Why it is Important to Prevent, Diagnose, and Treat Diabetes by Nathan Kiskila, M.D.





Nearly 26 million Americans are living with diabetes, and another 79 million are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes.  However, most Americans don’t consider diabetes a serious matter.  Recent numbers by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention paint a desperate situation of where we are and where we are headed:

  • Every 17 seconds, someone is diagnosed with diabetes.

  • Diabetes  kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined.

  • Recent estimates project that as many as 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes in 2050 unless we take steps to stop diabetes.


 
What is Diabetes?

Diabetes occurs when a person’s body doesn’t make enough of the hormone insulin or can’t use insulin properly. Type 1 diabetes occurs when your body’s pancreas doesn’t produce any insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas either doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body’s cells ignore the insulin. About 95% of people who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.

What are the symptoms of diabetes?

Most people have very few symptoms during the early stages of diabetes, so you may not know you have the disease. Damage may already be happening to your eyes, kidneys and cardiovascular system even before you notice symptoms. Common symptoms include:

  • Extreme thirst

  • Frequent urination

  • Unexplained weight loss

  • Fatigue or drowsiness

  • Blurry vision

  • Slow-healing wounds, sores or bruises

  • Dry, itchy skin

  • Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet

  • Frequent or recurring skin, gum, bladder or vaginal yeast infections


Call your doctor if:

  • You start feeling very thirsty and are urinating more often than usual.

  • You lose a significant amount of weight.

  • You start breathing deeper and faster.

  • Your breath smells like nail polish remover.

  • You start to tremble, feel weak and drowsy, and then feel confused or dizzy, or your vision becomes blurred.

  • You feel uncoordinated.

  • You have a sore, blister or wound that won't heal.


Why is it important to prevent, diagnose, and treat diabetes?  Untreated diabetes causes blood sugar levels to rise. This can lead to a number of serious problems, including:

  • Eye damage that can cause blindness

  • Kidney failure

  • Heart attacks

  • Nerve and blood vessel damage that can lead to the loss of toes or feet

  • Problems with gums, including tooth loss

  • The longer the body is exposed to high blood sugar levels, the greater the risk that problems will occur. That’s why diagnosing diabetes as early as possible is important. Treating diabetes can minimize, delay and, in some cases, even prevent the problems that diabetes can cause.


How is diabetes diagnosed?

  • Your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests:

  • Random blood sugar test. This test measures the level of glucose in your blood at any time of day, regardless of when you last ate.

  • Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done in the morning, after an 8-hour fast.

  • Oral glucose tolerance test. During this test, you will drink a beverage containing 75 grams of glucose dissolved in water.


If you think you have diabetes or would like to be tested for diabetes, call or visit your doctor.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
 
tent in front of lake

Health Tips for Camping Trips by Minnie Alcantara

 

Camping is always a fun way to get family and friends to enjoy the great outdoors.  Here are some health tips to keep your camping trip safe and healthy.

Wash hands often. Soap and water are your essentials to cleanliness.  If water is not present at the campsite, bring it with you.  Use anti-bacterial hand sanitizers if water is not available.  Set up a hand washing station if there is a spigot available at your campsite.  Always wash your hands after using the restroom, before handling any meals and especially when switching from prepping raw to cooked foods.

Keep foods separated and packed tightly. Use separate insulated coolers for drinks, produce and meat, and pack foods in waterproof bags. Small coolers will be easier to carry and this will reduce the risk for cross-contamination and the possibility of food-borne illnesses among the food.  Separating the foods will keep the bacteria from being able to migrate to all the others. Make sure to separate cooked foods from the raw foods. Foods should be cooked to the proper temperature (160 degrees) and chilled promptly.  Leftover foods are only safe when stored in a cooler with ice in it, otherwise discard of any leftover foods to avoid any food-borne illnesses.

Protect against carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is an odorless and colorless gas that causes sudden illnesses and death.  Do not use fuel-burning appliances in tents or enclosed spaces, for this will cause dangerous levels of carbon monoxide build up. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion.

Bring adequate bedding and clothing. Hypothermia is the lowering of the body's core temperature caused by over-exposure to cool or cold air or water. Campers should bring extra clothes and bedding as well as consume extra calories during their camp trip to prevent hypothermia.  Symptoms of hypothermia include intense shivering, ability to perform complex tasks is impaired, fatigue, poor coordination, immobile and fumbling hands.  Use a plastic cover under the tent to keep dry.  Wear layers of light-weighed, light-colored, and loose-fitting clothing.

Practice safe physical activities. Camping is the perfect time to be active with physical activities such as hiking, biking, walking and swimming.  Make sure to bring protective gears such as helmets, paddings, comfortable and sturdy shoes and life jackets.  Know your limits to avoid injuries during activities and avoid hiking or swimming alone.  Take a shower before and after swimming.  Do not swim if you are experiencing diarrhea and do not swallow the water you are swimming in.

Avoid wild animals. Avoid touching, feeding and getting near wild animals and watch them from a safe distance in their natural surroundings.  Some wild animals carry diseases dangerous to humans such as rabies.  Keep a close eye on family pets and their whereabouts.  Never feed the bears and do not leave food where bears may be attracted to it for your group’s safety.

Pack insect repellants. Ticks, mosquitos and other insects can cause certain diseases that include West Nile virus from mosquitos and Lyme disease from ticks.  Make sure to pack insect repellants containing 20% DEET and even apply the repellent to clothes to keep ticks from attaching to them.  Wear light colored clothing and check ticks daily. Remove the tick immediately and completely with tweezers. Wash the wound with antiseptic soap and apply antiseptic cream to the wound with a bandage.

Be protected from the sun. Make sure to apply sunscreen to be protected from skin cancer, wrinkles and premature skin aging.  It is important to bring broad-spectrum sunscreen and lipscreen with the minimum of SPF 15. Sunscreen should be applied even on days that are not sunny because UV rays are not blocked by the clouds and you will still get exposed.  Apply the sunscreen 15-30 minutes before going out in the sun to give the lotion the opportunity to penetrate the skin.  Reapply every couple of hours and more often in you are swimming or sweating.  Rest often in shady areas.

Stay hydrated. Dehydration occurs when the body loses excessive amount of fluid. Avoid dehydration by always carrying water or sport drink products during any activity.  Be prepared and bring water filter or water purification tablets as back up.  Always plan ahead and bring enough water for your trip, boil water at the camp site, or if purifying water using the tablets, keep in mind that this may take several hours.  Drink plenty of alcohol-free and sugar-free fluids to prevent heat-related illnesses during hot days.  Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink fluids.

Plan ahead. Check the weather forecast before leaving for your destination.  Learn about the security measures at your camp site and inform friends and family of your plans.  Plan your meals ahead of time and how you are going to prepare the food and what equipment will be needed.  Pack a first aid kit, flashlight, compass or GPS, maps, plenty of blankets, clothes, batteries, food, water and medications.  Make sure to check for ticks and insect bites when returning from the trip.

These are just some tips to make your camping trip as safe and enjoyable as possible.  Happy and safe travels!

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Lemon Cream Pie- Delicious & Guilt Free! by D.M.

Lemon Cream Pie – A summertime treat that’s both delicious and guilt free!

If you’re looking for a healthier version of this summertime classic, look no further! This recipe is sure to please. It calls for nonfat buttermilk, reduced-calorie margarine, egg substitute, reduced-calorie whipped topping, and low-fat graham crackers.

Time: Prep  11 minutes;  Cook  16 minutes;  Chill 2 hours

1 cup low-fat cinnamon graham cracker crumbs (about 7 crackers)

¼ cup reduced-calorie margarine, melted

¾ cup sugar

¼ cup plus 3 tablespoons cornstarch

1/8 teaspoon salt

1 cup water

2/3 cup nonfat buttermilk

½ cup fat-free egg substitute

2 teaspoons grated lemon rind

½ cup fresh lemon juice

2 ½ cups frozen reduced-calorie whipped topping, thawed

Lemon zest (optional)

Lemon rind curls (optional)

Fresh mint sprigs (optional)

 

  1. Combine cracker crumbs and margarine; stir well. Press into bottom and up sides of a 9-inch pie plate. Bake at 350˚ for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden. Remove from oven; let cool on a wire rack.

  2. Combine sugar, cornstarch, and salt in a saucepan; gradually stir in water and buttermilk. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil. Cook 1 minute.

  3. Gradually stir about one-fourth of hot mixture into egg substitute; add egg substitute mixture to remaining hot mixture, stirring constantly. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, 2 minutes or until thickened. Remove from heat; stir in 2 teaspoons lemon rind and lemon juice.

  4. Spoon lemon mixture into prepared crust. Cover; chill at least 2 hours. Spread whipped topping over filing just before serving. If desired, garnish with lemon zest, lemon rind curls, and fresh mint sprigs.  Yield: 8 servings.


Per serving:

Calories  251

Carbohydrates   46.4g

Protein  4.1g

Fat  7.2g

Fiber  0.6g

Cholesterol  1mg

Sodium  175mg

Calcium  47mg

 
fountain soda in a glass with a straw

Think Twice Before Drinking Diet Soda by Your Marque Team

 

Although diet sodas don’t contain calories, they can be loaded with artificial sugars such as aspartame.  Studies show that diet drinks can be linked to diabetes and obesity.  Not only do the "sugars" in diet soda  cause a spike in blood sugar, but they also make you hungrier and adjust your taste buds to crave sweeter flavors (which could leave you wanting more desserts).  Combined, these effects almost always lead to over-eating and overindulgence in sweets.  Zero calories or not, diet soda can have a serious impact on calorie consumption and leave you wondering why you are not losing weight?


Seltzer to the rescue!

One of the best ways to deal with soda withdrawal is to switch to soda water or seltzer water. You’ll get the same refreshing carbonation, minus the long term calorie increase.  A squeeze of lemon or lime is an option to make your seltzer more enjoyable.   Not a fan of the taste of seltzer?  Try the same thing with regular water.  Give it a week and see how you feel.

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Control Your Food Cravings by Eryn Shelton

Food cravings can WRECK your diet.  Craving a big, fluffy hunk of warm bread does not mean your body is deprived of grains. Food cravings have little to do with nutrients and plenty to do with the brain chemistry of pleasure and reward. Cravings may center on texture (i.e. creamy, crunchy) or taste (i.e. sweet, salty) but they all have something in common- overindulging which can sabotage your diet.

Ice Cream

People who get cravings tend to have a little bit higher BMI- no surprise since fattening foods are often the object of desire.  The combination of cream, sweet, and cold makes ice cream an irresistible treat. Unfortunately, a single serving can be packed with more than 230 calories.

Better Bet: Half a cup of slow-churned ice cream has less fat and half the calories.

Potato chips

Between the salt and crunchy, you can’t decide which tastes better. Depending on the flavor a 1oz snack pack has at least 150 calories. Munch your way through an 8 ounce bag and you’re looking at around 1200 calories… Yikes!

Better Bet: Dip celery or carrot sticks into hummus. You’ll still get that salty and crunchy fix with fewer calories.

Chocolate

Almost more than half of American women crave chocolate on a regular basis. There have been quite a few reasons such as magnesium deficiency or even mood swings.  However, adding a candy bar to your diet is like adding a couple hundred extra calories to your day.

Better Bet: have a small square of high- cocoa dark chocolate. It’s less fat than a typical candy bar.  It is good for your heart and will give you that perfect chocolate fix.

Popcorn

Sometimes a setting can trigger a craving. Memory plays a big role in cravings; you’ve enjoyed popcorn at the movies so you’ll enjoy it at home watching a movie. Popcorn itself can be a healthy snack but leave out the butter.  Butter contains fat and calories.

Donuts

Donuts are forbidden if you’re on a diet. The sweet savory donut can trigger a craving. Eating them one week and not the next can intensify the craving.

Better Bet: A whole grain bagel with peanut butter.

Red Meat

Do you feel like a real meal must contain a big hunk of red meat in it?  Think again.  You don’t have to pass on red meat altogether; you just need to change what cuts you decide to eat.  The typical flank steak has around 700 calories.  Different cuts contain different amounts of calories.

Better Bet: Try pork chops.  One pork chop has approximately 170 calories, so two pork chops are still fewer calories than one steak.

Pasta

Pasta is ranked as one of the top 5 favorite foods around the world. The trouble with pasta is that it’s made with refined flour.  White pasta has only a fifth of the fiber that whole grain pasta has, which means it will take more to fill you up.  Sauces aren’t very good for your diet either. A bowl of fettuccini has around 1200 calories.

Better Bet: Eat whole grain pasta with a vegetable based sauce.

Nuts

It’s hard to resist dipping your hand into the nut bowl at a party or bar, but all those handfuls add up.  A cup full of roasted nuts packs more than 800 calories.

Better Bet: Stick to nuts in their shell, it will slow you down.

Eating Snacks

If your cravings mainly happen when you’re hungry, try eating a healthy snack between meals. Carefully planning your snacks can help you keep hunger and cravings at bay. Portion control is the main key.  Each snack should be less than 200 calories.  Good snack choices include yogurt with fresh fruit, a hard-boiled egg, a fruit smoothie, or peppers and bean dip.

Take a Walk

You already know that exercise can help you lose weight by burning calories.  Now there is evidence that brisk walking can help you eat fewer sweets. In a study published in the journal Appetite, participants who took a 15 minute walk were half as likely to eat chocolate at their desks compared to those who took a 15 minute rest.

Low-Carb Diet

Putting favorite foods off-limits can make you crave them even more, but the opposite may be true down the road. That’s the conclusion of a study in the journal Obesity. After sticking to a low-carb diet for two years, a group of overweight adults craved carbs and starchy foods less.  A second group following a low-fat diet reported fewer cravings for fatty foods.

Indulge a Little

A taste in time saves nine! Resisting sweets when you’re at a party can be tough. Rather than depriving yourself until you cave, try indulging in a small serving of the desired food. You may find that just a taste will satisfy your craving to prevent future overindulgence.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
 

 

 

 

Menopause- It’s Not So Scary! by Magda Austin

Like every woman, I always believed that menopause is a fearful and stressful period in life. Hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, irritability, weight gain, and loss of libido were my only associations when I thought of menopause. However, recently I read an interesting article which completely changed my point of view; I no longer think about menopause as the end of the world. “Menopause- Time for a Change” is an article which shares a different and modern approach to menopause. The symptoms are still the same, but proper education, an optimistic attitude, and determination can make them less severe.

Menopause is a natural stage of aging, and simply means a transition in a woman’s reproductive life. Ovaries, while decreasing in size, produce a different amount of estrogen and progesterone, two significant hormones. Estrogen is very important and has influence on many cells in different parts of woman’s body including reproductive organs, heart, bones, brain, and blood vessels. Thus, as the levels of circulating estrogen in the body go down over time, women may experience negative changes in their cardiovascular system and bone density.

Daily exercising by the age of thirty helps to build bone density as much as possible, and at the same time prevent osteoporosis. Additionally, a healthy diet rich in calcium and vitamin D helps to keep our bones in good condition. An active lifestyle and proper diet has a huge impact on our cholesterol level, which also changes during menopause: total cholesterol, LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and triglycerides may go up, while HDL (high-density lipoprotein) goes down. It is important we keep those numbers under control and within normal range, since high numbers of LDL’s and triglycerides result in clogged arteries which leads to a heart attack or stroke.

Menopausal symptoms may occur earlier than expected as a result of radiation treatment, medicines used in chemotherapy, genetic errors, or surgery. Surgical menopause, called hysterectomy (removal of uterus), or bilateral oophorectomy (removal of both ovaries), stops menstrual periods right away. If the uterus is removed, but one or both ovaries are left, they may still produce estrogen and progesterone. However, these hormones may stop production sooner than expected. Studies suggest that women who have had a hysterectomy will experience much more severe menopausal symptoms than women who stopped producing hormones naturally. Some women may choose hormone replacement as a way to reduce menopausal discomfort while also preventing osteoporosis.

A healthy lifestyle, good diet, exercise, and an optimistic attitude have the most significant influence on how a woman feels during menopause.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information. 

 

 



 

 
Young couple in mountains smiling

Hiking Tips by Your Marque Team

 

Southern California offers many terrific hiking trails for exploring and recreation.  Here are some tips to keep bugs and snakes away and information about what to do if bitten:


How to Avoid Spider Bites

Spider bites generally happen if a spider is stepped on or while dressing because they can hide in shirt sleeves or pant legs.  Most spiders don’t prey on people or attack.  Many have fangs but they are not capable of piercing a person’s skin.  If you think you may have been bitten by a dangerous spider, clean the wound with soap and water, use a cool compress, and go see a doctor immediately.  Symptoms requiring immediate attention are profuse sweating, trouble swallowing, blurry vision, loss of muscle control, and difficulty breathing.  If you are cautious while on the hiking trail your odds are low that you will be bitten.  Practice these tips:

  • Don’t pick up or try to touch a spider

  • Don’t reach or step into cracks in rocks that you can’t see

  • Check your boots and shoes; shake out your clothes

  • Keep your tent and bags zipped shut; boxes sealed

  • Don’t walk around barefoot


Bee and Wasp Stings

Bees and wasps inject venom through their stinger into the victim’s skin.  A bee has a barbed stinger that is left in the skin.  If you get stung by a bee, do not use tweezers to remove the stinger.  That can cause more venom to be injected into your skin.  Instead, gently scrape the stinger away.  Most people will have a painful, reddened reaction at the site of the sting.  They may also experience swelling.  The pain usually disappears within a few hours.  If a person develops an allergic reaction, they may experience the following:  nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dizziness.  This would happen within minutes of the sting and with each new bee sting their symptoms would most likely get worse.  Less than one percent of people develop a life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis.  If a person has this reaction they must seek treatment from their doctor and take special precautions to carry an “Epipen” to save their lives.

Ticks

Ticks are blood feeding parasites of mammals. They are usually found in brush or grasses along hiking trails.  Once a tick has transferred itself to a host, the tick secretes a cement-like substance which glues it to the host’s skin and the feeding begins.  When bitten, a mild to severe sting is felt along with some skin reddening near the site of the bite.  If you find a tick, you should remove it with tweezers by grasping it as close to the skin and applying a steady upward pressure to make sure the entire tick is pulled free.  Then apply an antiseptic to the affected area.  Do not use heat to remove the tick.

Snakes

Most snakes in Southern California are typically not aggressive and want to be left alone.  The most common dangerous snake in Southern California is the rattlesnake.  Rattlesnakes can be identified by their rattles and their triangular heads.  They can also sometimes be identified by the rattling sound that their tail makes.  However, don’t be fooled by that because they don’t always make noise.  Rattlesnakes can strike rapidly without having to pull back and lunge forward.  Therefore, you will have no idea they are about to strike.  Baby rattlers are more dangerous than adult rattlesnakes.  They cannot control their venom and do not have functional rattles until after a few moltings.  The most dangerous rattlesnakes are baby rattlesnakes and the Mojave Rattlesnake.  The average rattler has hemotoxic venom which causes tissue damage and disrupts blood clotting.  Mojave Rattlesnakes have neurotoxic venom, which can cause paralysis and breathing difficulties.

Poisonous Plants

You may encounter poisonous plants while hiking.  A simple rule of “Leaves of 3 – Let them be” is good to follow.  The only variety of poison-oak found in Southern California is “Western Poison-oak” also known as “Pacific Poison-oak.”  Poison-oak is not a variety of oak, so the spelling includes a hyphen to distinguish it as a separate type of plant.  Poison-ivy and Poison Sumac are not found in Southern California.  Any trial to a waterfall may have poison-oak present.  What to look for in poison oak:

  • Lobed leaves similar in appearance to actual oak leaves

  • Grow in sets of three leaflets

  • The glossy shiny leaf surface

  • Initially bright green but changing throughout the seasons often to a mix of green and bright red with some yellow

  • Found in damp, shady areas near water and out of direct sunlight


If you believe you have come in contact with poison oak, the symptoms to look for are: moderate to severe itching, inflammation bumps, blistering (when scratched).  Treatment can be as simple as Hydrocortisone cream used to relieve itching symptoms. Or you should go to a doctor if your itching is severe.  Some people are highly allergic to this and complications can occur.

But most of all you should take care of yourself while hiking.  Drink and take plenty of water with you as well as some protein bars in case you get hungry and need a snack.  You don’t want to be tempted by any poisonous berries along the way!

 

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.

Safe Swimming Tips by Magda Austin

Summer is here and swimming is one of the most popular attractions during those hot days. Swimming is a great sport activity which offers a large number of health benefits. However, pools, hot tubs, and other kind of recreational waters, can be a source of Recreational Water Illness as well as a place where serious injuries can occur. Here are few tips for safe, summer swimming:

• Make sure everyone who is in the water knows how to swim.

• At least one person should know CPR in case of emergency.

• Never swim alone.

• While going to the beach, make sure to swim in places that are marked as safe to swim and have a lifeguard on duty.

• Never leave unsupervised children in the water. Drowning is one of the leading causes of death among small children, and those who survive, many times suffer serious, permanent brain damage.

• Do not swallow pool water because chlorine does not always kill all the germs or bacteria. Even swallowing a little bit of contaminated water can cause Recreational Water Illness like diarrhea, skin rash, ear or eye infections.

• Do not go to the pool if you have a cold, rash, pink eye, skin sores, etc. Remember, you are sharing pool water with other people. Therefore, if you enter the pool while you are ill, you are automatically sharing all you germs with everybody else.

• Neither children nor adults should be running around the pool area. We have to remember the surface around the pool is wet and very slippery so we are more likely to slip and fall.

• Parents - if you have a small child that wears a diaper and you need to change them – do not do it around pool area, use the bathroom instead. By doing this you prevent spreading germs.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.
 

 

 


 

 

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) by Your Marque Team

More MSG please.

Neurotoxins are found everywhere; preservatives, pesticides, and flavoring additives.  In short, the FDA has failed to protect the consumer against potentially serious conditions which occur secondary to ingesting monosodium glutamate (MSG).  Glutamate is the active ingredient. In our body, natural levels of glutamic acid are used in order to regulate nerve and healthy brain function.  However, overloading the brain with synthetic glutamate may lead to over-stimulating neural receptors which cause the opposite effect on brain function, optic nerve function, and pancreatic function.

Without naming brands or products, we can list very specific ingredients which must legally be disclosed on the nutrition label to help protect you and your loved ones. Everyone may have a different reaction to monosodium glutamate (MSG) which is the most widely distributed and increasingly common neurotoxin.

Additives that always will contain MSG include these various forms of hydrolyzed protein:

  • Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein

  • Hydrolyzed Plant Protein

  • Hydrolyzed Oat Flour

  • Autolyzed Yeast


Additionally, it is hidden in ingredients such as:

  • Sodium Caseinate

  • Calcium Caseinate

  • Yeast Extract

  • Textured Vegetable Protein


MSG can cause a range of side effects.  Adults may experience headache, nausea, and bloating after a large dosing of MSG.  In children, cognitive changes have been observed and instances of ADHD, Asperger’s a type of autism, and OCD have dramatically increased in our population.  Incidentally, Abilify, which is a type of mood stabilizer has been approved for treatment of ADHD in children.  An easier way to mitigate the effect on neurotransmitters would be to eliminate the MSG intake from the diet.

Less processed means less additives. Protect yourself and your family by avoiding pre-packaged meals, soy sauces, Umami flavors, and anything that looks overly glazed.

The information provided is for general interest only and should not be misconstrued as a diagnosis, prognosis or treatment recommendation. This information does not in any way constitute the practice of medicine, or any other health care profession. Readers are directed to consult their health care provider regarding their specific health situation. Marque Medical is not liable for any action taken by a reader based upon this information.