Depression by Your Marque Team



“Sadness is an emotion, whereas depression is an illness,” says Dr. Ken Robbins.

What is depression?

Depression is a mood disorder that’s characterized by a persistent low mood, lethargy, and feelings of worthlessness. It interferes with concentration, motivation, and everyday activities. Not only does it affect a person’s mood but the entire body; it weakens the immune system, increases susceptibility to viral infections, and even cancer. According to Dr. George Krucik, out of the 7 billion people worldwide, there was an estimated 121 million people that have some form of depression, but less than 25 percent have access to treatment.

There are various types of depression. If the depression is related to bereavement, it’s called complicated bereavement. Unipolar depression is when depressed mood is the predominant feature. Bipolar, also known as manic depression, is when there are both manic and depressive episodes that are associated with periods of normal mood. The last type of depression is called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is related to the reduced daylight in the winter. With SAD, the depression only occurs during the winter time and the mood lifts for the remaining of the year.

Who can get it?

The cause of depression can be a factor of numerous reasons. For some, it’s genetic, so for people that have had or have someone in their family with depression, they have a higher chance of having depression as well. Another reason could be from past physical, sexual, or emotional abuse that one has experienced that can cause depression. The death or a loss of a loved one, even if it was natural, can increase one’s risk of depression. Another related cause is substance abuse. According to National Alliance on Mental Illness, they found approximately 30 percent of people with substance abuse have developed depression.

What are the symptoms?

When it comes to depression, it affects a person psychologically, physically, and socially. Psychologically, there are feelings of persistent sadness, hopelessness and helplessness, low self-esteem, feeling irritable and intolerant of others, lacking motivation, anxiousness, and/or suicidal thoughts. Some might feel guilt-ridden or have difficulty making decisions on their own.

Physically, for someone who suffers from depression, their moving or speaking is slower than usual, drastic chances in appetite and/or weight, unexplained aches and pain, and insomnia.

Socially, one would take part in fewer social activities, neglecting hobbies and interests, and difficulty at work and in school.

How is depression treated?

One of the key factors when it comes to getting treatment for depression is support from friends or family. The ones suffering from depression need to know they’re not alone. Along with the support, psychotherapy is recommended for mild cases of depression.

In moderate to severe depression, antidepressants can be used along with psychotherapy. Some of the classes of antidepressants are Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs), Tricyclic antidepressants, atypical antidepressants, and Selective Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs).

In addition to psychotherapy and/or antidepressants, aerobic exercise helps with mild cases of depression because it raises the levels of endorphins and it stimulates the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which is associated with a person’s mood.

How can I prevent it?

There isn’t a way to prevent depression, but there are ways to minimize the effects of depression and to be aware of a loved one suffering from depression.

To help minimize the effects of depression, find a way to control stress. It will help increase resilience and boost one’s self-esteem. Another way is to reach out to your loved ones in times of crisis. Going through hardship alone is difficult, but with the help of friends and family, one will be able to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

There are a number of warning signs of loved ones suffering from depression. The blank stares, loss of interest, and/or inability to express happiness for more than a few weeks is a start. Sometimes crying may or may not be an obvious trigger, but looking out for tearful eyes, furrowed eyebrows, slumped posture, and lack of eye contact and/or facial expression can be helpful indicators of depression. The more obvious signs are when he/she is fixated on past mistakes expressing guilt and/or self-blame. You want to listen for statements such as “it’s hopeless,” “I have no choice,” “nobody cares.” In some cases, one might express thoughts of suicide. Listen for “you’d be better off without me,” “I can’t go on,” “I wish it were over.” If a loved one expresses thoughts of suicide, encourage them to talk about it because it helps lower the risk of following through with it, but more importantly, listen to what they have to say.

“Depression is not a bad mood. It is a biological reality and a medical condition, and when we talk about it as anything less than that, we belittle the people suffering from it.” -Cate Matthews, The Huffington Post

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

The Pelvic Floor: What You Need To Know

 

What is the pelvic floor?


The pelvic floor is one of the most crucial support systems you have in your body. Think of it as a strong security system that helps your body know who to keep in and who to kick out.  In more scientifically defined terms, the “Pelvic floor muscles are the layer of muscles that support the pelvic organs and span the bottom of the pelvis. The pelvic organs are the bladder and bowel in men, and bladder, bowel and uterus in women.” Because of the pelvic floor, the most vital functions of an individual’s body can be properly performed.

Why is the pelvic floor important?


One of the most vital functions of the pelvic floor is to support the pelvic organs. The strength of muscle determines the strength in the facilitation of the pelvic organs in their functions. Furthermore, if the muscle is weak, it is more difficult for the organs to perform properly.

In order to better illustrate the importance of the pelvic floor, one must understand the organs that these muscles support. Below are the functions of the pelvic organs in relation to the pelvic floor.

The Sexual Function


The sexual function of both men and women demands a proper relationship between the pelvic organs and the pelvic floor. The Continence Foundation of Australia defines the importance of this relationship in the following way, “Pelvic floor muscles are...important for sexual function in both men and women. In men, it is important for erectile function and ejaculation. In women, voluntary contractions (squeezing) of the pelvic floor contribute to sexual sensation and arousal. The pelvic floor muscles in women also provide support for the baby during pregnancy and assist in the birthing process.” This defined relationship, furthermore, illustrates the vitality of the strength in the pelvic floor. It is more difficult and more painful for an individual’s body to properly perform these sexual functions with a weak pelvic floor.



Releasing Waste In The Body


Passing waste through the bladder and bowels requires proper shifts between contracting and relaxing, similar to the sexual function. Contraction in the pelvic floor secures the organs in their place. This prevents the passage of waste from being released constantly. Relaxation, on the other hand, provides a release of urine and bowels. If the pelvic floor is strong, there will be a proper balance between the processes of contraction and relaxation. If the pelvic floor is weak, however, there will be less contraction and more release. This will result in irregular leaks from the bladder and bowels.


 

What weakens the pelvic floor?


In general, an individual’s age and weight can affect the strength of their pelvic floor. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) statistics concerning women, “Underweight and normal weight women were less likely to have a pelvic floor disorder (15.1 percent) than were overweight women (26.3 percent) and obese women (30.4 percent).” It has also been proven that pelvic floor disorders are more prevalent as an individual gets older, particularly for women. This can be due to how pregnancy and childbirth affect the women throughout their life. Lifting heavier when exercising, for men and women, has also been shown to loosen pelvic floor muscles. Click here for more causes of weakness within the pelvic floor.

 

How to strengthen the pelvic floor?


An individual can always strengthen their pelvic floor through particular exercises. In fact, it is highly recommended to continue to strengthen the pelvic floor throughout one’s life in order to prevent an imbalance of the contraction and relaxation processes in the body. These exercises will vary between men and women. Click here for the proper exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor. These exercises include illustrations and videos on how to perform them properly.




 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

3 Best Practices After Physical Therapy

 

So you finally finished physical therapy!

Congratulations! You are now well on your way back towards a healthy, active, pain-free lifestyle.

But you aren’t out of the woods quite yet.

Most people end up seeing a physical therapist due to an injury, surgery, or because of little injuries or trauma that have gotten worse over the years. Whether you were doing too much exercise, not enough exercise, exercising with poor form, or even just faulty everyday movements, it ended up causing enough pain or discomfort that you went to your trusted physical therapist to get the issues resolved. Now that the issues are resolved, the last thing you want to do is re-injure or aggravate an injury by resorting back to old habits.

Here are the best 3 ways that you can avoid returning to your physical therapist’s office:

1) Continue to Exercise with Good Form


If you have some extra hundred dollar bills lying around and can afford a personal trainer, great! They are well worth the investment and will help you perfect your form, correct muscle imbalances, and improve strength.

However, most of us just don’t have that kind of spare cash. Take the time to research good form for your exercises and remember what your physical therapist instructed. Follow the timeline exactly and don’t do certain exercises before the recommended date. Sometimes more is less but don’t get caught doing nothing. Your muscles will atrophy, and you’ll likely end up in a worse place than you were before.

2) Stretch


Stretching is an often-overlooked aspect of health and wellness. Nutrition and exercise are often put upon a pedestal and stretching is only an afterthought.

Yet there are many benefits to stretching, including: increased flexibility, improved posture, increased nutrient absorption, and injury prevention (which is forgotten all too often).

Injury prevention may be the most important aspect of stretching—especially for someone who just finished physical therapy. According to UC Davis, stretching helps prevent injury because when your muscles are warm and stretched, your movements become easier and more fluid—thus preventing injury.

When you don’t stretch, your muscles become tight and there is an increased chance that you’ll tear or pull a muscle. But it will also cause muscle imbalances that will take you straight back to your physical therapist.

3) Practice What Your Physical Therapist Taught You


By far the most important thing you can do post-physical therapy is just to practice what your physical therapist taught you. During your visits, he or she should have given you different exercises and stretches to practice at home and then shown you how to execute these movements correctly.

Do them! You will recover faster and more completely by doing the “homework” your physical therapist has assigned you. Follow the timeline that your physical therapist has laid out for you and don’t push yourself too hard too soon.

Do not take the easy route and get lazy thinking you’ll be fine now that your sessions are over. You’ll undoubtedly regret it in the long run. Make sure you schedule time to complete your exercises, stretch, and follow the exact recovery timeline that your physical therapist gave you.




 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Injury Depression? What You NEED to Know

 

Whether you are a competitive athlete or a weekend warrior, injuries happen. We have all experienced some small injuries from being active. We get sore, get scratched and maybe even some bruises. We will take it easy for a day and maybe get some simple rehab to recover faster. We will back at our favorite activities in no time, right?

But not all injuries are created equal.

Ever sprained an ankle? Torn an ACL? Torn your rotator cuff? Have you ever had an injury that has kept you from competing or playing the sport you love for a significant amount of time?

If so, then you’ll understand the despair, helplessness, frustration, and often anger that follows a serious or dramatic injury.

But if you haven’t, then those emotions can be difficult to understand and process.

 

Understanding the Emotions Following Injury


For most competitive athletes, their sport is their reason for being. It is their job. Their life.

For the rest of us, sports and other physical activities are an escape. We use them to relax, rejuvenate, and refresh ourselves. As we exercise our brain releases endorphins which makes us happy.

Now imagine you lost your reason for being. Or pretend that you lost your way to destress and relax. What emotions would you feel?

Frustration? Sadness? Anger? Apathy? No motivation? Lack of appetite?

It is important that you understand that these emotions are normal. Every athlete will respond to an injury differently. Some may not experience any negative emotions whatsoever.

However, you need to be concerned if these emotions worsen over time, seem excessive, or don’t get better.

Picabo Street, a world-class Olympic skier, experienced many of these excessive emotions. In a horrendous skiing crash, Street broke her left leg and blew out her right knee. A month later, Street had shut herself away in a bedroom in her parents’ house with the blinds closed and the doors locked.

She said of this experience:

“I went through a huge depression. I went all the way to rock bottom. I never thought that I ever would experience anything like that in my life…I think it was a combination of the atrophying of my legs, the new scars, and feeling like a caged animal. I went from being a very physical person, a very powerful athlete, to barely having any strength to get from my room to the kitchen. You're stuck and you can't do what you normally do and it makes you crazy.”



Street’s experience is more common than you might expect, so it’s imperative that you’re aware of the signs and symptoms of injury-related depression. Some excessive emotions/actions include:

1) Moderate to severe depression
2) Eating disorders
3) Substance abuse
4) Frequent bouts of rage
5) Alienation


 

How You Can Help


If you know an athlete that is suffering from some of these emotions, there are several things that you can do to help.

Support them. Let them know that you are there to help them through the tough times, through the rehab, and onto a full recovery. Often, it is the love, hope, and motivation of a loved one that will help pull them through.

Help them realize that their personal identity isn’t tied to that specific sport or activity. They have other admirable qualities and other important aspects of their life. Help them pick up another sport, hobby, or activity that they enjoy during the rehabilitation. Or if the injury is career ending, something that they can enjoy for the years to come.

These might include: family activities, golf, book clubs, weight lifting, or vlogging.

Finally, let your athlete know that it is okay to get professional help. Give them permission and empower them with all the resources possible for a speedy physical and mental recovery. A mental health or sports psychologist has experience dealing with these types of problems and will be able to provide the best care for your athlete.

Picabo Street said that once she started to focus on all the things that she is grateful for -- the good instead of the bad -- that she started to overcome her depression.

Whether you are an athlete overcoming post-injury depression or are trying to help a loved-one, recognize that post-injury depression isn’t something to be taken lightly. Please take the proper steps and seek out trained medical professionals to help you on your road to recovery, both mentally and physically.


 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Constantly Connected: The Effects of Media on Children & Teens by Colleen Kraft, M.D.

Today's children and teens are growing up immersed in digital media. They are exposed to media in all forms, including TV, computers, smartphones, and other screens.

Media can influence how children and teens feel, learn, think, and behave.

What We Know:

Here are facts about digital media use.

  • Almost 75% of teens own a smartphone. They can access the Internet, watch TV and videos, and download interactive applications (apps). Mobile apps allow photo-sharing, gaming, and video-chatting.

  • 25% of teens describe themselves as "constantly connected" to the Internet.

  • 76% of teens use at least one social media site. More than 70% of teens visit multiple social media sites, such as Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram.

  • 4 of 5 households (families) own a device used to play video games.


Why It's Good to Unplug:

Overuse of digital media and screens may place your child or teen at risk of

  • Obesity. Excessive screen use, as well as having a TV in the bedroom, can increase the risk of obesity. Teens who watch more than 5 hours of TV per day are 5 times more likely to be overweight than teens who watch 0 to 2 hours.

  • Sleep problems. Media use can interfere with sleep. Children and teens who spend more time with social media or who sleep with mobile devices in their rooms are at greater risk for sleep problems. Exposure to light (particularly blue light) and stimulating content from screens can delay or disrupt sleep, and have a negative effect on school.

  • Problematic internet use. Children who overuse online media can be at risk for problematic Internet use. There may be increased risks for depression at the high end of Internet use.

  • Negative effect on school performance. Children and teens often use entertainment media at the same time that they're doing other things, such as homework. Such multi-tasking can have a negative effect on school.

  • Risky behaviors. Teens' displays on social media often show risky behaviors, such as substance use, sexual behaviors, self-injury, or eating disorders. Exposure of teens through media to alcohol, tobacco use, or sexual behaviors is associated with earlier initiation of these behaviors.

  • Sexting and privacy and predators. Sexting is sending nude or semi-nude images as well as sexually explicit text messages using a cell phone. About 12% of youth age 10 to 19 years of age have sent a sexual photo to someone else. Teens need to know that once content is shared with others they may not be able to delete or remove it completely. They may also not know about or choose not to use privacy settings.

  • Cyberbullying. Children and teens online can be victims of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying can lead to short- and long-term negative social, academic, and health issues for both the bully and the target. Fortunately, programs to help prevent bullying may reduce cyberbullying.


Your Family Plan?

Children today are growing up in a time of highly personalized media use experiences, so parents must develop personalized media use plans for their children. Media plans should take into account each child's age, health, personality, and developmental stage. All children and teens need adequate sleep (8-12 hours, depending on age), physical activity (1 hour), and time away from media.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

How to Decrease Your Chances of Sports-Related Injuries and Illnesses by Pete Brundu

I’m sure you have heard of the term sports medicine while at a sporting event, watching your favorite football team, or mixed martial arts fighter on TV, but never really gave much thought about the importance of sports medicine to both professional and amateur athletes.

Sports Medicine is the practice of the diagnosis, treatment and preventative treatment of sports-related injuries and illness.  Any athlete who participates in any sport may at some point need professional and clinical treatment for a sport-related injury or illness.

Why should you consider advise or treatment from a sports medicine provider?  Whether you are training for the Olympics, your children are going to be the next soccer superstars, or you’re the weekend warrior CrossFit novice, injuries can and often happen.

Injury and illness risks are much more likely to occur from exercising without proper stretching, warm-up, and cool down techniques. Your provider can help you determine appropriate warm-up techniques, how long and the reason for them based upon your physical activity, intensity and duration. Your provider can help you prevent muscle strains by giving you a detailed plan of stretching and warm-up exercises to implement before your physical activity. In the event of an injury, your sports medicine doctor can offer orthopedic treatment or refer you to an orthopedic specialist in their group. Another option is physical therapy, depending on the extent of your injury, your provider might feel physical therapy is the proper treatment for you.

Sports medicine doctors will not only help with physical injuries, but also diet and nutrition.

Most of the larger, more established sports medicine organizations will have dieticians and nutritionists available.  As your activity level increases so does the demand your body has for a more proper diet and nutrition. With improper diet and nutrition, you might notice a loss of energy, weakness, lack of endurance and stamina due to dehydration, electrolyte imbalance or both. Your provider, after examining you and listening to your routines, exercise, training schedule and diet, can give you specialized advise to your diet and nutritive intake.  Additionally, they can order laboratory tests to have an accurate representation of what your various blood levels are to customize a more complete intake regiment.  These are ways to help you stay healthy and enable your body to be able to sustain peak performance when in demand.

Do you have to seek the advice of a sports medicine provider if you’re just starting out with an exercise routine? No, but at a minimum you should make an appointment to see your physician, let them know your plans to begin exercising. They can give you advise based on their examination of you and your physical condition about the best way to get started to prevent unnecessary injury and illness as well as keep track of your health and physical improvements.

Who knows? Maybe your simple exercise routine will turn into a passion and more intense workouts will follow.  If so, you already took the first step in preventing exercise injury and illness. Your next logical step in this progression is sports medicine. Congratulations on choosing a healthy lifestyle.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

 

Kids & Diet: Fat, Salt, and Sugar by Colleen Kraft, M.D.

Getting children to eat healthy, nutritious food can sometimes present challenges. It’s important for both children and adults to be sensible and enjoy all foods and beverages, but not to overdo it on any one type of food. Sweets and higher-fat snack foods in appropriate portions are OK in moderation.

Childhood is the best time to start heart healthy eating habits, but adult goals for cutting back on total fat, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol are not meant generally for children younger than 2 years.

Fat is an Essential Nutrient for Children

Fat supplies the energy, or calories, children need for growth and active play and should not be severely restricted.

Dangers of High Fat Intake

However, high fat intake—particularly a diet high in saturated fats—can cause health problems, including heart disease later in life. Saturated fats are usually solid at room temperatures and are found in fatty meats (such as beef, pork, ham, veal, and lamb) and many dairy products (whole milk, cheese, and ice cream). For that reason, after age 2 children should be served foods that are lower in fat and saturated fats.

Healthier, More Low-Fat, Low-Cholesterol Foods for Children Over Age 2:

  • Poultry

  • Fish

  • Lean meat (broiled, baked, or roasted; not fried)

  • Low-fat dairy products

  • Low-saturated fat oils from vegetables


 

The General Rule on Fats

As a general guideline, fats should make up less than 30% of the calories in your child’s diet, with no more than about one-third or fewer of those fat calories coming from saturated fat and the remainder from unsaturated (polyunsaturated or monounsaturated) fats. These include vegetable oils like corn, safflower, sunflower, soybean, and olive. Parents often find the information about various types of fat confusing. In general, oils and fats derived from animal origin are saturated. The simplest place to start is merely to reduce the amount of fatty foods of all types in your family’s diet.

Serve Children Foods Low in Salt

Table salt, or sodium chloride, may improve the taste of certain foods. However, researchers have found a relationship between dietary salt and high blood pressure in some individuals and population groups. High blood pressure afflicts about 25% of adult Americans and contributes to heart attacks and strokes.

Check Sodium Levels in Processed Foods

Processed foods often contain higher amounts of sodium. Check food labels for levels of sodium in:

  • Processed cheese

  • Instant puddings

  • Canned vegetables

  • Canned soups

  • Hot dogs

  • Salad dressings

  • Pickles

  • Certain breakfast cereals

  • Potato chips and other snacks


 

Sugar in Your Child's Diet: Go for Natural!

Caloric sweeteners range from simple sugars, like fructose and glucose, to common table sugar, molasses, honey, and high fructose corn syrup. Although the main use of sugar is as a sweetener, sugar has other uses. Sugars in foods, whether natural or added, provide calories—the fuel that supplies energy necessary for daily activities. And if given the choice, many children would probably request sugary foods and beverages for breakfast, lunch, and dinner—research shows that humans are naturally drawn to sweet tastes. Whole fruit is a great choice because it combines fiber and other nutrients along with a delicious snack!

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

 

 

How to Become an Intuitive Eater

 

Food. It is something we all need to live. Some constantly crave it, while some actively avoid it. According to the ANAD (The National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders), “At least 30 million people of all ages and genders suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S.” and “Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.” Within the polar habitual practices with food, many may wonder where the balance lies. The concept of Intuitive Eating has brought hope to finding the balance within the cravings to eat and to not eat.

In 1995, two dieticians, Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch, developed a model accompanied with 10 principles of eating and living. The purpose of these principles was to balance and increase health in an individual’s life. Evelyn Tribole illustrates the success of the 90 studies she and Resch have performed by saying,

“It’s thrilling to see all the research and gives me great hope. Intuitive Eating is a dynamic integration between mind and body. The principles work by either cultivating or removing obstacles to body awareness, a process known as interoceptive awareness. Essentially, Intuitive Eating is a personal process of honoring health by listening and responding to the direct messages of the body in order to meet your physical and psychological needs.”


With this in mind, Tribole is quick to point out that “Intuitive Eating is not a diet or food plan.” It is not about failing or passing, but about learning through the process. With this in mind, here are the 10 Principles of Intuitive Eating as defined in the Tribole and Research studies.

 

1) Reject the Diet Mentality


The first principle is fairly simple. If you haven’t already, get rid of the materials, articles, and media promoting you to a variety of diet plans. There is no fast, healthy way to remove weight as quickly as you would like. Therefore, the idea is to not only remove all your materials of diet planning, but also your thought process that diet planning will somehow magically help you lose a tremendous amount of weight and get fit in 2 weeks or even 2 months.

 

2) Honor Your Hunger


The second principle only begins to work when you have given up your mentality of dieting. When your body tells you that you’re hungry, eat. Although, that may sound strange or too simple at first, the biology of your body was created to notify you when it needs something. So, check the notification and fulfill it. It is as easy as that.


3) Make Peace with Food


The third principle is about stopping a mental war within yourself. Maybe for awhile you have told yourself that eating excessively is “bad” or that eating at all is preventing you from achieving what you want to achieve. This is where you need to be brave. It is time for you to mentally accept that it’s okay to eat, even if it is excessive at first. When your body has been wanting something for so long and has not received it when it needs it, it is normal for your body to eat more intensely than normal.

 

4) Challenge the Food Police


The fourth principle is mentally choosing to answer your hunger instead of the “Calories” and “Fat” Police forces. You have just “made peace” with food, so now you must rid yourself of anything that is currently still challenging your current position. Don’t let the Food Police guilt trip you back into your irrational dietary habits.

 

5) Respect Your Fullness


Principle number five is pretty transparent. Once you are full, you are full. When your body tells you you are hungry, eat. However, when it tells you to stop eating, stop eating.


6) Discover the Satisfaction Factor


Principle number six is taking the time to enjoy the eating experience. Eat what you actually are looking forward to eating, in a comfortable environment. Making the eating experience more pleasing can not only ease your mental health, but can improve your overall physical health.

 

7) Honor Your Feelings Without Using Food


Principle number seven is all about trying other ways to overcome your feelings of anxiety and depression without using food. Many times when people are anxious or depressed, they either increase or decrease food intake. Try to take food out of the picture in overcoming these challenges. Instead, go for a run, read a book, or listen to some of your favorite music. There are many ways to cope with challenges you face without involving food.

 

8) Respect Your Body


It is important to remember that every body is different. It is not good to worry about what your body is not, but rather, to embrace the body you have been given and use it to your advantage and best interest.


9) Exercise – Feel the Difference


Don’t let the Food Police hijack your exercise with thoughts of losing weight and calories. Instead, exercise for the enjoyment of it. Wake up and move to give your body a sense of life and fresh air. Exercising is a great influencer on your physical and mental health. Make sure you are making it a part of your life in some way.

 

10) Honor Your Health


This last principle is about including healthy foods in your diet. This is not so you can lose weight or prevent calories. Rather, this is a way you can help your body stay sufficient in essential nutrients and vitamins your body needs. With that said, make sure to research and find good foods that will be able to sustain you throughout the day.

 

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Skin Care for Children & Babies: What You Need to Know

 

Having a newborn baby raises a lot of questions you never thought of before. Are they hungry or just gassy? How do I properly treat a diaper rash? How warm should the bath water be? What’s the best way to keep my baby’s skin healthy? Skin care is a very important concept to master when taking care of newborns. The first thing to remember is that some skin conditions of your newborn are normal while others aren't. So, let’s begin with with learning what you should expect, as far as the health of your newborn’s skin is concerned.

 

What’s Normal


newborn baby yawning

When your baby first enters the world, the baby’s skin will have a purplish color that will develop into a red as they start breathing. The baby’s circulatory system is developing, so you will see this color change as the circulatory system reaches a more mature state.

If you see little pimple-like spots on your newborn’s nose, it is called milia and it will go away on its own. The same goes for red and pink spots on your child’s eyelids, neck, or upper lip. Stork bites or salmon patches, as they are called, show that the baby’s skin is working on developing the blood vessels more properly.

Skin peeling is very normal when your baby first enters into this world. Your baby must shed the skin used more appropriately for the womb to better conform to its new environment. This peeling stage will occur for the first few weeks following delivery.

 

What’s Not Normal


young baby in white blankets

Rashes are a normal factor that may accompany your baby periodically. However, if you are finding that there has been a combination of ongoing rashes and illness with your child, you should see a doctor right away.

If you are seeing a yellowish color on your newborn that consistently worsens day by day, your child is experiencing a condition called jaundice and should see a doctor as soon as possible. Although this yellowish color can be attributed as a normal reaction to a leveling in a newborn’s circulatory system, a deepening and consistency of this color overtime may be illustrating a more serious problem.

If you are witnessing a bluish color on your baby’s skin, that is NOT normal. Otherwise known as cyanosis, this blue coloring of your child is indicating possible heart defects and breathing problems. See your pediatrician immediately if any of these issues occur.

Skin care not only applies to your newborn, but also continues as your child gets older. Aiding in your child’s skin development from infancy to their later years as a child will help them for the rest of their lives! Below are some tips and tricks to help your newborns, babies, and children have the healthiest skin.

 

Skin Care Tips and Tricks


Newborns and Babies


Remember that with newborns and babies, skincare is extremely crucial. The following tips all have the same purpose of making sure that your child’s skin does not get worn out and dry. You don’t want your baby to end up with future skin problems.

1) Don’t bathe them too frequently.
2) Apply baby lotion following all baths.
3) Don’t use
fragrant baby products
4) Always wash bedding and clothing before having your baby wear them or sleep in them.
5) Change diapers frequently and use diaper creams.
6) Always put sunscreen on your baby before going outside.


 

Children


As your child gets older, skin care continues to stay crucial to your child’s development. These tips, similar to the ones given to newborns and babies, have the united purpose of keeping your child’s skin from dryness and irritation. Using lukewarm instead of warm or hot water, for example, prevents burning on the child’s skin and maintains its healthy state.

1) Use lukewarm water when bathing, never hot.
2) Keep your children hydrated, preferably giving them milk or water.
3) Bundle up in the winter and apply more sunscreen in the spring and summer.
4) Apply mild soaps when bathing.
5) Apply lotion following all baths.
6) Make sure your child gets plenty of sleep.


 

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.