5 Steps to a Better Night’s Sleep by Your Marque Team

When Daylight Saving time ends or begins, this means we’ll change our clocks by one hour. Although the term "spring forward and fall back" indicates which way we turn the clock, this simple action each spring and fall doesn't necessarily result in our body clock changing immediately.

Internal Body Clock

Our primary body clock, located in the brain, keeps track of a handful of behavioral functions in sync with each other– such as temperature, digestive function and hormone production. It also determines when we are alert and sleepy.  This process is called a circadian rhythm which it keeps its own time. When the transition onto or off daylight savings time occurs, our circadian rhythm is out of sync by an hour. This is similar to having mild jet lag.

"Falling back " is usually no problem because we tend to feel sleepy a little earlier than usual and wake up earlier as well. To help with sleep here are 8 tips to make sure to are well rested:

  1. Have an omega-rich breakfast. Omega 3s are healthy fats which lower anxiety while producing hormones that help you fall asleep. Chia seeds or walnuts are high in these omegas. Try adding these to your morning meal.

  2. Limit caffeine intake. While coffee is good for you, limit your intake after 2pm so it won’t interfere with your sleep.

  3. Set a kitchen curfew. Limit heavy meals and alcohol before bed. Eating late can affect falling to sleep. Set a kitchen curfew for 7pm so that you can get to sleep at a decent hour.

  4. Keep your bedroom cool. Insomniacs have a warmer core temperature. Keeping your bedroom between 65-67 degrees will help you fall to sleep easier.

  5. Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day. Studies show if you go to bed and wake up at the same time, it will cause you to have better quality of sleep and your circadian rhythm will be in sync to the point where you may not need an alarm.

  6. Try a melatonin supplement. If you are having trouble sleeping, a low dose of melatonin can be way to help fall asleep faster.

  7. Use lavender essential oil. Lavender essential oil promotes calming. Putting some in a diffuser in your bedroom or applying some to the soles of your feet will help with falling asleep.

  8. Take a relaxing bath or shower. Taking a hot bath or shower 90 minutes before bed can help you relax and improve your quality of sleep.


 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Cellulitis by Kristen Wheeler

What is cellulitis?

Cellulitis is a type of bacterial skin infection that affects the deep layers of our skin.   MRSA, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus are two common bacteria that can cause cellulitis.  Bacteria enters a tear in our skin resulting in infection.  Cellulitis can appear on any part of the body, but is usually found on arms, lower legs, and the face.

Symptoms

An example of symptoms can be redness of the area, warm to the touch, pain, skin dimpling, tenderness, swelling, fever, fatigue, and swollen lymph nodes.  The affected area can spread to other areas.   Complications of cellulitis can include infection in the bloodstream or to other tissue.

Who’s at risk to get cellulitis?

Individuals with compromised immune systems with conditions like diabetes or HIV.  Any cut, fracture, burn or a scrape.  Bug bites, animal bites, open wounds, blisters, surgical incisions, athletes’ foot, dermatitis, eczema, lymphedema and more.  Even being overweight or obese increases your risk of cellulitis.

Prognosis

To get the appropriate prognosis, you must be evaluated by a physician.  Sometimes a skin, blood, puss, or tissue culture is done.

Treatment

Oral and intravenous antibiotics are used to treat cellulitis, but do not always kill the bacteria.  To name a few oral antibiotics like clindamycin, doxycycline, and cephalexin can be used to treat cellulitis.  Sometimes IV antibiotics are required.  If there is an abscess, sometimes the provider must cut it open and drain it.

Prevention

Wash your wound gently and daily with soap and water.  Apply protective ointment and cover the area with a bandage daily.  Keep it clean and dry.  Watch for signs of infection.  Trim your fingernails and toenails carefully, so the surrounding skin is not injured.  Moisturize your skin to prevent cracking and peeling.

Complication of cellulitis can be dangerous.  It can cause tissue damage or tissue death.  Cellulitis can also spread to the blood, bones, lymph system, heart, or nervous system.  Left untreated, these infections can turn into amputation, shock, or even death.

https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/qa/what-is-cellulitis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellulitis

https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/skin-disorders/bacterial-skin-infections/cellulitis

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cellulitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20370762

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caffeine: Pros and Cons by Marianne Leffert

What is caffeine and where does it come from? Caffeine is a natural stimulating chemical found in familiar products like soda, tea, energy drinks, and coffee. Caffeine is naturally found in about 60 plant types such as cocoa beans, kola nuts, and tea leaves. It works when entering our central nervous system, usually taken orally in a drink or pill form.  As early as 10 minutes after ingesting caffeine you will start feeling the side effects. At about 45 minutes after ingesting caffeine we will get about 99% of the full effects lasting anywhere from 4-8 hours.

Because caffeine is a stimulant some possible side effects include: elevated heart rate, insomnia, nervousness, restlessness or jittery feeling, irritable bowels, nausea or vomiting, increased respirations, and elevated blood pressure. If caffeine is taken in larger doses (i.e. 6 or more cups of coffee per day) can cause anxiety, chest pain and headaches, even cause irregular heartbeats.

With all these side effects, why are there so many products produced containing caffeine? When taken in moderation, (i.e. 2-3 cups of coffee a day) there are many temporary benefits of caffeine that have been found. Such as being more alert and having a better ability to concentrate.  This is especially true with those who have chronic fatigue or sleep deprivation. It can also alleviate headaches or tension migraines.  When consumed in moderation, it has also been proven to reduce the risk of diabetes and lowering our hemoglobin A1c. Coffee consumption may aid in those who have constipation, although this has been mixed results. Caffeine has even proven to reduce the risk in certain cancers such as throat or liver cancer and even prostate cancer. It has even been known to help in aiding those who are asthmatic with airway function for up to 4 hours.

Many athletes will promote energy drinks because it is proven to enhance athletic performance on such a wide spectrum. It has proven to increase strength and power output, high intensity cardio and aerobic exercise. It can increase our bodies responsiveness to testosterone and adrenaline.

Here are some recommended caffeine dosages from WebMd:

  • For headache or improving mental alertness: 250 mg per day.

  • For tiredness: 150-600 mg.

  • For improving athletic performance: 2-10 mg/kg or more has been used. However, doses in excess of 800 mg per day can result in urine levels greater than the 15 mcg/mL allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

  • For weight loss: the ephedrine/caffeine combination products are commonly dosed 20 mg/200 mg three times per day.

  • For headache after epidural anesthesia: 300 mg.One cup of brewed coffee provides from 95-200 mg of caffeine. An 8-ounce serving of black tea provides from 40-120 mg of caffeine. An 8-ounce serving of green tea provides 15-60 mg of caffeine. Soft drinks such as cola provide from 20-80 mg of caffeine per 12 ounce serving. Sports or energy drinks typically provide from 48-300 mg of caffeine per serving.


Is caffeine addictive? Since caffeine is a stimulant, daily use can cause a physical dependency. Let us say you have a few cups of coffee every morning, as many people do to jumpstart their day. If you were to abruptly stop having your coffee or any caffeine intake, you may experience some symptoms of withdrawal for a couple of days until your body adjusts back from the physical dependency. Some common side effects are headache, extra fatigue, irritability, and difficulty concentrating. Caffeine dependency is not considered a serious addiction or harmful like street drugs or alcohol.

Sources:

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-979/caffeine

https://www.webmd.com/diet/caffeine-directory

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/271707.php

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

Common Summer Health Issues to Avoid by Your Marque Team

Health issues can get in the way of your summer fun and you don’t want that happening. Some common ailments are bed bugs, heat rash, food poisoning and swimmer’s ear. Here’s how to spot, treat and prevent these common problems, and what to do if they strike.

BED BUGS

The kids are out of school, so you take a vacation and stay at a hotel. So does EVERYONE else. The peak season for bed bugs is June through October. The increase in heat and humidity during the summer and early fall months has the effect of making bed bugs more active. Make sure you check the beds in the hotel rooms as well as your own beds at home just to be safe.

How to spot signs of bed bugs:

  • Look for rusty or reddish stains on bed sheets or mattresses caused by bed bugs being crushed.

  • Dark spots (about this size: •), which are bed bug excrement and may bleed on the fabric like a markbed_buger would.

  • Eggs and eggshells, which are tiny (about 1mm) and pale yellow skins that nymphs shed as they grow larger.

  • Live bed bugs.


 

Where bed bugs hide:

When not feeding, bed bugs hide in a variety of places. Around the bed, they can be found near the piping, seams and tags of the mattress and box spring, and in cracks on the bed frame and headboard.

Preventing bed bugs:

At home, try not storing your luggage under your bed. Ideally, luggage should be stored in a basement or garage. Other tips include decluttering your home, vacuuming more often and keeping belongings separate when taken to school or work.

HEAT RASH


With our high temperatures in Southern California, heat rash can be a very common, yet real concern. If you sweat enough, your sweat glands can actually get blocked, and the excess moisture can cause skin irritation, itching, and redness. The best way to prevent this from happening is by staying cool. Drink plenty of cool water, wear light clothing that breathes, and try to avoid staying in the sun for too long.  If you do see signs of heat rash, cool your body (in an air conditioned place or with a fan) or take a cool shower and let your body air dry.  Do not use any oil based lotions because you don’t want to block your sweat glands.  Heat rash should self-resolve within a few days.

FOOD POISONING


When food is left in the heat for an extended periods of time, bacteria grows. Food poisoning is more common during the summer because the microorganisms that cause it grow most quickly when the temperature is between 90 and 100 degrees. Nearly 300,000 people are hospitalized annually due to food poisoning.  Make sure your food stays in a cool place while on the beach or picnicking.  Use extra care to foods that contain mayonnaise, dairy, eggs or meat products.  Keep them cool because they can start to develop bacteria within several hours of being unrefrigerated.

Food poisoning symptoms:

Symptoms of food poisoning include upset stomach, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and dehydration. Symptoms may range from mild to severe.

SWIMMER'S EAR

Ear infections can be really painful and can keep you out of the pool and ocean. No one wants that during the summertime! It’s often caused by water remaining in the ear after you go swimming. This can create a moist environment inside the ear, which helps bacteria to grow. The best way to avoid swimmer’s ear is to avoid immersing your head entirely in the water, or if you do, do not go too deep. You can also try wearing earplugs. Do NOT use Q-tips or cotton swabs to clean your ears, this will make it worse. In most cases, a doctor will prescribe ear drops and be advised to keep the ear dry.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Eating by Jessica Medina



Did you know that 60% of American men and women are considered obese? This is a result of a lack of exercise and poor eating habits. Although exercise is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle, healthy eating is critical since your diet can greatly impact your life in a positive or negative way.

Healthy eating starts at home with the meals that we prep. Many people don’t care about what they’re putting in their mouth until they have a health issue like a condition such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or even cases as extreme as coronary artery disease. Most of these problems can be avoided by a healthier diet.

How can you eat healthier and what is considered healthy eating?  Natural, whole foods with minimal processing and added sugar are examples of healthy food choices. A diet filled with colorful fruits and vegetables has a plethora of health benefits- from lowering blood pressure, to helping your eyesight, or helping to fight different types of cancer.

Healthy eating also means knowing the difference between good fats and bad fats. You don’t want to load your body with bad, saturated fats. These types of fats are very common in foods that we love to eat such as fried foods and baked goods. Olive oil is an example of a good fat and one that is beneficial to your body.

Vegetables are proven to help provide your body with essential nutrients necessary for optimal functioning. People who have a diet high in vegetables are less likely to develop diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, or heart disease. Veggies are also high in fiber, which is great to maintain regular bowel movements and relieve constipation. Fruits, beans, nuts, quinoa, and sweet potatoes are also healthy, delicious, high fiber food choices.

If you start making healthy food choices, you are taking steps to save not only your health, but also your bank account.  A healthy diet can cut on the cost of medical bills and insurance, and you’ll reduce your visits to the doctors.  Consume foods that are high in good fats, high in fiber, and high in health benefits.  Drink more water throughout the day because often we confuse thirst for hunger.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Infectious Mononucleosis by Milissa Payne

Mononucleosis, commonly referred to as “the kissing disease,” is an infectious disease typically caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It can also be caused by other viruses. The most common signs and symptoms of mononucleosis are fatigue, sore throat, and swollen lymph nodes in the neck. Mononucleosis is a contagious infection, spreading through the saliva of the infected persons, hence it’s nickname. The disease sometimes goes untreated, as it can be commonly mistaken for strep throat, the flu or fatigue. Symptoms may not show until four to six weeks after infection.

While it is highly contagious and can infect anyone, teenagers and young adults are more susceptible to Mono. College students are especially at risk due to close living situations dormitories. The infection can come with mild problems with serious complications arising in only severe cases. While the effects normally remain mild, Mono can leave a person feeling extremely tired and ill for several months.

A capillary blood test called the Monospot test is the most common way to detect the infection. In quite a few cases, the diagnosis can be made by the observation of clinical symptoms alone. There is no treatment or vaccine for Mono aside from bedrest, fluids, and traditional homecare. It is recommended that persons infected should not share food or drinks or come into close contact with others until symptoms resolve. Those who have Mono do not necessarily need to be quarantined, and many people are actually immune to the infection. Due to the possibility of an enlarged spleen, those diagnosed with Mono are recommended to limit physical activity to prevent rupturing.

Good nutrition, a clean-living environment, and proper hygiene standards are all effective ways to prevent the spread of Mononucleosis. Given its contagious nature and the fact that it is viral so antibiotics cannot be used to combat it, Mono will never be eradicated; however, through behavioral efforts including hygiene, the spread and effects of Mono can be reduced.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Which Types of Injuries Require Physical Therapy?

 

The Scope of Physical Therapy


Physical therapy covers just about everything when it comes to recovery. Although, it may seem to be associated exclusively to sports and orthopedic injuries, there is a larger scope that this type of therapy reaches. For example, physical therapy can help patients dealing with brain disorders and diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. In another dimension, physical therapy can also aid in rehabilitating those who are struggling with a deadly cardiovascular condition. From a simple problem such as a sprained ankle to the complex issues stated above, physical therapy can be the answer to any rehabilitation process within the body.

Below are the types of injuries that require physical therapy:

 

Sport Injuries


Most people have heard of an athlete who tore their ACL, broke a bone, pulled a hamstring, sprained an ankle, etc. These prevalent injuries are sure to require some form of physical therapy for a full recovery. According to the NCAA, “The overall injury rate in NCAA football is 8.1 injuries per 1,000 athlete exposures (games and practices combined).” This is in just football alone!

Although sports injuries often occur during the game or in practice, many injuries can occur in the everyday jog, sprint, or workout. Fox New reported the “Top 10 Sports Injuries” prevalent in the world. Here are the top five:

 

  1. Runner’s Knee: Experts say that this injury occurs when an individual runs for long periods of time, improperly. The impact between “tight” joints, muscles and ligaments in the leg to a hard surface can especially harm the knees and ankles overtime. Johns Hopkins Medicine illustrated the symptoms of this injury as “pain in and around the kneecap that happens when you are active...” and “rubbing, grinding, or clicking sound of the kneecap that you hear when you bend and straighten your knee…”

  2. “Shoulder Injury”: Performing regular intense motions during a particular sport can increase the risk of a shoulder injury. These motions could include throwing a football or baseball, for example. Dr. David Geier, sports medicine specialist, posted that “shoulder injuries represented 27.8% of all disabled days in professional baseball players. Pitchers experienced a 34% higher incidence injury rate compared with fielders in Major League Baseball.” Symptoms of a shoulder injury can include “stiffness” and pain when putting it in motion to perform a normal task.

  3. Sprained Ankle: It doesn’t take much to sprain an ankle. This can occur in professional sports, but it can also happen within the everyday activities. For example, walking down the stairs in an awkward way, or tripping over something can cause a sprained ankle. Sometimes a sprain is minor enough that it will heal over a period of a week or so, while more serious instances of a sprain require ice and therapy to strengthen it once again. Symptoms of a sprain can range from “tenderness” to severe bruising and “restricted range of motion.”

  4. “Tennis or Golf Elbow”: Statistics imply that “1% to 3% of the population” are affected in some way by this injury. Surprisingly, tennis and golf are not exclusive in causing this injury. The Cleveland Clinic reported that working in the garden or outside, and “vacuuming” and “sweeping” inside the house can cause tennis elbow. Symptoms include a development of pain when moving other parts of the arm when carrying out regular exercises and tasks.

  5. Pulled Muscle: This injury is highly common in sports, but like a sprained ankle and other injuries, it can occur in the everyday tasks. When muscles are stiff and tight during movement, especially intense movement, it is easier for them to tear. Symptoms of this injury include pain, “soreness”, cramping, and “limited range of movement.”


 

Cognitive Injuries


transparent sculpture of the human skull

STATISTICS SHOW THAT "1.5 MILLION AMERICANS SUFFER FROM TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES."


Whether it is because of a sport or a malfunction within the body, physical therapy can be the path to recovery and a bright future. Injury in the brain is a perfect example of another dimension of reach in this form of therapy.

How can physical therapy help injuries in the brain?


Movement in the body is highly influenced by signals from the brain. A parent teaching a child to eat with a fork and a spoon is a perfect example of helping to train the brain in a certain function. When a patient is hit with a stroke or a disease that negatively influences brain behavior, physical therapists help retrain the brain through physical movement.

What brain injuries require physical therapy?


Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, strokes, and concussions can all be aided by physical therapy. Some of these injuries are also affected by other systems in the body such as the circulatory system. Physical therapists can also help facilitate movement in a way addresses the issues in both systems, while preventing future injury.

 

Immune Injuries


Physical therapy can reach an attacked immune system.


According to the AARDA (American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association), “Approximately 50 million Americans, 20 percent of the population or one in five people, suffer from autoimmune diseases.” As explained in the previous section, many times body systems play dual roles in affecting an individual’s health. Therefore, orthopedic and neurological injury can be an illustration of an autoimmune injury. For example, the autoimmune disease Lupus causes pain and tenderness in the joints. While an individual could assume that the weakness of their joints was caused by certain movements completed in an intense activity, it could be a symptom of another cause.

What would physical therapists do to help these injuries?


In the case of an autoimmune injury, physical therapists would create a diet plan and incorporate pool exercises that would give the least strain on the joints. Diet and exercise is crucial in recovering from most injuries, especially from immune injuries.

Training particular movements in water have also been applied to orthopedic and cardiovascular injuries. Experts have found a positive impact of “aqua therapy” on patients dealing with an autoimmune disease or other injury:

For many years, warm water pool therapy has been a staple of rehabilitation medicine because of its numerous health benefits...The use of...hydrotherapy historically has been a popular treatment for many conditions and has been used in many cultures and civilizations... today the modern forms of hydrotherapy include...aqua therapy for rehabilitative purposes. The latter application gained momentum from its predecessor, hydro-gymnastics, which became important for the treatment of post-polio patients.


Physical therapists can do a lot when it comes to helping patients with this type of injury. Although some autoimmune diseases cannot be merely solved, proper diet and training can help a patient cope with their situation in a way where they can live their lives more fully.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

How Working Out Can Cure Unwanted Stress

 

Everyone experiences stress.

Whether work related, family life, school, or something else, we are often told that stress is a normal part of life. And it is, to a certain extent, although too much stress is never a good thing.

Seven out of ten Americans adults report experiencing high levels of stress every day, and more people are reporting negative physical responses to stress than ever before.

Recently, the American Institute of Stress recently released a list of over 50 ways that stress can manifest itself, affecting different parts of the body and mind in various ways.

Sometimes stress acts as the motivation that you need to finish a task for work or school, and it can give you the extra push that you need to succeed. When experienced in the right amounts, stress can even improve memory and has other health implications.

 

BUT WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THAT CONSTANT LEVEL OF STRESS SUDDENLY GOES FROM MANAGEABLE TO MAKING YOU INCAPABLE OF FUNCTIONING? 

 

You begin to feel as if you’ll never feel relaxed ever again, and you may not even remember what it feels like to have a functional life with normal worries. So how can you relieve the unwanted pressure and better manage your stress?

Most people will give you a list of practices that include a compilation of the following suggestions: improve sleep and diet, meditate, participate in breathing exercises, listen to soothing music, try some natural remedies, and others. However, while each of these methods might help in stress relief, there is a more effective strategy that we offer.

 

Here's our one-word suggestion: Exercise.


It seems as if there is no end to the benefits that come from working out. On top of improving health and assisting with weight loss, regular exercise can increase energy, and improve memory, relaxation, and sleep!

Here’s how:

When you are stressed, the body increases the amount of stress hormones released. One of these hormones, called cortisol, is what triggers the brain and body to go into ‘survival mode.’

Survival Mode


There are a lot of changes that occur very quickly when the brain goes into this mode. First, the body adjusts blood sugar, metabolism, immune response and even more in order to best prepare you for  ‘fight or flight.’

Then, everything in the body begins to run faster, which can be damaging to your body unless you are in an actual life-threatening situation.

Cortisol


Here’s one of the major ways that working out can relieve stress. Cortisol is also released when you exercise and put physical stress on the body. Your body only produces a limited supply of cortisol at any given time, so the more cortisol is released when you’re working out, the less it can release when you’re under pressure at work, school, or home.

The more frequently you exercise, the more the body grows accustomed to managing hormone levels and dealing with stress.

Endorphins


Another major aspect of working out as stress management tactic has everything to do with endorphins. Endorphins are the body’s natural painkillers or ‘feel good’ hormones that are released when you work out, creating the sensation that is commonly referred to as a “runner’s high,” or feeling of elation that you experience after you finish a workout, run, or physical activity.

Working out also engages the mind, forcing you to concentrate deeply on the task at hand instead of getting distracted by worries or stressors.

Concentrating on your movement also allows you to feel more calm, gain increased clarity, and have an improved mood.

Proper form when exercising requires you to  focus on your breathing and time yourself with a sense of rhythm, which is another aspect of working out that will assist you to better manage your stress.

So whether it’s yoga, weight lifting, running or playing sports, engaging in frequent physical activity greatly improves your ability to handle stress.

 

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

How to Modify Your Workouts to Reduce the Chance of Injury

 

If you are at all familiar with working out, then you are also familiar with what comes after...days of being sore and tense, especially if you’re new to working out or don’t know exactly what you’re doing.

Fitness injuries can be some of the most frustrating experiences; they limit not only what you are able to accomplish in the gym but, if you’re not careful, can also leave a lasting effect on day-to-day activities.

According to WebMD, the most common workout injuries include the following:

  • Pulled muscle

  • Strained muscle

  • Sprained ankle

  • Shoulder injury

  • Knee injury

  • Shin splint

  • Tendinitis

  • Wrist sprain

  • Wrist dislocation


 

However, these and other injuries can be avoided if you learn the proper ways to workout. You want your workout to help you get stronger and be healthy, not hurt you and bring you down. But what can you do to better prepare your mind and body for the most effective workout, without having to risk getting injured in the process? We have just the trick.

Here are the best ways to modify your workouts to reduce your chance of getting injured:

 

Warm Up Before Working Out


Make sure the muscles are prepared for the exercises you’ll be doing. Spend some time warming up to improve circulation and prepare the muscles for the ranges of motion you’ll be performing during specific workouts. Warm muscles perform effectively, and will greatly reduce the chances of getting injured during a workout.

There are several different ways to warm up, including but not limited to: biking, running, jumping rope or using a row machine.

Also be sure to add some stretching and some post-workout cool-down exercises to further decrease the risk of injury.

 

Stay Hydrated


Not having enough water is one of the most dangerous choices to make when exercising. Staying hydrated allows the joints and muscles to work better.

Also, when you’re exercising, your body naturally heats up, and water works to help keep the body cool. Staying hydrated allows the body to stay away from overheating or over-exhaustion, which have major side effects.

 

Learn Proper Form


Be sure that you know the proper form of any exercise you plan to perform. Doing a work out incorrectly is one of the main reasons why so many people get injured while exercising.

Not only will using the correct form help you avoid injury and stay as healthy and active as possible, but it also increases the good properties of each exercise such as proper breathing habits, learning to reduce wasted energy, etc.

 

Limit Your Weight


Another absolutely crucial aspect of working out is staying within your limits. If you can only healthily lift 20 lbs when working out a certain muscle group, be okay with that. If you push too far too fast, it will cause an injury.

As you gradually work out and train, the body is able to reach higher weights in time. Just don’t get so impatient that you try to hit those higher weights now, because you will likely injure yourself.

Many prominent athletes and trainers have fallen victim to major injury because they attempted to lift a weight level that they weren’t ready for. Don’t let that happen to you, too!

 

Adjust Your Workout


If you do the same exercises day after day, you might be at risk of overusing certain muscles and putting unnecessary pressure on them. Overuse injuries are a thing, and you definitely don’t want one.

So instead of repeating the same workout every time you go to the gym, try something new! Try a new machine, work out a new muscle group, or learn a new approach to your normal workout. You’ll avoid overuse injuries and experience a new level of fitness!

 

Know When to Stop


Lastly, you need to be aware of your own limits and what your body can and cannot handle. Know when to stop yourself, even if you’re not completely done with a workout. You want to stay fit and healthy...pushing past the breaking point will not help you accomplish either of those things.

 

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.