Health Benefits of Pumpkin by Your Marque Team

Fall is here - which also means pumpkin season! But there's more to pumpkins than pie- pumpkins offer many health benefits! Both fresh and canned pumpkin are packed with so many healthy nutrients.  Here are some reasons why incorporating more pumpkin into your diet might be a wise and healthful idea:

  • Pumpkins are that delicious orange color because of beta-carotene, which is an antioxidant that turns into vitamin A in the body. Beta-carotene is essential for healthy eyes and has also been linked to preventing coronary artery disease.

  • Pumpkin seeds are so nutritious! They're packed with protein, magnesium, zinc, iron, and potassium. Studies show that these seeds aid in blocking the enlargement of the prostate gland, lowering the risk of bladder stones, lowering cholesterol and lowering high blood pressure. They may even prevent some types of cancers due to the prominent levels of phytosterols (a group of compounds found in plants).




  • Eating pumpkin may aid in weight loss. Pumpkins and their seeds are low in calories and a high source of fiber, which keeps you full longer. Feeling full longer means beating those cravings and lessening the desire to snack too much. Eating a high-fiber diet boosts the metabolism, also aiding in weight loss.

  • Consuming pumpkin improves your complexion. Pumpkin contains lots of fruit enzymes and AHAs, which increase cell turnover, helping to brighten and smooth skin. It also contains antioxidants, which boosts collagen production and prevents wrinkles.

  • Eating pumpkin helps you sleep sounder! Pumpkin seeds contain tryptophan, the amino acid that contributes to that post-Thanksgiving dinner grogginess. Tryptophan makes you sleepy, but also helps the body produce serotonin, which is a calming neurotransmitter.


Try incorporating more pumpkin into your diet in a healthy way, like roasting cubes of it or sprinkling the seeds on top of your salad or morning yogurt parfait. Pumpkin is so versatile; the possibilities are endless! Have a happy and healthy pumpkin season!

References: https://www.curejoy.com/content/health-benefits-of-pumpkin/, https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/6-surprising-health-benefits-of-pumpkin#1, https://dailyburn.com/life/health/pumpkin-health-benefits/

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Is Your Preschooler Ready for Kindergarten? By Colleen Kraft, M.D.

Your child's social, emotional, academic and behavior skills are equally critical to school success, and too many U.S. children start kindergarten without them.

What does "school readiness" mean?

The idea that some children are "ready for school" by 4 or 5 and others are not is controversial. Just as children begin to walk or talk at different ages, they also develop the psychological and social skills needed for school at varying ages.

When you're deciding when your child should start kindergarten:

  • Look carefully at your child's development. Is your child able to communicate? How are his listening and social skills? Would he be able to get along with other children and adults? Is he toilet trained? What about physical skills like running, playing, or using a crayon or pencil?  

  • TA word about kindergarten screenings or readiness testing:


Some schools may conduct their own tests to evaluate your child's abilities. So-called "readiness tests" tend to look mostly at academic skills, but may evaluate other aspects of development, too. The tests are far from perfect; some children who do poorly on them do just fine in school.

So, if the test or screening identifies some areas where your child seems to lag behind, use the information to help you and the school plan for the special attention he may need in the year of kindergarten ahead.

You are your child's best advocate. By sharing information with your child's teacher and other school staff, you can help them be ready for your child. At the same time, you are establishing a partnership for your child's education that can and should continue throughout her childhood.

School readiness milestones

Important development milestones that help school go smoothly for children include:

Sensory development―the ability to use touch, sight, and hearing to explore and figure out the world around them.

Social, emotional, and behavioral development―such as being able to:

  • focus and pay attention

  • control impulses and emotions

  • take turns

  • cooperate and follow directions

  • make friends

  • empathize with others

  • control and communicate emotions

  • limit aggressive behaviors


Early language, literacy, and math skills― such as being able to talk, listen, and understand concepts like sound-letter associations, numbers, shapes, and how objects are related to each other.

How to promote school readiness:

Let Your Children See You Reading

If your children see you reading regularly, there is a good chance that they will follow your lead and sit down with a book themselves. Set aside some time to talk with them about what each of you is reading. If you have been regularly reading aloud to your children, by school age they'll probably want to read aloud to you, too!

Talk About Your Day

Find time to talk with your children about your respective days—in­cluding what they did at school. Even on a night when you are particularly busy, you should still be able to find a time and place to talk. This gives your children a chance to re-teach you what they learned that day.

Encourage Art & Writing

It is great for children to write and/or draw without any ed­ucational purpose in mind other than to express themselves. For example, you can encourage your children to write original stories, cards, letters, and invitations to friends and relatives. Keep paper, pencils, crayons, markers, and tape in a convenient lo­cation so your children can sit down and use them easily. Research has shown that writing improves a child's reading skills—and vice versa.

Plan One-on-One Time with your child

Plan some activities that you can do with your child—such as an art project. Keep phone call interruptions and media use to a minimum during this special time. Make it a time you are spending with each other. Some children say they wish they could call their parents on the phone, because a phone call or mobile device always gets first priority.

"Educational" Apps: Use with caution

Even though tablets, computer games, and apps are advertised as "educational," the truth is most of them have not been tested to show that children actually learn from them. They teach very basic skills, so don't assume an "interactive" game will be a good learning experience. Children learn better through creative playtime—where their brain takes the lead, not the app or computer game.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

Navigating Around Holiday Food Healthfully by Your Marque Team

Honey baked ham, gravy, pumpkin pie and cookies are just a few reasons why we look forward to the holidays. What we don’t look forward to is getting on the scale after the season is over. It’s hard to not overindulge, but there are ways you can stay both full and healthy without packing on the pounds. Here are 10 quick tips to help keep your health on the right track this season:


Be realistic. Don’t try to lose pounds during the holidays, just try to maintain your current weight.  Drink lots of water and remember you’ve eaten well the past 11 months so December should not ruin nearly a year of hard work.


Plan time for exercise. Exercise helps relieve holiday stress and prevents weight gain. A daily exercise routine can help offset increased holiday eating. The best way to hold yourself accountable to exercise is by grabbing a friend! Plan 30 minute daily walks, go to the gym or try a fun workout class like barre or spin.


Don’t skip meals. Before leaving for a party, eat a light snack like raw vegetables or a piece of fruit to curb your appetite. You will be less tempted to overindulge. Eating a handful of nuts will keep your belly feeling somewhat full so you won’t overeat when it’s time for dinner due to its protein.


Check out the party buffets before filling your plate. Choose only your favorite foods and skip the rest because you don’t need them. Also, include vegetables and fruits to keep your meal balanced. Try to eat things with vitamins and proteins since they’ll keep you feeling full longer. The carbs will bloat you and you’ll feel hungry again in an hour.


Eat until you are satisfied, but not stuffed. Savor your favorite holiday treats while eating smaller portions. Sit down, get comfortable, and enjoy.


Be careful with drinks. Alcohol can compromise your willpower and induce overindulging.  Additionally, be aware that non-alcoholic beverages can also be full of calories and sugar.


If you overeat at one meal, go light on the next one. It takes 500 calories per day (or 3,500 calories per week) above your normal consumption to gain one pound. But remember that it is impossible to gain weight from a single piece of pie, so you can relax and enjoy a slice.


Take the emphasis off food. Turn candy and cookie making time into non-edible projects like making wreaths or decorate a gingerbread house. Plan group activities with family and friends that are not centered around food. Try serving a holiday meal to the community, playing games, or take your family on a walk one evening to see the Christmas lights and decorations on your block.


Bring your own healthy dish to a holiday gathering. That’s an easy way to have one super food on your plate. At least you’ll know every ingredient that is in it!


Practice healthy holiday cooking. Preparing favorite dishes which are lower in fat and calories will help encourage healthy holiday eating. Integrate some of these simple-cooking tips in traditional holiday recipes to make them healthier:




  • Stuffing- Use a little less bread and add more onions, garlic, celery, and vegetables. I like to add green apples to mine. Moisten or flavor with low-fat low-sodium chicken Eggnog-hcor vegetable broth and applesauce.

  • Turkey- Enjoy delicious, roasted turkey breast without the skin and save 11 grams of saturated fat per 3 oz. serving.

  • Green Bean Casserole- Cook fresh green beans with chunks of potatoes instead of cream soup. Top with crushed almonds instead of using the traditional fried onion rings.

  • Mashed Potatoes- Use skim milk and fresh garlic. You can add a little bit of chopped onions and parsley for a little more flavor

  • Eggnog- Four bananas, 1-1/2 cups skim milk or soymilk or even almond milk, 1-1/2 cups plain nonfat yogurt, 1/4 teaspoon rum extract, and ground nutmeg. Blend all ingredients except nutmeg. Puree until smooth.

  • Desserts- Make all your pies crust less. Substitute two egg whites for each whole egg in baked recipes. Replace heavy cream with evaporated skim milk in cheesecakes and cream pies. Top cakes with fresh fruit, fruit sauce, or a sprinkle of powdered sugar instead of fattening frosting.


Enjoying the holidays can be easy and fun with a little willpower. Try these helpful tips for the next few months and I am sure you will feel better about yourself. Keep things light and remember the little steps help you make the big ones when it comes to eating healthy. Have a happy holiday season and enjoy!



The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 


 

Health Benefits of Pumpkin by Lauren Mitchell

Fall is here - which also means pumpkin season! But there's more to pumpkins than pie- pumpkins offer many health benefits! Both fresh and canned pumpkin are packed with so many healthy nutrients.  Here are some reasons why incorporating more pumpkin into your diet might be a clever idea:

  • Pumpkins are that delicious orange color because of beta-carotene, which is an antioxidant that turns into vitamin A in the body. Beta-carotene is essential for healthy eyes and has also been linked to preventing coronary artery disease.


 

  • Pumpkin seeds are so nutritious! They're packed with protein, magnesium, zinc, iron, and potassium. Studies show that these seeds aid in blocking the enlargement of the prostate gland, lowering the risk of bladder stones, lowering cholesterol and lowering high blood pressure. They may even prevent some types of cancers due to the prominent levels of phytosterols (a group of compounds found in plants).




  • Eating pumpkin may aid in weight loss. Pumpkins and their seeds are low in calories and a high source of fiber, which keeps you full longer. Feeling full longer means beating those cravings and lessening the desire to snack too much. Eating a high-fiber diet boosts the metabolism, also aiding in weight loss.


 

  • Consuming pumpkin improves your complexion. Pumpkin contains lots of fruit enzymes and AHAs, which increase cell turnover, helping to brighten and smooth skin. It also contains antioxidants, which boosts collagen production and prevents wrinkles.


 

  • Eating pumpkin helps you sleep sounder! Pumpkin seeds contain tryptophan, the amino acid that contributes to that post-Thanksgiving dinner grogginess. Tryptophan makes you sleepy, but also helps the body produce serotonin, which is a calming neurotransmitter.


Try incorporating more pumpkin into your diet in a healthy way, like roasting cubes of it or sprinkling the seeds on top of your salad or morning yogurt parfait. Pumpkin is so versatile; the possibilities are endless! Have a happy and healthy pumpkin season!

References: https://www.curejoy.com/content/health-benefits-of-pumpkin/, https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/6-surprising-health-benefits-of-pumpkin#1, https://dailyburn.com/life/health/pumpkin-health-benefits/

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Seasonal Allergies in Children by Colleen Kraft, M.D.

Allergies often start in childhood and continue throughout life. Allergies are caused by the body’s reaction to substances called “allergens,” which trigger the immune system to react to harmless substances as though they were attacking the body. Although allergies can’t be cured, with proper care they can usually be kept under control.

When to Suspect an Allergy

Some allergies are easy to identify by the pattern of symptoms that follows exposure to a particular substance. But others are subtler, and may masquerade as other conditions. Here are some common clues that could lead you to suspect your child may have an allergy.

Repeated or chronic cold-like symptoms that last more than a week or two, or that develop at about the same time every year. These could include:

  • Runny nose

  • Nasal stuffiness

  • Sneezing

  • Throat clearing

  • Nose rubbing

  • Sniffling

  • Snorting

  • Sneezing

  • Itchy, runny eyes


Common Allergens in Home and School

In the fall, many indoor allergens cause problems for children because they are inside of home and school for longer periods.

  • Dust: contains dust mites and finely ground particles from other allergens, such as pollen, mold, and animal dander

  • Fungi: including molds too small to be seen with the naked eye

  • Furry animals: cats, dogs, guinea pigs, gerbils, rabbits, and other pets

  • Clothing and toys: made, trimmed, or stuffed with animal hair

  • Latex: household and school articles, such as rubber gloves, toys, balloons; elastic in socks, underwear, and other clothing; airborne particles

  • Bacterial enzymes: used to manufacture enzyme bleaches and cleaning products

  • Certain foods


Controlling Allergy Symptoms

  • It’s helpful to use air conditioners, where possible, to reduce exposure to pollen in both your home and your car.

  • Molds are present in the spring and late summer, particularly around areas of decaying vegetation. Children with mold allergies should avoid playing in piles of dead leaves in the fall.

  • Dust mites congregate in places where food for them (e.g , flakes of human skin) is plentiful. That means they are most commonly found in upholstered furniture, bedding, and rugs.

  • Padded furnishings, such as mattresses, box springs, pillows, and cushions should be encased in allergen-proof, zip-up covers, which are available through catalogs and specialized retailers.

  • Wash linens weekly, and other bedding such as blankets, every 2 to 3 weeks in hot water to kill the dust mite.

  • Pillows should be replaced every 2 to 3 years.


Although there are many over-the-counter antihistamines, decongestants, and nasal sprays, it is very important that you work with your child’s doctor over the years to make sure that your child’s allergy and asthma are correctly diagnosed and the symptoms properly treated.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

Heat Stroke by Your Marque Team

Heat stroke is caused by your body overheating. It usually is a result of prolonged exposure to hot temperatures. Heatstroke can occur if your body temperature rises to 104 F or higher. It is very common in the summer.

Causes:

  • Exposure to a hot environment. Being in a hot environment leads to a rise in core body temperature. This typically occurs after exposure to hot, humid weather, especially for prolonged periods of time.

  • Strenuous activity can cause increase in core body temperature in hot weather. This is most likely to occur if you're not used to hot temperatures.

  • Wearing extra or excessive clothing prevents sweat from evaporating easily and cooling your body.

  • Drinking alcohol can affect your body's ability to regulate your temperature

  • Becoming dehydrated is a result of not drinking enough water to replenish fluids lost through sweating.


Symptoms:

  • High body temperature

  • Altered mental state or behavior

  • Alteration in sweating

  • Nausea and vomiting

  • Flushed skin

  • Rapid breathing

  • Racing heart rate

  • Headache


Prevention:

  • Wear loose fitting, lightweight clothing so it allows your body to cool properly.

  • Protect against sunburn by applying a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Sunburn affects your body's ability to cool itself down.

  • Drink plenty of water to help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature.

  • Take it easy during the hottest parts of the day. Drink fluids and rest frequently in a cool spot.


 

If you think a person may be experiencing heatstroke, seek immediate medical help or Call 911.

Take immediate action while waiting for emergency treatment:

  • Get the person into shade or indoors.

  • Remove excess clothing.

  • Cool with whatever means available:



    • cool tub of water or a cool shower

    • fan while misting with water

    • use ice packs

    • place wet towels on the person's head, neck, armpits and groin




The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

Sunburns by Janell Pierce

Summer is here and there’s no avoiding the sun or any kind of exposure to ultraviolet light. Overexposure of either one can cause skin irritation or damage. This could lead to sunburns which are common here in Southern California throughout the summer. Exposure to both types of radiation can increase the risk of several conditions such as:

  • Wrinkles

  • Dark Spots

  • Skin Cancer


Sunburns are caused by ultraviolet radiation, either from the sun or from artificial sources, such as tanning. This damage is mainly the formation of a thymine dimer. When the body recognizes this damage, it triggers several defense mechanisms, including DNA repair to reverse the damage, peeling to remove irreparably damaged skin cells, and increased melanin production to prevent future damage. Melanin acts as a skin protector and automatically absorbs ultraviolet wavelength light. Melanin inhibits both the direct alteration of DNA and indirect DNA damage, preventing ultraviolet photons from disrupting chemical bonds. Skin type usually determines the ease of a sunburn. People with lighter skin tones have a greater risk of sunburn. Age can also affect how skin reacts to sun. Children younger than six and adults older than sixty are more sensitive to sunlight.

The most effective way to prevent sunburn is to reduce the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the skin. Some recommendations include:

  • Seeking shade

  • Avoiding peak exposure (between the hours of 10 am – 4pm)

  • Wear protective clothing / sunglasses and hats

  • Use sunscreen


Sunscreens or sunblocks are the most common preventatives that block ultraviolet light. They have a SPF rating which indicates the sunblock's ability to suppress sunburn. The higher the SPF rating, the lower the amount of direct skin damage. Broad-spectrum sunscreens contain filters that protect against ultraviolet radiation. The best sunscreen protection is achieved by applying 15 to 30 minutes before exposure, followed by one reapplication 15 to 30 minutes after exposure begins. Further reapplication is necessary only after activities such as:

  • Swimming

  • Sweating

  • Rubbing


This can vary based on the kind of sunscreen being used.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Asthma by Your Marque Team

Asthma is a long-term disease which affects the airways of the lungs. Asthma is categorized as an inflammatory disease because the airways narrow with swelling- producing phlegm in the bronchial tubes making it difficult to breathe. Asthma can range from minor to severe where it begins to interfere with daily activities

Asthma can affect any age group, but it's primarily found in children. Asthma is common in children for many reasons. Premature birth or low birth weight can lead to asthma since the lungs are not fully developed which makes it easier for the airways to become obstructed. Children with environmental allergies have a high risk of developing asthma because it causes runny noses therefore producing mucus that begins to build up in the lining of the bronchial tubes. Children who are diagnosed frequently with respiratory infections also become prone to the disease.

The symptoms for asthma vary on the severity of the disease; not every person with asthma will have all the symptoms. The most common symptoms are coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness pain, or pressure. A person with minor asthma can just be affected with a persistent cough due to mucus build up.  A person with a severe case of asthma will generally have chest pains due to shortness breath, along with wheezing caused by the narrowing of the airway.  Some people may go long periods of time without symptoms and then have a sudden asthma attack.  For others, some may have symptoms every day, only experience asthma symptoms during physical activity or have been diagnosed with a viral infection.



There are many ways to prevent asthma.  It's important to identify what triggers the flare ups. Triggers can aggravate the bronchial tubes leading to the beginning of symptoms. Some triggers for people with asthma are air pollution, allergies, cold air, a cold or flu virus, pets, sinusitis, smoke, and fragrances. Although it may not be possible to avoid all these triggers, doctors may prescribe a preventive inhaler known as Flovent, which helps prevent the bronchial tubes from becoming inflamed.

Although there is no cure for asthma, there is a wide range of treatment from holistic care to prescribed medication. There is treatment for short-term relief and long-term control; both types can be controlled with the use of inhalers. Use of inhalers is the most common way for the steroid medication to reach the lungs. Some inhalers may only carry one medication while others carry two (depending on the severity). A common way of treatment for children and elders is the use of a nebulizer that produces a mist that's inhaled; the same medication is used for both methods. For people with severe asthma, doctors may prescribe Prednisone which is a steroid used as a bronchodilator.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.