out a new muscle group, or learn a new approach to your normal workout. You’ll avoid overuse injuries and experience a new level of fitness!

 

Know When to Stop


Lastly, you need to be aware of your own limits and what your body can and cannot handle. Know when to stop yourself, even if you’re not completely done with a workout. You want to stay fit and healthy...pushing past the breaking point will not help you accomplish either of those things.

 

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

7 Ways Stretching Increases Physical and Mental Health

 

You’ve seen it your entire life. Whether headed to the doctor, or to the gym, the constant suggestion to stretch more...

  • stretch before your workout,

  • stretch after your workout,

  • stretch in the morning,

  • stretch before bed.


 

But what’s the point?

 

It turns out, stretching is way more useful than you may have thought, and the benefits are much more than just avoiding injury during a workout. Whether you are super athletic or always bent over a computer at work, stretching every day (or at least a few times a week) will benefit you greatly.

 

1) Reduced Stress & Calmed Mind


A stressed body causes the muscles to get tense and tight, which can cause soreness, throbbing headaches, and other painful symptoms. Stretching the right muscles can relieve this tension...reducing some stress, and calming the mind. A calm mind provides opportunities to be creative and optimistic.

 

2) Improved Blood Flow


When you stretch you gently tug and pull on muscles and ligaments throughout the body which increases the blood flow to these areas. An increased blood flow can help you think more clearly, recover from workouts more quickly, and remove unwanted toxins throughout the body.

 

3) Increased Energy


One of the greatest benefits of having increased blood flow is how refreshed it makes you feel. This refreshing feeling naturally increases energy levels, which help you to accomplish more each day.

"By lengthening the tight muscles we can realign our body to function as efficiently as possible, allowing us to go about our daily life feeling more energised."


-Renee Scott, former professional ballerina and founder of Barre Attack told HuffPost Australia.



4) Enhanced Alignment


A misaligned body can experience several physical and mental challenges.However, when aligned, the body can function most efficiently; people experience less aches and pains, the lungs are able to expand properly and supply the blood with necessary oxygen, and there isn’t any unnecessary strain or weight on joints.

Proper alignment also helps improve posture, which can have fiercely negative ramifications on the body and mind. Poor posture affects self-image, depression, soreness, and more. By stretching and aligning the body, posture can be improved and strengthened, making it easier to have better posture in the future.

 

5) Better Sleep


One of the most common stretching practices is to gently stretch before going to sleep. Stretching can be a very calming activity that helps relax both the mind and body and prepares the body for a calm sleeping experience.

 

6) Increased Flexibility


Flexibility is perhaps the most obvious benefit to stretching. Being more flexible improves the body’s range of motion, which makes the body less stiff and able to accomplish more while exercising or even turning your head to check a blind spot while driving.

 

7) Injury Prevention


Stretching loosens and relaxes muscles, preparing them to be used during exercise and athletics. With prepared, warmed up muscles, you can move smoothly and more efficiently, with lower risk of injury. Stretching does not, however, completely eliminate the risk of injury during exercise or athletic activity.

Falling asleep at work? Stand up and stretch out! Feeling sore? Stretching will help. About to go on a run? Don’t forget to stretch. Find times throughout your day to stretch and relax your muscles, reduce your stress, calm your mind, align your body, and improve your quality of life.

 

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 
hand resting on knee in meditation pose

7 Ways to Reduce Stress for Better Productivity

 

Life is hectic.

We live in a stress-filled world. Our workplaces are so competitive that if you aren’t constantly striving to be better, you’ll be passed up. But we still try to do our best to balance our time between our time-consuming job, our loved ones, furthering our education, and a thousand other activities we have going on.

We frequently feel like a juggler trying to maintain multiple balls in the air,  worrying about what might happen if we let them slip. We can easily become overwhelmed and we often feel frustrated, agitated, and have trouble relaxing. Or perhaps you constantly worry, lack focus, or regularly get sick.

These are all signs of stress. While stress is very normal in our society, as you can imagine, stress leads to lowered productivity. Here are seven ways you can reduce stress and live a healthier, more productive life.

 

1) Get More Sleep


There are so many benefits to getting a good night’s rest. According to the American Psychological Association, adults who get at least 8 hours of sleep per night experience less frustration, don’t feel as overwhelmed, and are less likely to skip exercise.

We all know that we should be getting 7-9 hours of sleep per night. However, how many of us actually do it?

Getting in a routine can make a huge difference. Establish what time you need to go to bed in order to get 8 hours of sleep and allow yourself some time to unwind before you lay down. Put down your electronic devices and read a book or meditate. Allow your mind enough time to relax before you go to sleep.

 

2) Exercise Regularly


This is one of the most important things on this list. When you exercise, you reduce the amount of stress hormones your body produces (cortisol). You will also improve the release of endorphins which can help improve your mood.

Exercise will also help with other aspects of stress reduction, including sleeping better and having a higher self-esteem.

Find exercise that you enjoy. Whether it is playing pickup basketball, running long distances, or weight training, it is important to be active.

 

3) Practice Yoga or Meditation


When you are stressed, your mind is usually racing with all the things you need to do or worrying about something in the future. Both yoga and meditation will help you focus on the moment and your breathing.

Yoga teaches you to join the mind and the body. While there are many different styles, studies have shown that yoga has been effective in reducing cortisol levels and in improving depression and anxiety.

While yoga focuses on joining the mind and body, meditation emphasizes training your mind to focus and redirect your thoughts. This can be extremely effective when your mind is filled, and you are stressed.

 

4) Laugh Often


You may have heard “laughter is the best medicine” and while that may be a stretch in some instances, it is certainly applicable to stress.

Laughter relaxes physical tension and relieves stress. It can leave your whole body relaxed up to 45 minutes afterwards. But it will also trigger the release of endorphins, raising your mood and creating an overall sense of well-being.

When you’re stressed, it can be difficult to laugh. But search out opportunities and don’t take yourself so seriously.

 

5) Write It Down


There are few things as therapeutic as journaling. Now you don’t have to keep a traditional journal; write down what is bothering you and what is going on in your life. This is your chance to vent and release some of that tension onto the paper.

Another way you can alleviate stress is to write down what you are grateful for. Keep a gratitude journal. This will help you stay focused on all the good things in your life and keep things in perspective.

 

6) Utilize Aromatherapy


The use of scents to improve or change your mood is called aromatherapy. While it may seem a little strange, several studies show that aromatherapy can decrease anxiety and improve sleep.

Some of the most relaxing scents include:

  •        Lavender

  •        Vetiver

  •        Cedarwood

  •        Frankincense

  •        Neroli

  •        Orange


Diffuse some essential oils or light a candle in the evening to help ease some of the tension and stress you have accumulated throughout the day.

 

7) Find Engaging Hobbies


You need to find activities where you can destress. Your job isn’t your life so don’t allow all of your responsibilities to define you. Find hobbies that you enjoy. Whether that is learning an instrument, developing a new skill, reading, or hiking, find time to fulfill your inner-self.

Remember, although your job is important, sometimes less is more. You will be far more productive in all aspects of your life when you learn to take a bit of time for yourself and separate your mind from the source of your stress. Find what works for you and note the difference in how you feel and your productivity.




 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.