Put the Pep Back into Your Step – B12 Shots by Your Marque Team

Are you feeling fatigue or lethargic? Maybe faint or dizzy? You might be experiencing vitamin B12 deficiency. Many patients suffer the symptoms from vitamin B12 deficiency and might not even know it.  Vitamin B12 is an essential water-soluble vitamin that:

  • Helps in the functioning of DNA synthesis

  • Energy production

  • Neurological function

  • Red blood cell formation

  • And much more.


Some patients are unable to break down the protein to absorb vitamin B12 into the bloodstream while others are at risk for low levels of B12 because of the food consumed don’t contain high enough amounts of B12, such as vegetarians or vegans. Patients can also be at risk for low levels of B12 if they are taking certain medications such as antacids or antihistamines, which can block the absorption of B12.

What can vitamin B12 do for me?

Vitamin B12 is a crucial vitamin needed for metabolic and hormonal functions. It helps with the production of our digestive enzymes and the transporting of nutrients in and out of our cells. Other roles of vitamin B12 is that it helps in the conversion of homocysteine to methionine, which protects cardiovascular health, metabolizing protein and fat, and it also plays a role in fetal development during pregnancy. The benefits of getting B12 shots every month is that it reduces the risk of:

  • Heart disease

  • Vision loss

  • Infertility

  • Neurocognitive disorders


Other beneficial factors to getting the B12 shot is that it:

  • Can reduce depression by restoring mood control and helps aid in retaining memory and mental functions

  • Helps lower fatigue and reduces muscle weakness

  • Can help improve metabolism

  • Help improve low sperm count

  • Help prevent or treat diabetic neuropathy


The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Tips to Alleviate Gastrointestinal (GI) Stress by Your Marque Team

Are you having digestive issues?  Here are some user-friendly tips to help alleviate GI stress:

Fiber helps with constipation.  Cherries, grapes, bell peppers, beans, whole grains and nuts are rich in fiber.  They all help keep your digestion regular.  Your body needs around 20-35 grams of fiber daily.  It also helps keep away weight gain, heart disease, blood sugar (high or low) and hemorrhoids.

Chew gum to help fight heartburn.  It may relieve reflux by stimulating the production of acid neutralizing saliva.   Just make sure to chew every other flavor besides peppermint.

Lose weight to cut gas and heartburn.  Loose just 2 pounds and you could improve gastrointestinal symptoms.  Extra pounds especially around the midsection can worsen digestive issues like heartburn, gas and belching.

Stop bloating and heartburn with smaller meals.  It’s a good way to stop indigestion.  The key is to eat smaller and more frequent meals and eat slower.  It avoids overloading your digestive system and helps shrink stomach capacity.

Drink to stop constipation.  Drinking fluids helps your body get rid of waste to help with constipation.  Eight glasses a day is not enough, drink as much as possible throughout your day.

Get moving to beat bloating.  It may help with most minor digestive problems from bloating to constipation.  Physical activity helps your body’s digestive system.  It moves things and eliminates waste.  It also helps reduce stress a prime irritant of any digestive problems.

Stop smoking to beat heartburn.  When you smoke you wreak havoc on digestion in many ways.  Smoking weakens the valve at the end of the esophagus, which can lead to acid reflux and heart burn.  It also increases the risk for various gastrointestinal cancers.

Drink less alcohol to ease stomach issues.  Alcohol interferes with acid secretion, stomach muscles, and nutrient absorption.  Too many drinks can contribute to heartburn, diarrhea, liver problems and even esophageal cancers.

Maybe dairy is the problem.  Some people find that their bodies can’t digest lactose, the natural sugar in milk.  As a result gas buildup is in your stomach.  Eliminating anything dairy related can help relieve gas issues.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Children and Fractures by Colleen Kraft, M.D.



Although the term fracture may sound serious, it is just another name for a broken bone. Fractures are a very common injury among children under age six. Falls cause most of the fractures in this age group.

A broken bone in a child is different from one in an adult, because young bones are more flexible and have a thicker covering, which makes them better able to absorb shock. Children’s fractures rarely require surgical repair. They usually just need to be kept free of movement, most often through the use of a molded cast.

Most broken bones in children are either “greenstick” fractures, in which the bone bends like green wood and breaks only on one side, or “torus” fractures, in which the bone is buckled and twisted but not completely broken. A “bend” fracture refers to a bone that is bent but not broken. “Complete” fractures, in which the bone breaks all the way through, also occur in young children.

There are three types of fractures that may require surgery. A “displaced” fracture, where the ends are separated or out of alignment, an elbow fracture, or a fracture through the child’s growth plate (an area at the end of the bone that regulates further growth) may require surgery and longer term follow up by an orthopedic surgeon.

Fractures also are classified as “non-displaced,” when the broken ends are still in proper position, or “displaced,” when the ends are separated or out of alignment. In an “open” or “compound” fracture, the bone sticks through the skin. If the skin is intact, the fracture is “closed.”

Signs and Symptoms:

It’s not always easy to tell when a bone is broken, especially if your child is too young to describe what he’s feeling. Ordinarily with a fracture, you will see swelling and your child will clearly be in pain and unable—or unwilling—to move the injured limb. However, just because your child can move the bone doesn’t necessarily rule out a fracture.

Home Treatment—Until your child can be examined:

  1. You can use an ice pack with a child older than two; cold can cause skin injury to the delicate skin of younger children.

  2. Do not give the child anything by mouth to drink or relieve pain without first consulting your doctor.

  3. If part of the injury is open and bleeding, or if bone is protruding through the skin, place firm pressure on the wound; then cover it with clean (preferably sterile) gauze. Do not try to put the bone back underneath the skin. Call 911 and let paramedics supervise transportation and help make your child comfortable.

  4. Until your child can be seen in the pediatrician’s office, emergency room, or urgent care center, use an improvised sling or rolled-up newspaper or magazine as a splint to protect the injury from unnecessary movement.


 

Professional Treatment:

After examining the break, the doctor will order X rays to determine the extent of the damage. If the doctor suspects that the bone’s growth plate is affected, or if the bones are out of line, an orthopedic consultation will be necessary.

Because children’s bones heal rapidly and well, a plaster or fiberglass cast, or sometimes just an immobilizing splint, is all that is needed for most minor fractures. For a displaced fracture, an orthopedic surgeon may have to realign the bones. This may be done as a “closed reduction,” in which the surgeon uses local or general anesthesia, manipulates the bones until they’re straight, and then applies a cast. An “open reduction” is a surgical procedure done in an operating room, but this is rarely necessary for children.

Usually casting brings a decrease in pain. If your child has an increase in pain, numbness, or pale or blue fingers or toes, call your doctor immediately. These are signs of swelling. To relieve the pressure, the doctor may split the cast, open a window in it, or replace it with a larger one. You should also let your doctor know if the cast breaks or become wet and soggy, as the cast needs to be intact to help the bone heal.

Bones that have been broken will sometimes form a hard knot at the site of the break during the healing process. As the bone remodels, it will resume its normal shape within in a few months.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Probiotics by Carlos Perez

Probiotics have been known to help the human body in many ways and they have become a popular supplement in recent years.  They are live bacteria and yeasts that can bolster your digestive system.  Probiotics may offer benefits and relief from minor to serious conditions such as diarrhea, constipation, vaginal and urinary tract infections, and IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), Crohn's disease, and bladder cancer. Different stains of these live micro-organisms offer different health benefits from oral health to intestinal and weight gain prevention.

Antibiotics kill the "good" bacteria in your body.  It can be a helpful to consume probiotics when you are done with your medication to replenish the "good" bacteria to keep your body functioning properly.

Probiotics are in demand, and as a result, the price of these supplements have increased.  Although many different types of supplements are available, it’s significant to note that there are foods which contain natural forms of probiotics.  This is a cost-effective way to get a similar result without having to swallow a daily pill.  There are a variety of foods that contain probiotics to choose from such as yogurt, sauerkraut, miso, cottage cheese, kefir, sauerkraut, tempeh, kimchi, kombucha, and pickles.

It is important to keep in mind that our bodies work differently; one type of probiotic which helps one person may not be as beneficial for another. Be sure to get informed and educated on which probiotic will be more beneficial for your needs. There are numerous brands available – a doctor can provide insightful knowledge to help you select a probiotic that will yield the most benefits for your health.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Back to School Vaccines by Your Marque Team

As we approach the beginning of a new school year, we must consider California’s law requiring all students to show proof of certain vaccinations before enrolling in classes. This law applies to students of all ages from preschool to college.  Immunization requirements are intended to reduce the risk of spreading vaccine-preventable diseases.

By the definition, a vaccine is a suspension of organisms or a fraction of organisms used to induce immunity. There are two types of vaccines:

  • Attenuated vaccines which contain live organisms that are less virulent.

  • Inactivated vaccines which contain either inactive microbe, toxin, or a few proteins from the pathogen.


Most of vaccines have to be given multiple times in order to be fully effective, and some of them have to be repeated periodically. Based on statistics, since vaccines have become available, the spread of different diseases has dropped significantly. By vaccinating your children, you not only protect them from life-threatening illnesses but you also protect your whole family and friends.

The majority of vaccines are administered to newborn babies within the first two years of their life, in order to build up their immunity. By the time your child starts preschool he or she should receive:

  • 4 doses of Tdap. This vaccine protects from three different bacteria: tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Each of them can lead to very serious diseases or even death. Tetanus enters the body through cuts or broken skin and causes severe muscle pain and "locking" of the jaw. The other two bacteria are airborne, spread by coughing or sneezing. Since the vaccine has been available, according to CDC, the spread of bacteria dropped as much as 90%. However, just last year more than 48,000 Americans suffered from whooping cough, caused by pertussis because they did not receive the vaccine.

  • 3 doses of Hepatitis B vaccine, given within a 6 month period. This vaccine protects from liver disease caused by the Hepatitis B virus. The number of individuals suffering from Hepatitis B disease drastically decreased since 1990, when the vaccine began being routinely administered to children.

  • 2 doses of MMR. Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) are airborne viruses that can cause rash, headache, muscle pain and may lead to seizures, brain damage or even death. All three diseases were very common among children before the vaccine became available.

  • 3 doses of Polio. This disease was very common before 1955, when Polio vaccine was introduced to the public. It is spread by direct contact with an infected person, and causes paralysis leading to permanent disability or death.

  • 1 dose of Varicella. This vaccine protects from chickenpox and it was approved for administration in 1995.

  • 3 doses of Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae type B) vaccine, which prevents meningitis, pneumonia, and throat infections.


Before you enroll your child in kindergarten, in addition to the vaccines listed above, he or she will need another dose of DTaP and Polio.

Middle school students must receive:

  • Tdap vaccine. This vaccine was approved for administration in 2005, in place of TD (Tetanus and Diphtheria). Children have to be vaccinated before they enter seventh grade because by this time the immunity that was induced by DTaP in earlier years has worn off.  In fact, Tdap and TD vaccines should be repeated every 10 years to be fully effective. Tdap should be also given to the individuals who work with children or have contact with newborn babies.

  • HPV vaccination, also known as Gardasil, is another recommended vaccine for middle school children, however, not required. According to the CDC, more than half of men and women in the United States, who are sexually active, have been infected with HPV - human papillomavirus. For the most part, the virus does not cause many severe symptoms and can self-resolve. However, it may lead to cervical cancer in women and throat cancer in both men and women. Therefore, in order to prevent those types of cancers, individuals should be given the HPV vaccine. The effectiveness of HPV immunization is much higher when administered at a younger age, before any sexual activity takes place. It is offered in three doses administered within a 6 month period.

  • Meningococcal vaccine is also recommended for middle school students. It protects against meningitis which is an infection of the brain and spinal cord.


College students are required to show they have immunity to hepatitis B, MMR, and varicella (chickenpox). If immunization records from previous years are not available, a simple blood test can be ordered by the physician to check the levels for each of these vaccines. Also, students have to be up to date with the Tdap vaccine (it is good for 10 years), and they should receive a meningococcal booster.

In addition to the above mentioned immunizations, every child and adult should be given the flu vaccine annually. This vaccine protects against influenza virus which is very contagious. It is spread by cough and sneezing. Most common symptoms are: high fever, tachycardia (elevated heart rate), cough, and muscle aches, which usually go away on its own within few days. However, sometimes flu can turn into very severe illnesses, especially among patients with compromised immunity, or other health problems.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
 

Difficulty with Sleep? By Your Marque Team

The Importance of Sleep

Sleep is very important for the functioning of our bodies as it helps restore the immune, nervous, skeletal and muscle systems. Without restful sleep, these bodily functions will not work optimally. Sleep deprivation can cause a multitude of health issues. It is well known and studied that there are associations with increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, immune disorders and cognitive impairment in people that do not sleep well. Studies have shown that sleeping better promotes longevity.

Sleep Help, Sleep Hygiene and Stimulants

There are many things you can do to improve your sleep. One of the best things you can do is to avoid stimulants. Stimulants affecting sleep can be broken down into many categories. There are drinks that can be stimulating such as those containing caffeine and alcohol. There are foods that can be stimulating including chocolate, certain fruits and foods containing MSG (monosodium glutamate). Even foods rich in aged cheese contain a substance called tyramine that affects sleep. There are drugs and medications that can be stimulating. These can include certain prescription medications such as steroids, mood and anxiety medications (SSRI and similar medications), and ADHD medications (containing amphetamine like substance). Certain supplements such as Ginseng can be stimulating. Even chemicals in toothpaste such as Triclosan may affect sleep. There are also other environmental stimulants that one should be careful of such as bright artificial light. This is now very common with use of smartphones.

Sleep Tips

  • Avoid food and drink stimulants as listed above, especially several hours before bed or even entirely.

  • Avoid TV and smart phone use while in bed preparing for sleep.

  • Make sure your bedroom is dark and noise free when trying to sleep.

  • Avoid exercise before going to sleep.

  • Discuss use of stimulating medications with your doctor if having difficulty with sleep.


 

Supplements and Medication

There are options to help with poor sleep if the things above do not help. Most over-the-counter sleep aids use anti-histamines as they have a side effect of drowsiness. These can unfortunately cause daytime grogginess or drowsiness and can have other unwanted side effects. Prescription medications are an option but most are considered controlled substances and can be discussed with your doctor. Melatonin and herbal sleep aids are an option also and are available without prescription.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.