Getting the Low-down on Triglycerides by Your Marque Team

marque teamYou try to live a fit and healthy lifestyle. You have come to understand the types of foods and activities that keep you feeling good.  You now read the nutritional facts on food packaging labels, choose organic instead of processed, steer clear of saturated fats, trans fats, and can differentiate between good and bad cholesterol levels.  You take care of yourself and stay up-to-date with your annual doctor’s check-up. However, during this last visit, your blood work came back with high triglyceride levels.  You think to yourself: What are triglycerides, and why are they high?

Triglycerides are fats that provide an important source of energy to your body, but at high levels, they can hurt your heart.  A lipid profile or lipid panel is a panel of blood tests that serves as an initial broad medical screening tool for abnormalities in lipids, such as cholesterol and triglycerides. A lipid panel will also obtain information for HDL (high-density lipoprotein), which is the good cholesterol and LDL (low-density lipoprotein), the bad cholesterol.

Typical triglyceride measurements are:

  • Normal - Less than 150 mg/dL

  • Borderline - 150-199 mg/dL

  • High - 200-499 mg/dL

  • Very High - 500mg/dL and up


donut png pulseLike high cholesterol, high triglyceride levels can lead to clogged arteries and possibly to a heart attack or stroke.  Fortunately, lowering levels of high triglycerides are manageable:

1. Take notice of what you are consuming

It’s difficult to balance a life that’s moving fast.  Career, family, and stress can lead you to unnecessary snacking and unhealthy meals, but if there is no time to prepare a salad, then what other options are there, aside from fast-food?  If you have high triglycerides, then it is absolutely vital you get your sweet tooth in check. Simple sugars, especially fructose (a sugar often found in fruit), increase triglyceride levels, along with foods made with added sugars, including soda, baked goodies, candy, ice cream, most breakfast cereals, and flavored yogurt.  It is best to avoid these food, or at the very least consume them in moderation.

2. Eat the right kinds of fat

Being aware of calories is great, but also taking note of the types of fat you are consuming is just as important.  Steer clear of trans fat, which is found in many processed foods, such as fries, chips, and margarine. The intake of saturated fats, like those found in red meats, cheeses, ice cream, and baked goods should be limited.  A little fat is good for you -- when it's the healthy kind. Choose foods that naturally contain monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat, like avocados, walnuts, and skinless chicken. Replace regular cooking oils with canola oil or extra virgin olive oil.

3. Eat more nuts, greens, and fish

Switch from a snack of chips and crackers to raw almonds and walnuts.  Nuts are packed with protein and Omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for your heart, and provide stamina throughout the day.  More importantly, Omega-3 may also help lower your triglycerides.  Try to eat fish at least twice a week.  Wild salmon, mackerel, albacore tuna, and sardines are all high in Omega-3s. Additionally, other good sources of fatty acids can be found in salad greens, such as spinach, kale, and brussels sprouts. Incorporating at least two servings of salad greens per day to your daily diet will power up your meals with vitamins and proteins.

4. Cut back on alcohol consumption and sugary drinks

Excessive consumption of alcohol and drinks high in sugar can lead to high triglycerides.  Sodas and other sweetened drinks are compounded with fructose syrup -- a turbo booster for high triglycerides.   An occasional glass of red wine or a beer is fine, but one of the best ways to lower your triglycerides is to cut out alcoholic and sweetened drinks all together.  There are other alternatives such adding club soda or sparkling water to natural fruit juices to liven up any drink and serve as a healthier alternative to sweetened drinks.  It is okay to indulge every once in a while,  just remember to sip slowly, enjoy the drink, and try not to overdo it.

5. Lose weight

Although challenging, losing weight is attainable and is certainly the most important factor in lowering triglyceride levels. Extra weight buildup, particularly around your waist, raises triglycerides.  The most effective way to lower triglycerides is to shed some of those extra inches by maintaining a regular workout regimen for 30 minutes a day and 5 days per week.  Losing a mere 7 - 15 pounds will dramatically lower your triglyceride levels.  Build up a sweat and keep your heart pumping with dance classes (like Zumba), swimming, or walking.

Lifestyle changes may be in order, when attempting to lower your triglycerides, which is why it is always a good idea to consult with your doctor.  Be detailed, and be honest regarding any symptoms you have been experiencing.  Explain if you have been exercising or eating right.  Doctors will provide feedback and recommendations to keep you healthy.  Your doctor may also prescribe medication or request an annual lipid panel to be done to monitor blood fats (triglycerides and all other types of cholesterol) in an effort to protect your heart.

Know what is good for you, but know what is better for you. Avoid that creamy latte, grilled cheese sandwich, or scoop of ice cream before bed.  Get moving and work out. Remember, if you often eat more calories than you burn - like many of us do - your triglycerides may start to build up.  Now that you understand the lowdown on triglycerides, hopefully the recommendations provided will help you maintain a happy and healthy way of life.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
 

Q. and A. with Dr. Kiskila- This Month’s Topic: Parasite Infections

Dr. kiskila webQuestion- Dr. Kiskila, what is a parasite?

Answer- A parasite is an organism that lives in a host and gets its food from or at the expense of its host. Parasites come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes and they cause a diverse range of health issues.  For instance, some parasites consume what you digest leaving you hungry and undernourished.  Others can cause anemia by feeding on your red blood cells.  Parasites can also lay eggs which cause itching and even sleeplessness. Tapeworms are parasites that can live in the human gastrointestinal tract.

Question- How do I get a parasite infection?

Answer- Humans typically get a parasite from undercooked meats like beef, chicken or raw freshwater fish. Fruits and vegetables that are not clean can harbor parasites. Some parasites can multiply in humans and can be passed from person to person through stool. People can also get parasites from poor sanitation areas or when people don’t wash their hands before handling food. Parasites can lurk in contaminated water in underdeveloped countries as well.

parasite pngQuestion- What are the symptoms of a parasite infection?

Answer- Parasite infections are sometimes asymptomatic. Diarrhea, weight loss, anal itching, and sometimes vitamin B12 deficiency could be symptoms of a parasite infection. Some other symptoms may include nausea, weight loss, or stomach pain. Visualizing worms in the stool is a sign of tapeworm infestation.

Question- What is the treatment for a parasite infection?

Answer- Typically a stool test is used to determine if a parasite infection is present. Prescription medicines that you can get from a doctor is a typical treatment of an infection.

Question- How do I prevent getting a parasite infection?

Answer- Eat properly cooked meats, and washing your hands before eating and after using the restroom. See a doctor for any symptoms that may be from a parasite infection.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

10 Ways to Relieve Stress



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Anyone can be affected by stress regardless of age, gender, race or ethnicity. Stress is a physical, mental, and emotional factor that causes tension and strain on the mind and body. The causes of stress can be both external and internal. External stress factors can be environmental, psychological, social and work situations. Internal stress comes from inside the body; including mental and physical illnesses. It is very important to deal with stress properly because it can eventually cause many medical conditions. Some psychological conditions that may be of concern are: depression, anxiety, irritable bowel syndrome, high blood pressure, diabetes, and poor healing. Managing stress is extremely important. Stress is a part of life, but the healthier you are, the better you’re able to manage stress when it happens.

There are numerous ways a person can relieve and manage stress. Here are some relaxing and quick fix treatments which can help with stress:

1. Be Present

It is important in our busy lives to stop and focus on one thing. Taking a few minutes to focus on one behavior such as noticing how air feels on your face when you’re walking or how your feet feel hitting the ground - can take away some stress.

2. Breathe Deeply

Stop what you’re doing and sit down to focus on your breath for five minutes. Keep your eyes closed and take slow, deep breaths in through your nose and out through your mouth.

3. Meditate

Practicing meditation a few minutes each day helps ease anxiety and tension. According to psychologist Robbie Maller Hartman, PhD, research suggests that daily meditation may alter the brain’s neural pathways, which make you more resilient to stress.

To meditate: sit up straight with both feet on the floor and close your eyes. Try to focus your attention on reciting either out loud or silently a positive mantra such as “I feel at peace” or “I love myself.” Place one hand on your belly to sync the mantra with your breaths. Let go of any stress or distractions from your thoughts.

4. Reach Out

Talking to a friend and reaching out to your peers can help you with managing stress. Share your thoughts and feelings and whatever it is going on in your life and they can give you a fresh perspective while keeping your connection strong.

5. Tune in to Your Body

Take some time to think to yourself and mentally scan your body to get a sense of how stress affects it each day. Do this in a position you feel comfortable with: sit, stand, or lie down. Begin down at your toes and work your way up to your scalp and notice how your body feels.

6. Listen to Music

It has been proven that listening to soothing music can lower blood pressure, heart rate, and anxiety.

7. Laugh Out Loud

Laughing lightens your day and releases a lot of stress that you are hold inside of you. When you laugh it lowers your cortisol (your body’s stress hormone) while boosting chemicals called endorphins, which help improve your mood. A few things you can do is turning on your favorite sitcom or movie, reading comics, or chatting with someone who makes your smile.

8. Decompress

Place a warm heat wrap around your neck and shoulder for 10 minutes. Relax your face, neck, upper chest, and back muscles and close your eyes. Remove the wrap and use a tennis ball or foam roller to massage away the tension.

9. Get Moving

Exercise such as running, yoga, or walking can ease depression and anxiety. While doing any of these exercises the brain releases feel-good chemicals and gives your body a chance to practice and deal with stress.

10. Be Grateful

Keep a gratitude journal around in areas that will be easy for you to access; it could be by your bed, in your purse, or in your car, etc. According to Jonic Emmerling, a wellness coach in Greenville, NC, being grateful for your blessings cancels out negative thoughts and worries. When you start to feel stressed just pull out the journal and take a few minutes to look through it keeping in mind what really matters in your life.

Source:

http://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/blissing-out-10-relaxation-techniques-reduce-stress-spot?page=3

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The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

Talc: Is It In Your Makeup? by Bree Ogden

BreeHave you heard of talc? Talc (hydrous magnesium silicate) is a natural occurring mineral mostly used in foods, drugs and cosmetics. What makes talc great in cosmetics and personal care products such as baby powder is its absorbent and anti-caking effects.  What’s dangerous about talc is it can be contaminated with asbestos fibers, which poses a risk for respiratory toxicity and cancer. The natural state of talc is a hard thick rock, but when it’s chopped and crushed, it forms a powder, which is why it’s commonly found in cosmetic shadows, blushes and other personal products. I’m sure many of you have heard and used baby and body powder. What’s the main ingredient in baby and body powder you ask? That’s right, talc (sometimes referred to as talcum powder). Recently, talc-based baby and body powder have been linked to an increase of ovarian and reproductive cancers which is why you need to avoid it.

Nowadays, people are growing more conscious about what they put in and on their bodies. Since your skin is your largest organ, it’s important to be more aware of what you put on it. Scientists have shown when talc-cosmetics such as blush, bronzer and shadows are applied on the skin; it can be absorbed into the bloodstream and disrupt internal organs. Since cosmetic-grade talc is non-regulated by the federal government, it’s uncertain how much talc is in one product versus another. Most cosmetics have talc listed as their first ingredient – if you don’t believe me, look for it!

Your best bet is to stay away from talc and try other alternatives, such as natural/mineral powders (despite the irony that talc is a mineral), cornstarch, or rice powder for oil absorption. Some companies are starting to showcase their ‘talc-free’ make up lines such as: Physicians Formula, Burt’s Bees, Smashbox and The Honest Company (just to name a few). There are even apps you can download such as SkinDeep, where you can scan barcodes and it will tell you if the product contains high-risk chemical ingredients. Do yourself a favor and become a label detective – this goes with food too! Understanding toxic and harmful ingredients and decoding what they really are will allow you to be consumer savvy and save yourself from future damage. A couple of other harmful ingredients to be on the lookout are: parabens, formaldehyde, nitrosamine and propylene glycol. Most people have been shopping with their eyes closed – until now. Let’s turn the light on and spread the word about these dangerous ingredients. Beauty and health go hand in hand. When you balance beauty and health, mixed with chemical-free products and foods, it means an overall healthier you!

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

The Rotator Cuff by Daniel Jo

Daniel_outsideThe rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that help stabilize the shoulder. They also aid in movement. Each time you pull an item toward you or lift your arm over your head, you are using your rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is a common spot for injuries. The most common are tears, strains, tendinitis, and bursitis.

Rotator cuff injuries can range from mild to severe. They tend to fall into one of three categories:

  1. Tendinitis is an injury caused by overuse of the rotator cuff. This causes it to become inflamed. Tennis players who serve overhead and painters who reach upward to paint may commonly experience this injury.

  2. Bursitis is another common rotator cuff injury. It is caused by inflammation of the bursa, which are fluid-filled sacs in the rotator cuff that aid in motion. This typically occurs after an injury or degenerative damage to the rotator cuff.

  3. Rotator cuff strains or tears are caused by overuse or acute injury. The tendons that connect muscles to bones can overstretch (strain) or tear, partially or completely. The same can be true for rotator cuff muscles. For example, a baseball pitcher who frequently uses the rotator cuff to throw would experience this type of injury. Untreated tendinitis commonly causes these injuries.


The rotator cuff can also strain or tear after a fall, a car accident, or another sudden injury. These injuries typically cause intense and immediate pain. Rotator cuff injuries can be acute or degenerative. Acute injuries are the result of previous injuries. These can be caused by lifting objects that are too heavy, falling, or breaking the collarbone. Young people are more likely to experience this type of rotator cuff injury.

Degenerative injuries are due to long-term overuse. People most at risk for these injuries include:

  • Athletes, particularly tennis players, baseball players, rowers, and wrestlers

  • People with jobs that require repetitive lifting, such as painters and carpenters

  • People above 40 years of age


Not all rotator cuff injuries cause pain. Because some are the result of degenerative conditions, the rotator cuff could be damaged for months or years before symptoms start to appear. Common rotator cuff injury symptoms include:

  • Avoiding certain activities because they cause pain

  • Difficulty achieving full range of shoulder motion

  • Difficulty sleeping on the affected shoulder

  • Pain or tenderness when reaching overhead

  • Pain in the shoulder, especially at night

  • Progressive weakness of the shoulder

  • Trouble reaching behind the back


If you have been experiencing shoulder symptoms for longer than a week or lose function in your arm, see your doctor. Doctors use a medical history, a physical exam, and imaging scans to diagnose rotator cuff injuries. They may ask about physical activities at the workplace. These questions determine whether a patient has an increased risk for a degenerative condition. The doctor also tests the arm’s range of motion and strength. He or she will also rule out similar conditions, such as a pinched nerve or arthritis. Imaging scans, such as an X-ray, can identify any bone spurs. These small bone growths can rub against the rotator cuff tendon. They cause weakening and inflammation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound scans can also be used. These tools examine soft tissues, including the tendons and muscles. They can help identify tears, as well as show how large and old the tears are. Treatments range from resting the affected arm to surgery. Tendinitis can progress to a rotator cuff tear, and a rotator cuff tear can enlarge.

Nonsurgical treatments improve symptoms in about 50 percent of people with a rotator cuff injury. These treatments include:

  • Applying hot or cold packs to the affected shoulder to reduce swelling

  • Exercises to restore strength and range of motion

  • Injecting the affected area with cortisone, a steroid that helps to reduce inflammation

  • Resting the affected arm and wearing a sling to isolate arm motions

  • Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen and naproxen


According to the AAOS, no research indicates that timing of surgery affects outcomes. This means if you have a rotator cuff injury, your doctor is likely to first try nonsurgical methods. Pain is different for each person. A shoulder injury that lasts longer than six months indicates a very large tear or significant loss of function and strength in the arm. These cases usually require surgery.

The prognosis for a rotator cuff injury depends upon the injury type. According to the Mayo Clinic, half of those with a rotator cuff injury recover using exercise and at-home care. These interventions reduce pain and encourage range of motion. In the case of a more severe rotator cuff tear, shoulder strength may not improve unless the injury is surgically corrected. Athletes and people with occupations that require using the shoulder should take frequent rest breaks. This can reduce the load on the shoulder. Exercises to strengthen the shoulder and encourage range of motion also can help. Examples include stretching a straight arm across the chest or stretching the arms over the head. In the case of shoulder pain, icing the affected area can help reduce swelling. Apply ice in a cloth-covered pack for no more than 10 minutes at a time. These activities can also help prevent re-injury.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

Thyroid Disorders by Nathan Kiskila, M.D.



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The thyroid is a small, highly vascular, butterfly-shaped gland at the front of the neck. It is stimulated by TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) to produce thyroid hormones: T4 and T3, which in turn, influence body metabolism, growth, and development. Many people, especially women ages between 20-40 years old, suffer from thyroid dysfunctions. Symptoms can vary from very mild to severe, and if not treated they may became a life-threatening emergency.

The most common thyroid problems result from abnormal levels of circulating thyroid hormones. Hyperthyroidism occurs when patient has excessive thyroid hormones circulating throughout her/his body. It is detected by a simple blood test and presents with decreased TSH and elevated T4. The most common symptoms are: heart palpitations, elevated BP, weight loss, agitation, heat intolerance, nausea, bulging eyes, and enlarged goiter. People with hyperthyroidism, who are not on any medications to correct it, are at risk for thyroid storm, a potentially fatal acute episode of thyroid activity. Thyroid storm can be triggered by stress, illness, infection, or medication overdose. Hyperthyroidism may be also caused by Graves’ disease, an autoimmune disorder in which a patient develops antibodies to the TSH receptor, which attach to the receptor and stimulate gland to release more thyroid hormones than necessary. Treatment of hyperthyroidism is based on bringing circulating thyroid hormone levels back to normal. Patients are usually put on beta-blockers like Propranolol to control heart arrhythmias, along with antithyroid medications like PTU (Propylthiuracil). These medications inhibit the synthesis of thyroid hormones or iodine to decrease vascularity of the gland and decrease the release of thyroid hormones into circulation. A patient with hyperthyroidism should be on high calorie diet, 4,000-5,000 kcal/day to satisfy hunger and prevent tissue breakdown.

Hypothyroidism, on the other hand, results from inadequate thyroid hormone secretion, and requires lifelong thyroid hormone replacement. Patients are usually prescribed Levothyroxine to correct thyroid deficiency and Cytomel to replace the T3 hormone. Hypothyroidism may be caused by the following: destruction of thyroid tissue which is an autoimmune disorder called Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, pituitary disease, iodine deficiency, discontinuation of thyroid supplement, and amiodarone or lithium intake. Patients who suffer from hypothyroidism show symptoms of fatigue, weight gain, increased triglycerides and lipids, hypotension, constipation, cold intolerance, and activity intolerance. Untreated hypothyroidism may lead to mixedema coma, a life-threatening condition manifested by severe hypotension, hypothermia, hypoglycemia, and eventually coma.

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The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

“I Think I have a Sinus Infection” by David G. Porzio, M.D., FACC

Porzio webSinus infections occur when fluid is trapped or blocked in the sinuses, allowing germs to grow.  A sinus infection, or acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) has two basic causes: viral or bacterial. I am sure you have heard this before but it bears repeating; the overwhelming majority of patients with a sinus infection have the viral form (98%), not bacterial (2%). Both viral and bacterial sinus infections share very similar symptoms and can be sometimes difficult to discern from each other clinically.  I would like to describe the clinical manifestations of sinus infections, how to try and differentiate bacterial from viral and treatment.

Sinus infections, whether bacterial or viral in nature have the following common clinical features:

  • More than 4 weeks of purulent (yellow-green) nasal discharge

  • Nasal obstruction

  • Facial pain or pressure

  • Ear fullness, cough, loss of smell, headache


Not all of these symptoms need be present. Other conditions that share these symptoms are the common cold and allergies.  Differentiating viral and bacterial can often be challenging.  The clinical presentation alone cannot distinguish viral from bacterial sinus infections because the physical examination demonstrates no distinguishing features to separate the two. Guidelines published by The Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2012 suggest the following three criteria may be helpful in determining if a patient has a bacterial sinus infection:

  • Persistent symptoms of a sinus infection lasting more than 10 days. In general, a viral form begins to show resolution by day 10.

  • Severe symptoms or high fever greater than 102 F with a purulent nasal discharge or facial pain for three to four consecutive days at symptom onset.

  • Worsening of symptoms of a sinus infection with high fever and purulent nasal discharge after five to six days of an illness that appeared to be improving.


 

Treatment for Viral

Because the overriding majority of cases of sinus infections are viral (0.5 to 2.0% bacterial), the initial treatment is aimed at symptomatic relief: antihistamines like Claritin, Allegra, Zyrtec with or without Sudafed, cough suppressant (dextromethoropham). Of course rest, fluids, and pain relief medications like acetaminophen and ibuprofen are helpful as well. It is important to realize that the treatment recommendations provided will not resolve or eliminate the symptoms of a viral sinus infection completely; only time (7-10 days) and your body’s immune system will accomplish that.


Treatment for Bacterial

If a patient does have clinical features of a bacterial sinus infection, then antibiotic therapy is warranted. There are treatment algorithms available for the management of bacterial sinus infections that take into consideration the recent antibiotic use, duration of symptoms, response to initial treatment and so on. For the sake of simplicity, the initial treatment of a bacterial sinus infection is the above mentioned OTC medications and a broad spectrum antibiotic. The drug of first choice is Augmentin, which is a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. In patients with a penicillin allergy, azithromycin (Z-pak) can be used, but in my experience is not as effective. In patients who fail the first round, drugs like cefdinir and Levofloxacin provide an even broader spectrum of coverage. In addition, these patients can sometimes improve with the use of either nasal steroids (Flonase) or oral steroids (prednisone). In the case of patients who remain symptomatic after multiple rounds of antibiotics and steroids, referral to an Ear-Nose-Throat (ENT) specialist and possible CT scan of the sinuses is the next appropriate step.

In sum, sinus infections are a very common form of infection in the urgent care setting. The vast majority of cases are due to viruses with a small percentage having secondary bacterial infection. The clinical features of the two causes are similar with some clinical criteria that can help the treating physician attempt to determine if bacterial infection is present. Treatment focuses on common sense with OTC medications, rest and fluids (the mainstay of therapy). If an antibiotic is deemed necessary, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid is the drug of first choice with azithromycin available for those allergic to penicillin-class antibiotics. In the case of treatment failure, broader spectrum antibiotics and steroids are often used. In those patients who fail to improve with these therapies or have recurrent episodes throughout the year, referral to an ENT specialist is often advised.

I hope this article on ARS has been helpful and that you have a better understanding of what goes through your doctor’s mind when you come in and say..."I think I have a sinus infection.”

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Letter from Dr. Rose

dr. roseTo My Valued Patients and Friends,

In 1982 I founded Pacific Beach Urgent Care with a simple mission: to provide high-quality, accessible, and affordable care to our community seven days a week. Over the past thirty-five years we have treated patients from our local community and from around the world. It has been the greatest journey of my lifetime, and I continue to be overjoyed with magnificent memories of caring for our patients.

As my beautiful wife and I plan to move more fully into our retirement, we have sought to find a medical group that could continue our legacy of caring for the community in the way we have done for so long. After much consideration, we have selected Marque Urgent Care to carry on our mission of exemplary medical treatment.

We are happy to announce that exciting changes are coming immediately. Marque Urgent Care is an esteemed provider of walk-in medical services, and they bring a unique patient-centered approach to the area unlike any other. They have operations throughout Southern California and are an active supporter of the communities they serve. I am honored to entrust them with the Pacific Beach Urgent Care name, a name that I hold dear to my heart.

The familiar faces of your favorite providers and staff will be here for you, and they are excited to be part of the Marque team.  You’ll probably be seeing me around your neighborhood promoting the transition.

As I’ve told my patients in the past, the best way to optimum health is to make time for yourself every day. Watch the sunset and spend time with those people in your life that make you happy. I know I will…

Thank you for your continued support over the years and for entrusting us with your health. You’re in great hands.

Dr. Nathaniel Rose

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